History Summer Courses

Understanding Historical Change: Modern Europe
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Our focus will be on three critical eras: the Enlightenment and French Revolution; the first Industrial Revolution and Victorian culture; and 1914-45, the era of total war. We will consider how historians explain such events and we will discuss how pivotal individuals help determine the direction of history: Robespierre, Napoleon, Marx, Lenin, Stalin, Churchill, Hitler.

Course Number: HIST 1000 R11, Cancelled
Instructor: Patriarca
3 credits


Understanding Historical Change: Modern Europe
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Our focus will be on three critical eras: the Enlightenment and French Revolution; the first Industrial Revolution and Victorian culture; and 1914-45, the era of total war. We will consider how historians explain such events and we will discuss how pivotal individuals help determine the direction of history: Robespierre, Napoleon, Marx, Lenin, Stalin, Churchill, Hitler. Syllabus

Course Number: HIST 1000 L21, CRN: 10285
Instructor: Bristow
3 credits


Understanding Historical Change: American History
Session III, May 30 - August 8, 2017
Online

A course focusing on significant periods in the development of the United States and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook. Fordham students (FCRH, FCLC, GSB) should refer to the registration policies here for more information. Syllabus

Course Number: HIST 1100 PW1, CLOSED
Instructor: Gauthier
3 credits


Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Greece
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

A political, social, and intellectual history of ancient Greece from its origin to the death of Alexander the Great. Syllabus

Course Number: HIST 1210 L11, CRN: 10095
Instructor: Foster
3 credits


Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Rome
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Introduction to Roman history focusing on problems and sources.Syllabus

Course Number: HIST 1220 R21, CRN: 10196
Instructor: Keil
3 credits


Understanding Historical Change: Africa
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Introduction to the political, social, economic, and institutional history of Africa. Fulfills the Globalism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: AFAM 1600 L11, CRN: 10091
Instructor: Idris
3 credits


The World of Queen Elizabeth
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TTh (hybrid), 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

This course seeks to move beyond the standard biographical studies of Elizabeth I by exploring the world that the last Tudor sovereign inhabited. It will do so by looking at four overlapping themes, which, together, shaped the Elizabethan world (1558-1603); state and society in the kingdom of England; the politics and diplomacy of Reformation Europe; England's overseas discoveries; and the extension of Tudor rule in the kingdom of Ireland. Fulfills the EP 3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. This course will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays with online participation required. Open to all. Syllabus

Course Number: HIST 3430 L11, CRN: 10109
Instructor: Maginn
4 credits


War and Imperialism
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MW (hybrid), 6 - 9 p.m.

This course will explore the strains placed on the old Concert of Europe and its eventual collapse into two world wars. Themes of nationalism and imperialism will be stressed as well as domestic and international sources of conflict. This course meets Mondays and Wednesdays with online participation required. Open to all. Fulfills the Advanced History requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Syllabus

Course Number: HIST 3566 R11, CRN: 10061
Instructor: Hamlin
4 credits


Latino History
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, and citizenship. Fulfills the EP3, Pluralism, and Advanced History requirements in Fordham's core curriculum. Syllabus

Course Number: HIST 3950 R11, CRN: 10060
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits


Film, Fiction, and American Power
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Visual and written representations of American power have influenced, challenged, and even transformed U.S. relations in the world. With their capacity to reach millions, films and fiction do more than tell stories or entertain audiences. They also have the unparalled means to shape values and beliefs, and to convey attitudes toward the nature and practice of American power. What sort of themes of international power did authors, screen-writers, and directors address in the twentieth century? What do these reflections on power reveal about American society, its politics, and its place in the world?

Course Number: HIST 4009 L11, Cancelled
Instructor: Dietrich
4 credits


Rise of the American Suburb
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

An examination of the nineteenth-century origins of the suburb as a counterpoint to the city and the role of nature in shaping the design of this new form of country living. The twentieth-century transformation of the suburb into the American dream will be evaluated in light of the resultant sprawl and the policy critiques of this pattern of growth. Fulfills the EP3 and Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: HIST 4031 L21, CRN: 10284
Instructor: Appels
4 credits


Latinos: Fact and Fiction
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the experiences of Latin Americans and Latinos. It employs literature and history to introduce students to the benefits of using multiple ways of acquiring knowledge. It then relies on other academic areas such as art and sociology to reinforce its interdisciplinarity. As a capstone course, it allows students to incorporate disciplines from their own academic foundation. It covers topics such as politics, social justice, race, gender, and identity. Fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: LALS 4347 R21, CRN: 10323 / HIST 4347 R21, CRN 10870
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits


History of U.S. Foreign Relations, 1898-Present
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TR, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate Course. This graduate course covers the history and historiography of U.S. foreign relations from 1898 to the present. Topics include Open Door imperialism, the First and Second World Wars, the Cold War, decolonization, the Vietnam War, and the War on Terror. Students will situate the United States, its domestic cultures, and its foreign policies to different regions, in a global perspective. In addition, students will study the economic, social, intellectual, political, and moral bases of U.S. foreign relations. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

Course Number: HIST 5574 R11, CRN: 10158
Instructor: Dietrich
4 credits


Social Movements in a Global Perspective
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: TR, 6 - 9 p.m.

This course examines social movements in the twentieth-century. It focuses on events in Latin America, Europe, and the United States, among other regions. It allows students to asses the advantages and limitations of using a global approach to historical analysis.

Course Number: HIST 5921 R21, CRN: 10269
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits