Sociology and Anthropology Summer Courses

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and family, adaptations to the environment and to political, economic, and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures. Fulfills the Globalism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Syllabus

Course Number: ANTH 1100 L11, CRN: 10135
Instructor: Maraesa
3 credits


Introduction to Physical Anthropology
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Students are introduced to our closest relatives, monkeys and apes, through examination of skeletal remains and visits to the zoo. After a study of mechanisms of heredity and speciation, the evolution of humanity is traced from its earliest beginnings to modern times, paying special attention to the development of intelligence, language, and racial characteristics.

Course Number: ANTH 1200 R11, CRN: 10084
Instructor: Matsuda Goodwin
3 credits


Introduction to Archaeology
Session II, July 5-August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

How do we study a society when no living members of that culture remain? Students will examine the ways by which archaeologists have inferred former patterns of behavior from surviving evidence through a survey of traditional methods as well as new scientific techniques. Students will study artifacts from the University's collection and 'excavate' their own archaeological site on paper to better understand the process of investigation. Fulfills the Globalism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: ANTH 1300 L21, CRN: 10303
Instructor: Consroe
3 credits


Introduction to Fashion and Culture
Session II, July 5-August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

In this class, students will be introduced to cultural and media studies concepts that will equip them with the theoretical and methodological tools necessary to explore fashion as an historically-situated and context-dependent form of communication and meaning-making. The course considers the implications of fashion within systems of power, everyday acts of self-presentation, and larger politics of representation.

Course Number: ANTH 1500 L21, CRN: 10305
Instructor: Cox
4 credits


Anthropology of J.R.R. Tolkien
Session II, July 5-August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

The fictional writing of J.R.R. Tolkien, including The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings, has many direct correlations with historical Europe, and beyond its literary value, it can serve in some ways as an ethnographic account of the curious land of Middle Earth. The works describe an extraordinary panorama of myth and borrowed facts, from which we can refine our understanding of the "other" through analysis of sociolinguistics, funerary ritual, cultural norms, and archaeology while simultaneously exploring the source of Tolkien's imaginative creations. Fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: ANTH 4005 L21, CRN: 10304
Instructor: Consroe
4 credits


Art Worlds: Anthropological and Sociological Perspectives
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City's cultural communities and institutions, this course will analyze the arts and artistic communities of New York City. The study of culture generally, and art worlds more specifically, allows us to understand art and culture not only as aesthetic experiences, but also as institutional, economic, social, and political phenomena. Our summer mid-day time slot will allow us to avail ourselves of numerous field trips and cultural excursions to support our discussions, readings, and lectures. This course fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: ANTH 4004 L11, CRN: 10136; SOCI 4004 L11, CRN: 10140
Instructor: McGee/Salwaha
4 credits


Introduction to Sociology
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course serves as a prerequisite to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies. 

Course Number: SOCI 1100 L11, CRN: 10137
Instructor: DeAndrade
3 credits


Introduction to Sociology
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course serves as a prerequisite to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies. Syllabus

Course Number: SOCI 1100 R11, CRN: 10085
Instructor: Bilous
3 credits


Introduction to Sociology
Session II, July 5-August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course serves as a prerequisite to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

Course Number: SOCI 1100 R21, CRN: 10226
Instructor: Thompson
3 credits


Introduction to Sociology
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course serves as a prerequisite to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies. Fordham students (FCRH, FCLC, GSB) should refer to the registration policies here for more information. Syllabus

Course Number: SOCI 1100 PW1, CRN: 10003
Instructor: Kurti
3 credits


Media, Crime, Sex, Violence
Session II, July 5-August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

An analysis of mass-media reporting, presentation, and explanation. Fulfills the Advanced Social Science requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: SOCI 2925 R21, CRN: 10227
Instructor: Wormser
4 credits


Popular Culture
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TTh (hybrid), 6-9 p.m.

Popular culture looks at the phenomenon of American popular culture and asks how Americans use their leisure time and what these activities suggest about contemporary society. Do sports events provide models for social engagement? Does the popularity of cooking and home improvement shows serve to compensate for diminished time with family and friends? Are museums and other elite cultural institutions sites of a secular religion of high culture? What does it mean that makeover "before and after" culture has come to dominate television and print media? How are video games and online contexts reshaping our social worlds? Through in person lectures, in person and online discussions, and field trips that explore the best of New York City's cultural life, we'll explore the meanings and impact of the many ways we spend our leisure time. Fulfills the Advanced Social Science requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. This course will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays with online participation required. Open to all.

Course Number: SOCI 2960 L11, CRN: 10138
Instructor: McGee
4 credits


Imagining Alternative Worlds
Session II, July 5-August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Confronted as we are by many major social problems throughout the United States and the world, is it even possible to imagine a better society than the present one? Drawing on Utopian texts and science fiction novels and films, students will work in teams to blueprint a small-scale community of their choice that improves upon one that presently exists. Students will examine specific social structures such as families, educational institutions, gender relations, and politics, etc. They will work together and conduct fieldwork such as interviews, photography of sites, and graphic designs, to make a presentation at the end of the course.

Course Number: SOCI 2966 R21, CRN: 10228
Instructor: Wormser
4 credits


For the Death of Me: Sociocultural Perspectives on Death and Dying
Session II, July 5-August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

The primary goal of this course is to explore the social and cultural implications of the biological experience of human death and dying. Examples of topics that will be covered include: mortuary rituals and funerary behavior, the cultural construction of death, the effects of death on the social fabric, mourning and bereavement, end-of-life issues, as well as ethical and moral issues relating to death. Throughout the course, we will examine the fascinating variety of social and cultural responses to the biological fact of death. In doing so, we will explore anthropological and sociological literature that seeks to explain or interpret that tremendous variety. The course will be cross-cultural in its outlook and will require students to make conceptual connections between theoretical literature and empirical observations. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: SOCI 3249 L21, CRN: 10306
Instructor: Yurguis
4 credits


Contemporary Immigration in Global Perspectives
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This class explores multiple questions related to immigration: Why do people migrate across international borders? Can states control migration, especially "unwanted" migrants? We examine the policies that let some people in, while keeping others out, and then consider incorporation, the process by which foreign "outsiders" become integrated into their new home. Fulfills the EP3 and Pluralism requirements in Fordham's core curriculum.Syllabus

Course Number: SOCI 3418 R11, CRN: 10086
Instructor: Gilbertson
4 credits


Modern American Social Movements
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Social movements in 20th-century America have been vehicles of political protest, social change, and sometimes also resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and popular culture? In addition to a general and theoretical assessment of social movements, this course introduces students to particular movements that have formed over such issues as alcohol consumption, racism, war, and abortion. Fulfills the Advanced Social Science and Pluralism requirements in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: SOCI 3456 R11, CRN: 10087
Instructor: Thompson
4 credits


Diversity in American Families
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course focuses on the forms and structures of the family with emphasis on practices and ideologies, and how they vary by race/ethnicity, immigration status, gender, and sexuality. Fulfills the Advanced Social Science, EP3, and Pluralism requirements in Fordham's core curriculum. Syllabus

Course Number: SOCI 3506 L11, CRN: 10139
Instructor: Weinshenker
4 credits


Criminology
Session I, May 30-June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course surveys the state of knowledge and theories explaining criminal behavior and attempts to control it by society. Although the sociological perspective on crime is emphasized, we will pursue a multidisciplinary point of view, especially with respect to legal, biological, and psychological views of crime.

Course Number: SOCI 3713 R11, CRN: 10088
Instructor: Kurti
4 credits


Internship Seminar
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: M, 6-9:45 p.m.

May 30-August 8: Placement in a work setting of their choice provides students with an opportunity to assess their own career goals while simultaneously enriching their understanding of how social groups function. Issues and topics from the sociology of formal organizations, including work role socialization; organization of social systems; bureaucracy and its public, formal and social processes in organizations; managerial ideologies, and the relation between character and career are discussed. Placements must be obtained prior to class in collaboration with the Career Services office. Register through the Office of Summer Session by emailing summerschool@fordham.edu. Syllabus

Course Number: SOCI 4900 L11, CRN: 10030
Instructor: Pappas
4 credits