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Sociology and Anthropology Summer Courses

ANTH 1100 L11 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and family, adaptations to the environment and to political, economic, and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures. Fulfills the Globalism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN:
Instructor: Mendoza
3 credits


ANTH 1300 L21 - Introduction to Archaeology
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

How do we study a society when no living members of that culture remain? Students will examine the ways by which archaeologists have inferred former patterns of behavior from surviving evidence through a survey of traditional methods as well as new scientific techniques. Students will study artifacts from the University's collection and 'excavate' their own archaeological site on paper to better understand the process of investigation. Fulfills the Globalism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN:
Instructor: Consroe
3 credits


ANTH 1500 L21 - Introduction to Fashion and Culture
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

In this class, students will be introduced to cultural and media studies concepts that will equip them with the theoretical and methodological tools necessary to explore fashion as a historically situated and context dependent form of communication and meaning making. The course considers the implications of fashion within systems of power, every day acts of self-presentation, and larger politics of representation.

CRN:
Instructor: Staff
4 credits


ANTH 4004 L11 - Art Worlds: Anthropological and Sociological Perspective
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City's cultural communities and institutions, this course will analyze the arts and artistic communities of New York City. The study of culture generally, and art worlds more specifically, allows us to understand art and culture not only as aesthetic experiences, but also as institutional, economic, social, and political phenomena. Our summer mid-day time slot will allow us to avail ourselves of numerous field trips and cultural excursions to support our discussions, readings, and lectures. Cross-listed with SOCI 4004, this course fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. 

CRN:
Instructor: Salwalha/McGee
4 credits


ANTH 4114 R11 - Anthropology of Health and Healing
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Health and illness will be studied as an interrelationship of biology, ecology, and culture in antiquity and contemporary societies. Among concepts of health and healing explored in Euro-American and non-Western cultures are: What is "normal"? What causes disease? Who can heal? What treatments are provided? What impact does modernization have on these cultural patterns. This course fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN:
Instructor: Griffiths
4 credits


SOCI 1100 L11 - Introduction to Sociology
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course serves as a prerequisite to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

CRN:
Instructor: Durkin
3 credits


SOCI 1100 R11 - Introduction to Sociology
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Rose Hill: TWth, 1-4 p.m.

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course serves as a prerequisite to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

CRN:
Instructor: Andrade
3 credits


SOCI 2847 R21 - The Sixties: Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

The 1960's was one of the most tumultuous eras in American history, marked by a revolutionary movement led by youth struggling for freedom on many levels. African Americans, with white support, struggled against the oppression of racial segregation of the South in the Civil Rights movement: young people sought sexual freedom and the right to experiment with drugs; musicians broke away from the traditional institutions of political and economic power by protesting against the war in Vietnam; women challenged traditional male attitudes that confined them to domesticity or inferior status in the work place and in society; gays organized against the repressive laws and prejudices against homosexuality. This course will show how all of these social strands intertwined using films, music, and writings from the era.  Fulfills the Advanced Social Science requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN:
Instructor: Wormser
4 credits


SOCI 2925 R21 - Media, Crime, Sex, Violence
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

An analysis of mass-media reporting, presentation, and explanation. Fulfills the Advanced Social Science requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN:
Instructor: Montes
4 credits


SOCI 2960 L11 - Popular Culture
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: TTh (hybrid), 6-9 p.m.

Popular culture looks at the phenomenon of American popular culture and asks how Americans use their leisure time and what these activities suggest about contemporary society. Do sports events provide models for social engagement? Does the popularity of cooking and home improvement shows serve to compensate for diminished time with family and friends? Are museums and other elite cultural institutions sites of a secular religion of high culture? What does it mean that makeover "before and after" culture has come to dominate television and print media? How are video games and online contexts reshaping our social worlds? Through in person lectures, in person and online discussions, and field trips that explore the best of New York City's cultural life, we'll explore the meanings and impact of the many ways we spend our leisure time. Fulfills the Advanced Social Science requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. This course will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays with online participation required. Open to all.

CRN:
Instructor: McGee
4 credits


SOCI 3249 L21 - For the Death of Me! Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Death and Dying
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

The primary goal of this course is to explore the social and cultural implications of the biological experience of human death and dying. Examples of topics that will be covered include: mortuary rituals and funerary behavior, the cultural construction of death, the effects of death on the social fabric, mourning and bereavement, end-of-life issues, as well as ethical and moral issues relating to death. Throughout the course, we will examine the fascinating variety of social and cultural responses to the biological fact of death. In doing so, we will explore anthropological and sociological literature that seeks to explain or interpret that tremendous variety. The course will be cross-cultural in its outlook and will require students to make conceptual connections between theoretical literature and empirical observations. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN:
Instructor: Yurguis
4 credits


SOCI 3503 L11 - Work, Family, and Gender
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course examines how two key institutions in society – the workplace and the family – interact with one another. Special emphasis is placed on the critical ways that work-family balance and conflict are conditioned by gender. The course will cover the impacts – both negative and positive – of work demands upon individuals’ family lives, as well as the effects of family obligations upon workers and workplaces. Students will be familiarized with voluntary responses to work-family challenges on the part of individuals, families, and employers, as well as relevant public policies in the U.S. and around the world.

CRN:
Instructor: Weinshenker
4 credits


SOCI 4004 L11 - Art Worlds: Anthropological and Sociological Perspective
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City's cultural communities and institutions, this course will analyze the arts and artistic communities of New York City. The study of culture generally, and art worlds more specifically, allows us to understand art and culture not only as aesthetic experiences, but also as institutional, economic, social, and political phenomena. Our summer mid-day time slot will allow us to avail ourselves of numerous field trips and cultural excursions to support our discussions, readings, and lectures. Cross-listed with ANTH 4004, this course fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN:
Instructor: Salwalha/McGee
4 credits