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BASW Courses

As a student in the Bachelor of Arts in Social Work (BASW) program, you’ll need to take the following eight courses in the sequence outlined in the BASW Plans of Study and complete a fieldwork placement accompanied by a biweekly integrative seminar.

SOWK 6005: Contemporary Social Welfare Policy (3 credits)
Students will learn that human rights and justice drive social welfare policies and their implementation at the international, federal, state, and local levels. The course introduces students to the underlying values, assumptions and philosophical perspectives that have influenced the development of the US social welfare system, its goals, policies and programs.  Students will learn about policy formulation, analysis, and the role of social work in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. The course introduces students to the historical, social, cultural, political, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. 

SOWK 6040: Integrating Human Rights and Justice in Practice (3 credits)
Every person regardless of position in society or geographic location has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety and security, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. This course introduces students to how social workers may conceptualize the global intersections and interconnections of justice, equality and human rights. Students are introduced to an integrated practice framework that promotes human rights and justice and identifies the root causes of global social issues. They will explore theories that address human need, social, economic, and environmental justice, intersectionality, diversity, and oppression and discrimination. In this course, students learn how to recognize the extent to which a culture’s structure and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power. Students learn to engage in advocacy to advance human rights social, economic, and environmental justice domestically and internationally.

SOWK 6305: Social Work Skills Lab (3 credits)
This skill-based course is anchored in the knowledge of generalist social work practice. Students will develop competency in performing essential social work skills via simulations, role-plays and peer activities. These skills will be applied to working with client systems including individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations. Case scenarios developed for this course will reflect the realities of contemporary social work practice. The emphasis will be on student performance in using the engagement and intervention skills with various client systems.

SOWK 6320: Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities (3 credits)
This course uses a generalist framework to prepare students for direct social work practice with organizations and communities. Learners explore the theories, knowledge and fundamental skills necessary to practice successfully with organizations and communities. Students will learn the multiple phases of practices from engagement through termination. Students will be introduced to the ethical and legal obligations that guide social work practice with organizations and communities. 

SOWK 6323: Social Work Practice with Individuals Across the Lifespan (3 credits)  
This course uses a generalist framework to prepare students for direct social work practice with individuals. Learners explore the theories, knowledge and fundamental skills necessary to practice successfully with individual clients. Students will learn the multiple phases of practices from engagement through termination. Students will be introduced to the ethical and legal obligations that guide social work practice with individuals.  Prerequisites: SOWK 6305—Social Work Skills Lab & SOWK 6320: Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities. Corequisite: Must be take concurrently with SOWK 6901—Fieldwork and Integrative Seminar

SOWK 6324: Social Work Practice with Families and Groups Across the Lifespan (3 credits) 
This course uses a generalist framework to prepare students for direct social work practice with families and groups. Learners explore the theories, knowledge and fundamental skills necessary to practice successfully with families and groups. Students will learn the multiple phases of practices from engagement through termination. Students will be introduced to the ethical and legal obligations that guide social work practice with families and groups. Prerequisite: SOWK 6323: Social Work Practice with Individuals Across the Lifespan. Corequisite: Must be take concurrently with SOWK 6901—Fieldwork and Integrative Seminar

SOWK 6440: Advanced Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis (3 credits)
The course builds on the skills, values, knowledge and processes of the generalist curriculum, serving as a bridge between generalist and advanced assessment theory and practice.  Specifically, the course extends the person-in-environment assessment perspective of Generalist Practice with the addition of more intensive assessment of the individual’s inner world, including psychodynamic conflicts processes and ego defenses. The course is entitled “Advanced Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis” rather than “Psychopathology” to remind students that clinical assessment need not lead to a diagnosis of mental illness.   The course covers practitioner self-awareness; the relationship between mental health and mental illness; risk and resilience; bio-psycho-social-spiritual assessment; a strength-informed cooperative assessment process; a critical use of the DSM-5, and major types of mental illness and their evidence –supported treatments.  

SOWK 6803: Applied Social Work Research and Evaluation (3 credits)
This course introduces students to social work research. It focuses on the scientific method from the process of developing knowledge to critically evaluating research. Students will learn about formulating a research question; research methodology, including study design, sampling, measurement, and data collection methods; ethical issues in research; and understanding how to read and understand research reports and publications. 

SOWK 6901: Fieldwork and Integrative Seminar (9 credits) 
This two semester course includes 600 hours in a year-long field placement and an integrative seminar.  The overall purpose of the required integrative seminar is to assist students to combine what they learn in the classroom with what they learn in the field.  This is structured as a capstone course integrating competencies from both their social work coursework and the broader Fordham University undergraduate core curriculum.  This course will prepare students to enter into agency based practice as well as to enter into advanced social work education.