Karen Brobst

PhD

Karen Brobst

Associate Professor

School Psychology

113 West 60th Street
Room 1016C
brobst@fordham.edu
212-636-6429

Dr. Brobst is a Associate Professor of School Psychology in the Division of Psychological and Educational Services at the Fordham University Graduate School of Education.

Before joining the Fordham faculty, she worked as the Research Director for Hilson Research Inc., a test publishing company, and as Project Director of the Intergenerational Literacy Project at the Columbia University Teachers College Literacy Center.

Education

PhD, Applied Educational Psychology: School Psychology, May 1996, Teachers College, Columbia University

MA in Educational Psychology, May 1980 , Teachers College, Columbia University

BA in Psychology and Biology, May 1977, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Research

Research Interests

Achievement Goal Theory

Achievement Motivation

Selected Publications

Jackson , M.A., Potere, J.C, & Brobst, K.E. (2006). Are success learning experiences and self-efficacy beliefs associated with occupational interests and aspirations of at-risk urban youth. Journal of Career Assessment, 14, 333-353.

Peverly, S. T., Brobst, K. E., Graham, M. & Shaw, R. (2003). College adults are not good at self-regulation: A study on the relationship of self-regulation, note-taking, and test-taking. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 335-346.

Ponterotto, J.G., Costa, C. I., Brobst, K. Kowalewska, D., Mendelsohn, J., Scheinholtz, J., Martinez, D. (2007). Multicultural personality dispositions and psychological well-being. Journal of Social Psychology.

Courses

Correlational Analysis

Developmental Disabilities/Mental Retardation

Experimental Design

Integration of Assessment Techniques

Internship Seminar

Issues and Trends in American Education

Faculty Fellowship

Dr. Brobst was awarded a faculty fellowship for the 2007-2008 academic year. Her fellowship activities included development of a reading strategies assessment instrument for middle and high school students.