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Course Offerings

FCRH Manresa Course Offerings

The following Manresa courses are offered to Fordham College at Rose Hill students and will be one of five courses you take in the fall semester.

Each course fulfills the Eloquentia Perfecta 1 Core Requirement and one or more specific FCRH freshman core requirements

Lost Interlocutor: Philosophy of Human Nature

Professor Robert J. Parmach 

PHIL 1003-R01 (CRN: 10059), Monday & Thursday 8:30am-9:45am

Proceeding by the Socratic Method, this course examines the views of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Descartes, and their intellectual links to contemporary science, religion, and Jesuit education. We investigate salient themes, including existence, knowledge, truth, mind, justice, morality, reality, belief, and love. The course stresses critical spoken dialogue and writing-intensive assignments, many of which consist of interactive (and fun) out-of-class learning experiences. The professor even feeds you at most of these.

This course satisfies the Philosophy of Human Nature and Eloquentia Perfecta 1 Core requirements.

Drug Discovery: From the Laboratory to the Clinic

Professor Joshua Schrier 

CHEM 1102-R01 (CRN: 44769), Tuesday & Friday 1:00pm-2:15pm

A rigorous course for non-science majors on the scientific, public policy, and ethical considerations of drug development and commercialization.  Topics include an introduction to basic concepts of chemical structure and bonding as applicable to medicinal chemistry, computational structure-based drug design methods, drug testing and approval process, economics of drug commercialization, and public policy issues. 

This course fulfills the Physical Science and Eloquentia Perfecta 1 Core requirements.

Sinners, Saints, and Stories

Professor Harry Nasuti

THEO 1007-R01 (CRN: 43004), Tuesday & Friday 10:00am-11:15am

This course will explore both the ways that biblical narratives have informed the traditional self-understanding of the western world and the ways in which that self-understanding has been complicated in the modern era. Of particular interest for this course are 1) different biblical presentations of what it means to be a "sinner" or a "saint," 2) the further reflection on these narratives found in post-biblical literature, and 3) the competing narratives that may be found in the modern world.

This course satisfies the Faith and Critical Reason and Eloquentia Perfecta 1 Core requirements.

Mathematics and Democracy

Professor Maura Mast

MATH 1003-R01, Monday & Thursday 8:30am - 9:45am

What is the relationship between mathematics and democracy? This course explores answers to this question from different perspectives. One approach is that members of society must have a certain mathematical literacy for informed participation in their society since people comprehend and analyze numbers and quantitative information, in complicated contexts, on a regular basis. We discuss examples of the numeracy skills needed to evaluate data and information, to analyze statistics, and to understand and formulate quantitative arguments, as well as social justice issues of access to mathematics. Finally, we explore the contributions of mathematics to the development of democratic systems, looking at voting practices and the larger question of how a group can best arrive at a decision. Topics may include decision-making strategies, manipulability of voting systems, fair division and apportionment, and mathematics of competition. This course should be particularly relevant to students interested in political science, philosophy, economics, and sociology.

This course satisfies the Mathematical Reasoning and Eloquentia Perfecta 1 Core requirements.

Gabelli School of Business Manresa Course Offerings

For Gabelli School of Business students, each of these Manresa courses fulfills one of the Gabelli liberal arts or business core requirements.

Ground Floor

Professor Michael McSherry

This introduction to business course challenges students to learn about the environment within which business operates and the various disciplines and key concepts involved. Students are encouraged to study and appreciate how such ingredients are integrated to produce an overall effective organization, as well as become aware of political, social, and environmental forces that change business practices, perceptions, and evolving career tracks.

This course satisfies a Gabelli Business Core requirement.

Lost Interlocutor: Philosophy of Human Nature

Professor Robert J. Parmach

Proceeding by the Socratic Method, this course examines the views of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Descartes, and their intellectual links to contemporary science, religion, and Jesuit education. We investigate salient themes, including existence, knowledge, truth, mind, justice, morality, reality, belief, and love. The course stresses critical spoken dialogue and writing-intensive assignments, many of which consist of interactive (and fun) out-of-class learning experiences. The professor even feeds you at most of these.

This course satisfies the Philosophy of Human Nature Gabelli Liberal Arts Core requirement.

Sinners, Saints, and Stories

Professor Harry Nasuti

This course will explore both the ways that biblical narratives have informed the traditional self-understanding of the western world and the ways in which that self-understanding has been complicated in the modern era. Of particular interest for this course are 1) different biblical presentations of what it means to be a "sinner" or a "saint," 2) the further reflection on these narratives found in post-biblical literature, and 3) the competing narratives that may be found in the modern world.

This course satisfies the Faith and Critical Reason and Eloquentia Perfecta 1 Core requirements