Courses

Courses

LALS 1100 Afro-Latin America
LALS 2000 Cult. & Ident. in French Carib. Lit.
LALS 2005 American Pluralism
LALS 2061 The Media: Hispanic Perspectives
LALS 2700 Cultural History of Latin America
LALS 3314 Literature of the Encounter
LALS 3335 Immigration and Law in the U.S.
LALS 3340 Law and the Hispanic Community
LALS 3341 Labor, Law Relations & Social Problems
LALS 3343 Crime and Minority Rights
LALS 3344 Law, Literature and Latinos
LALS 3346 Latinos and the Media
LALS 3352 Pol. Issues and Procedures: Criminal Law
LALS 3357 Criminal Adjudication
LALS 3358 Process of Criminal Justice
LALS 3359 Crime: A Case Study
LALS 3360 Civil Rights & Minorities
LALS 3401 Study Tour Puebla
LALS 3421 Latin American Fiction
LALS 3435 Brazilian Lit. & Film in Translation
LALS 3437 Afro-Brazilian Film, Literature & Culture
LALS 3438 Dance and Music in the Hispanic Carib.
LALS 3501 Latin American & Latino Music
LALS 3600 Latin America Current Trends
LALS 3601 Latin American Archaeology
LALS 3910 Colonial Cities
LALS 3920 Caribbean Diasporas: London and NYC
LALS 3930 Study Abroad: Contemporary Cuban Culture in Havana Study Tour
LALS 4003 Cult. Hist. of Contemporary Cuba
LALS 4200 Pragmatism & Ideology: Latin America
LALS 4800 Internship: Hispanic Community
LALS 4900 TOPICS IN LATIN & LATINO STUDIES
LALS 4999 INDEPENDENT STUDY
LALS 5001 Latin American & Latino Cultures
LALS 5002 Aztec Art
LALS 5003 Cultural History of Contemporary Cuba
LALS 5004 Hispanic Women Artists
LALS 5004 Testimony and Revolution in Latin America
LALS 5005 Contemporary Cuban Cultural History
LALS 5006 Latino New York
LALS 5007 Working with Survivors of Violence in Latin America
LALS 5008 Cuba: Revolution Literature and Film
LALS 5010 Latin American Migrations
LALS 5035 Latinos & The Media (also cross-listed as COMM 5035)
LALS 5907 Caribbean Diasporas: London and New York
LALS 5908 Brazil and the World

ANTH 33451 Comparative Cultures (4 credits)

This course will survey the diversity of cultures in the world and the processes that have produced similarities and differences among and within various geographic areas. Some of the central topics of discussion include human adaptation and adaptability, social change, modernization and ideas of development in small scale as well as in complex societies today.

ARHI 1103 Intro to Art History America (3 credits)

Since their arrival to the continents over ten thousand years ago, American peoples have responded to their environment by manipulating it, marking it and representing it. In this course, a broad survey, we look at how American peoples have creatively interacted with their environment particularly in the creation of buildings and monuments, beginning with some of the earliest urban experiments, happening over three millennia ago and ending with the present. The first part of the course focuses on indigenous America before 1492; the second half to 1500 onward. Since we are in a city that has undergone enormous environmental manipulation, and is home to an extraordinary number of monuments, the course will have a special focus on New York.

ARHI 2250 Pre-Colombian Art (4 credits)

An introduction to the art and architecture of Central and South America before the arrival of Columbus in 1492. We will concentrate primarily on highly organized urban societies: the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Maya, Aztec, Chavín, Moche and Inka. All these societies used artworks to encode and communication fundamental ideas about the world and place of human beings within in. Because these cultures developed in complete independence from other world cultures—the Americas had limited, if any, contact with peoples from either Europe or Asia from 10,000 BCE until 1492—their artworks often present particular challenges to both western aesthetics and other value systems.

ARHI 4250 Aztec Art (4 credits)

An examination of works of art and architecture created in central Mexico in the 15th and 16th centuries by the people history has dubbed the Aztecs, but who called themselves the Mexica. Particular focus will be paid to the capital city of Tenochtitlan (present–day Mexico City), one of the largest cities in the world in the 16th century, where ecological and political imperatives gave shape to the urban form, architecture, and programs of public monuments. Until 1978, pre-Hispanic Tenochtitlan was known almost exclusively through historical texts, literary works in Nahuatl, the language of the Aztec and works of art, often accidental finds. But since the late 1970s, extensive archeological work has been carried out in the urban core. As an interdisciplinary core course, this course will combine readings in Aztec archeology with interpretations offered by art history and ethnohistory to gain understanding of how different disciplines can shed light (and sometimes reach very different conclusions) over the same set of data. By the end of the course, students will gain an understanding of what kind of questions archeologists, historians and art historians ask, and how they answer them. This disciplinary triumvirate has a public face in New York City, within the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Museum of the American Indian and the American Museum of Natural History, where these respective disciplinary concern shape displays of Aztec works; we will be visiting and working with these collections. As an EP–3 class, the class is focused on class discussion and offers many opportunities to improve skills in speaking and writing.

ARHI 2256 Renaissance in Latin America (4 credits)

The advent of the High Renaissance in Europe coincided with the Spanish conquest of the Americas. Colonists brought European art objects to the New World, and in the 16th century, indigenous peoples of the Americas (once known as the Aztec and the Inka) used these works to inspire their own artistic Renaissance in Latin America. It was a mestizo, or mixed, Renaissance, marrying the great art forms of native America to the best of the European Renaissance. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Baroque and Neoclassical styles in painting and architecture were also adapted and reinterpreted by artists in Latin America. This course looks at the development of this distinct visual culture in Latin America from 1500–1800, with a focus on important urban centers, Mexico City, Puebla, Cuzco and Lima.

ARHI 2257 Modern Latin American Art (4 credits)

In the modern period, Latin American nations, the by–product of European colonization, developed artistic traditions that grew out of their own distinct realities. This course looks at three great shaping forces of modern Latin American art: nationalism, which called on visual art to both create a national identity and to reflect it; modernism, an aesthetic movement that insisted on artistic autonomy; and a tradition of political activism that called on art to be socially engaged. Both nationalism and modernism were forged in Europe, and in translating and adapting modernism to Latin America, artists created hybrid modernities that often were inspired by the living presence (and sometimes involved the participation) of distinct indigenous groups, whose languages and ethnic identities have ancient roots, going well beyond the arrival of the Spanish. In more recent years, the political integrity of Latin American nations has been challenged by oppressive governments and imperialism, often leading artists to oppositional political activism through artworks.

The class will look at the three themes of nationalism, modernism, and resistance as developed and expressed by artists in Lain America. Our lens onto these themes will often be the writings of artists themselves.

COLI 3620 Caribbean Displacements (4 credits)

Comparative analysis of literature from the English–, French–, and Spanish–speaking Caribbean written in and about exile, migration, and diaspora. The experience of exile, migration, and diaspora as it impacts race, gender, sexuality and the formation of national, communal, and personal identity. Colonial and postcolonial cultural theory and film. To include authors such as Césaire, Fanon, Glissant, Naipaul, Kincaid, Condé, Arenas, Laferrière, Obejas,Valdés, Santos–Febres, and Díaz.

COLI 3910 US Latino Literature & Film (4 credits)

An examination of the major topics and genres of contemporary Latina/o filmmaking in the United States, this course will focus on topics such as the representation of alternative histories, racial and border identities, contemporary migrations, women’s lives, Latinos in Hollywood, and the performance of masculinity, and the construction of community and place in Latina/o films. It will explore the ways U.S. Latina/o filmmakers have appropriated cinematic conventions from genres as diverse as the documentary, the western, the coming–of–age story, the melodrama, and the musical.

COLI 4018 Cuba: Revol, Lit & Film (4 credits)

This interdisciplinary capstone course will study the representation of the Cuban revolutionary process in literature, history, and film. It will explore some of the major topics on the Cuban revolutionary process from the vantage point of historical, literary and cinematic accounts: the relationship of intellectuals to the state, the revision of the past as antecedent to the Cuban revolution and its policies, the place of race, gender and sexuality in revolutionary culture, the Mariel exodus and the revolution’s relationship to Cuban diasporic communities, the critique of revolutionary rhetoric during the post–Soviet "special period" and issues related to consumption, gender, sexuality, race, urban development and subjectivity during the current period of economic and cultural transition from socialism. It will use an interdisciplinary historical, literary and cinematic approach to examine the Cuban revolutionary process and will offer as a complement to the course an optional Spring Study–Tour of Havana, LALS 3930, "Contemporary Cuban Culture in Havana." The course will be conducted in English with texts in Spanish and English translation, and will count toward the major and minor in Spanish.

ENGL 4184 Postwar U.S. Lit & Cult (4 credits)

This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and countercultural movements of the post–WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti–war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.

HIST 1400 Understanding Historical Change: Latin America (3 credits)

This course meets the requirement for a freshman Eloquentia Perfecta seminar. The course is also an introduction to major issues in Latin American history and an introduction to basic skills in historical analysis. Topics may include: the invasion and conquest era, the Spanish efforts to transform indigenous lives in the 16th through 18th centuries, the Mexican Revolution, the CIA’s invasion and overthrow of the Guatemalan government and the impact of late 20th/early 21st century neo–liberalism .

HIST 3950 Latino History (4 credits)

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, sexuality, and citizenship. Specific topics include: United States colonial expansion and its effects on the population of Latin America; Mexican–Americans, and the making of the West; colonialism and the Puerto Rican Diaspora; Caribbean revolutions and the Cuban–American community; and globalization and recent Latina/o migrations (Dominicans, Colombians).

HIST 3955 Slavery Freedom/Atlantic World (4 credits)

The course will cover multiple regions of the Atlantic World – Latin America and the Caribbean, the U.S., Africa, and Europe – to understand slavery and freedom as intersecting global themes across space and time. Starting with indigenous and African slavery in the Spanish and Portuguese empires, we will understand how political and economic institutions, racial ideas, and even Enlightenment concepts about liberty informed a global history of human bondage. The course will look at a variety of materials, from slave narratives to court cases, databases, film, and literature to understand the experience of slavery and the fight for freedom through the perspectives of slaves as well as slave owners, slave traders, and abolitionists. We will also consider the development of African diasporic cultures in the Americas and the legacy of slavery in current debates about memory, reparations, and human trafficking.

HIST 3965 Colonial Latin America (4 credits)

This course is an overview of Spanish America from the late 15th through the early 19th century. Not termed ‘colonies’ until the end of this time, these vast areas were known as ‘viceroyalties,’ or kingdoms, and were to be governed in the same manner as the crown’s vassals in the Iberian Peninsula. We will concentrate on what are called the "core" areas of the Spanish empire in the Americas—that is the Viceroyalties of Peru (which in the 17th century took in present–day Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and parts of Colombia, Chile and Argentina) and New Spain (which included Mexico and much of Central America).The overarching theme is how a new ‘colonial’ society was created through the interaction of imposed Spanish institutions and their reinterpretation by indigenous and African peoples. Within this context we will examine issues such as myths about the conquest, Spanish efforts to transform indigenous people, the impact and uptake of literacy, the question of ‘race,’ how justice and law functioned in colonial society, indigenous rebellion, and independence.

HIST 3968 Mexico (4 credits)

The course covers the history of Mexico from pre–Colombian times to the present. It underscores major events (such as the Spanish conquest, independence, and the revolution) and long historical periods like the colonial era, the turbulent 1800s, nation–building in the 1900s, and U.S.–Mexico relations. It further seeks to explain how the colonial legacy, race, the state, and migrations have shaped Mexican culture and identity.

HIST 3969 Latin America and the U.S. (4 credits)

This course will be a survey of the history of the Latin America policy of the United States and the impact of such policy on the Latin American countries.

HIST 3974: Spaniards and Incas (4 credits)

This course traces the history of interaction between native peoples of the Andes and the Europeans who invaded, conquered and settled there. At the time of the Spanish invasion, the Inca Empire was the largest empire in the world, stretching for thousands of miles along the Andean mountains. But it was an empire full of ironies: it had the largest highway system in the world (even longer that famous Roman road system), yet the Inca did not have wheeled vehicles. It was an enormously sophisticated empire, governing hundreds of different language and ethnic groups, but without money or markets as we know them. It had a complex system of food warehouses filled with freeze–dried food that ensured that even in times of drought or other adversity, the entire empire had substantial food, yet this was managed without benefit of written language as we know it. This is the reason why our knowledge of pre–conquest Inca history comes mostly from post–conquest chronicles, written primarily by Spaniards. Our examination of Spain begins with the completion of the Spanish Reconquista (the defeat of Muslim Granada by the Catholic Kings) and the formation of the hybrid socio–cultural order at the end of the 15th century. The Spanish Empire was the first of Europe’s globalized empires and the first modern archival state, with a vast bureaucracy maintaining detailed records. In this course, we focus on a series of overlapping issues: the organization of both Inca and Spanish societies before the invasion; how each empire maintained political control over its subjects or citizens; conversion to Christianity and popular expressions of religiosity; the importance of urban life for Spain and its empire, and the legal and political cultures that developed in the colonial world.

HIST 3977 Latin American History through Film (4 credits)

This course offers an overview of film from and about Latin America. There are three overlapping and complementary goals for the class: one, to offer an overview of Latin American history so that the historical accuracy, and more importantly, the historicity of the films can be examined; two, to query the use of film as an historical text, that is, as a kind of primary source; and three, to look at the history of cinema in Latin America. By historicity, I refer to the particular understandings of time, knowledge, and being that make the past meaningful in different ways to different people. We will address questions such as: How do people remember or create history? What are their social and cultural understandings of the past? How are those interpretations put into film? How do Latin American filmmakers use their craft to critique society?

HIST 4510 Conquest, Conversion, and Conscience: Spain and Catholicism in the Americas (4 credits)

Spain’s conquest of the Americas and the forced conversion of millions of indigenous peoples to Christianity have rightly been denounced as brutal, but frequently the condemnation of Spain is predicated on the assumption that invasion and conversion were uniformly supported. While the conquest and forced conversion were justified as rescuing indigenous peoples from the tyranny of their own rulers or from their own sinfulness of cannibalism and bestiality, those same policies of conquest and conversion were also subject to intense scrutiny on moral and ethical grounds by Spaniards themselves. Indeed, Spain is the only great imperial power that halted all imperial ventures to debate the ethics of conquest and conversion. In this course we will closely examine three overlapping issues (conquest, conversion, and the king’s conscience) through a series of case studies and the philosophical and ethical debates they gave rise to. We will ask questions of the readings that Spaniards asked themselves, such as: What justifies state sovereignty claims over indigenous peoples? What justifies conquest and overrule? What constitutes tyranny? What kind of sovereignty does God sanction? What is legitimate conversion? Close reading and analysis of primary sources will be emphasized.

HIST 4853 Sem: US Civilizing Effort Latin Ame (4 credits)

Students in this undergraduate seminar will do research in primary sources to analyze different aspects of the US "civilizing mission" in Latin America. The course will concentrate in the period from 1898 to the eve of the Great Depression. We will discuss the efforts of U.S. diplomats, missionaries, business people, educators and the like to "civilize" Latin Americans, and the reaction of Latin Americans to such efforts.

HIST 4952 Latin America: an Ethnohistory (4 credits)

Ethnohistory is an interdisciplinary field which brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines. Ethnohistorical methodology draws primarily from history and anthropology (linguistics, ethnography, & archeology) but also includes art history and social geography. Ethnohistorians privilege "those analyses and interpreta­tions that explore the experience, orga­nization, and identities of indigenous, diasporic, and minority peoples that otherwise elude the histories and anthro­pologies of nations, states, and colonial empires" (American Society for Ethnohistory brochure, 2007). In this course we will focus on the ethnohistories of indigenous peoples of Latin America.

HIST 5910 Law and Empire in the Iberian Atlantic World (4 credits)

Law and Empire in the Iberian World explores the centrality of legal practices in the expansion of the Iberian Empire, a legal culture which produced the world’s largest trove of archival documents. Topics will include the legal cultures in early modern Spain and the Americas; the debate over just war and the legality of conquest; how indigenous peoples were legally incorporated into the Spanish crown, and how they used law to their advantage (including establishing legally founded towns, litigation within the Spanish court system, use of wills and other legal documents); legal questions of honor & ethnicity as related to marriage and office holding; the legal relationship between the American Viceroyalties and the crown of Castile; and place of role of law and litigation in creating civil society.

LALS 1100 Afro-Latin America (3 credits)

An introduction to the central themes in the study of people of African descent in Latin America. In considering race and blackness in L. America we will pay attention to the flexibility of racial categories, the importance of gender and class, and the role of visual images in the making of racial identities.

LALS 2000 Cult & Ident Fren Carib Lit (3 credits)

In this course we will read contemporary francophone literature from Martinique, Guadeloupe and Haiti, translated to English, in an effort to familiarize ourselves with the colonial and post–colonial history of the region, its cultural richness and its literary modes.

LALS 2005 American Pluralism (4 credits)

Contemporary and historical studies in the racial and ethnic diversity of American (U.S.) society with a special emphasis on the issues of race relations, migration and immigration and their relation to either (1) the distribution of economic or political power or (2) their cultural manifestations in literature, the arts and/or religion.

LALS 2061 The Media: Hispanic Perspectives

LALS 2700 Cultural History of Latin America

LALS 3314 Literature of the Encounter

LALS 3335 Immigration and Law in the U.S.

LALS 3340 Law and the Hispanic Community

LALS 3341 Labor, Law Relations & Social Problems (4 credits)

An analysis of the major labor problems in urban areas using a problem–solving approach. This course explores the roles of labor law in the establishment of labor unions, minimum wages, overtime, compensation, equal pay for equal work, age discrimination and occupational safety and health.

LALS 3343 Crime & Minority Rights (4 credits)

This course is designed to present an overview of the problems for decision in the promulgation, invocation, and administration of a law of crimes. Topics include theories of crime, the purpose of punishment, and specific types of crimes. The rights of minorities will be discussed within the context of a viable criminal law.

LALS 3344 Crime, Literature & Latinos (4 credits)

This course examines the relationship between criminal law and literature. We will study how writers use stories about the law to express ideas of humanity. We will also examine the interplay between law and morality and discuss how authors have viewed the criminal justice system, with particular emphasis on the experience of Latinos. The reading list will include criminal law and criminal procedure law, as well as works by Latino fiction writers such as Bodega Dreams, Carlito's Way, and House of the Spirits, and by non–Latino writers such as Billy Budd and the The Trial.

LALS 3346 Latinos and the Media (4 credits)

This is a seminar and workshop on the impact and influence of the news media on Latinos and their image. The course will analyze, discuss and develop reports on negative labels, stereotypes, and cultural and social typecasting. Sources such as films and books will be examined to debate ways to transform and reinvent images.

LALS 3352 POL Issu & Proc Crim Law (4 credits)

Utilizing the casebook and problem–solving approaches, this course will study the manner in which criminal laws are created and the effect on minority communities throughout the country. The course will examine such issues as the scope and nature of criminal liability, the insane defense and other defenses to crimes, as well as the purpose and effectiveness of traditional sentencing.

LALS 3357 Criminal Adjudication (4 credits)

An exploration of trial advocacy through an examination of a case from its inception to its conclusion. Examines each stage of the criminal justice process, issues related to the rights of minorities, the role race and the police play in the system. Course will culminate in a mock trial after analyzing issues from the substantive study of criminal law and procedure.

LALS 3358 Process of Criminal Justice (4 credits)

Course deals with the matters that bar prosecution including immunity, double jeopardy and mental incapacity. Other topics include plea–bargaining, time and manner of trial, basic prosecution of trial, roles of the defendant, prosecutor and judge and appeals process. Emphasis will be on the impact of process on minorities.

LALS 3359 Crime: A Case Study (4 credits)

An exploration of trial advocacy through an examination of a case from its inception to its conclusion. Examines each stage of the criminal justice process, issues related to the rights of minorities, the role race and the police play in the system. Course will culminate in a mock trial after analyzing issues arising from the substantive study of criminal law and procedure.

LALS 3360 Civil Rights & Minorities (4 credits)

An analysis of constitutional law and civil rights legislation and their impact on minority groups in the United States. Using a historical perspective, focus will be on such topics as busing, affirmative action, public accommodations, voting, housing and employment.

LALS 3400 Social Reality: Bogota (1 credits)

This one week course in the capital of Colombia, Bogota, will explore contemporary social reality in one of Latin America's most representative and vibrant cities, with special emphasis on the way this nation's armed conflict has impacted its population and its modernization process and on current conflict resolution and civic participation through social service–learning projects.

LALS 3401 Latin Amer Soc Reality: Pueblo (1 credits)

One–week study tour to Puebla, Mexico. The course will explore the socioeconomic reality of Puebla, Mexico. The city is the main source of Mexican immigrants to New York and has sites important for every major period of Mexican history. The tour will include lectures on history and contemporary issues as well as visits to sites important to the history and culture of Mexico.

LALS 3421 Latin American Fiction (4 credits)

A study of Latin American narrative forms. Selected readings from major Latin American writers. Topics such as unity, diversity, magic realism, the search for a national identity, literature and underdevelopment, etc. will be examined in their social and literary context.

LALS 3435 Brazilian Lit & Film (3 credits)

This course examines some of Brazil's best known cinematic and literary classics in translation. We start with Jose` de Alencar's "Iracema" continuing through to works that treat the military dictatorships in Brazil during the 1960's and 1970's. Taught in English.

LALS 3437 Afro Brazilian Film Lit Cult (4 credits)

This course examines central themes in Afro–Brazilian film, literature, and culture. We will study the depiction of slavery the depiction of slavery during the construction of syncretic religions such as Candomble and Macumba, the experience of Afro–Brazilian women, the image of favelas or shantytowns and conclude with Afro–Brazilian woman, the music and performance.

LALS 3438 Dance and Music in the Hispanic Carib. (4 credits)

An introduction to the dance traditions of Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic with an emphasis on the position of dance in the search and maintenance of identity. We will explore the issues of ethnicity and social class while learning some Hispanic dance practices and we will reflect upon the persistence and transformation of dance and music in the context of the Caribbean.

LALS 3501 Latin American & Latino Music (4 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the music of Latin America and Latinos in the United States. In addition to studying major genres and styles, we will also explore some of the themes and issues that have affected Latin America and Latino popular music in the 20th century. These include music and mestizaje, ethnic, regional, national and Latino identities and the like.

LALS 3600 Latin America: Current Trends (4 credits)

The objective of this course is to help students develop the basic tools for political analysis in the context of an overview of the current political environment and economic circumstances of Latin America's main players. The course will provide information and guidelines for understanding the present situation within each of the main influential countries in the region and the interrelationship among these countries. The relationship with the United States and other extraregional players with increasingly important roles in the region, as well as the influence of the Organization of American States will also be explored.

LALS 3601 Latin American Archeology (4 credits)

Latin America is one of the great culture areas of the ancient and modern worlds. The peoples of the region developed unique civilizations long before the arrival of Europeans. This course considers the religion, hieroglyphic writing systems, architecture, political economy, myth, and history of pre–Colombian cultures of Mesoamerica, South America and the Caribbean. We examine the latest archaeological research and primary ethnohistoric documents to study the Maya, Zapotec, Aztec, Moche, Inca, and Taino culture. A broad historical and geographical sweep allows us a deeper understanding of how the Latin American past continues to shape the present.

LALS 3910 Colonial Cities (4 credits)

A multi–disciplinary seminar with a focus on cities and municipal life in colonial Spanish America, beginning with their origins in Iberian patterns and indigenous American settings. A particular emphasis is given to political ideas embedded in urban practices. Readings come from anthropology, art history and history.

LALS 3920 Caribbean Diasporas: London and NYC (4 credits)

This course will compare the experience of immigration and the formation of diasporic communities in two cities with strong connections to the Caribbean. It will explore the causes and pace of immigration and the complexity of transnational identities and politics. The topics discussed in depth include: New York and London’s ties to the slave economies of the Caribbean; major Caribbean political exiles in London and New York (José Martí, C.L.R. James); and the tensions between national and diasporic identities in the two cities.

LALS 3930 Study Abroad: Contemporary Cuban Culture in Havana Study Tour (1 credit)

Havana, one of the world’s most historically significant and hauntingly beautiful cities, has long been the center of Cuban culture and an exporter of cultural forms to the rest of the world. This one–week one–credit spring study–tour course will explore the city’s vibrant contemporary cultural scene in music, art, dance, literature and film and give students a lived sense of the issues, topics and concerns addressed by contemporary Cuban artists in innovative new forms that respond both to local conditions of economic transition and to a globalized world market.

In Havana, Casa de las Américas, the island’s premier cultural institute, will be our host and the city will be our classroom. Meetings in January and February prior to departure for the tour will introduce students to Cuban politics and history and prepare them to be knowledgeable guests. The group will be led by Prof. Arnaldo Cruz–Malavé, Director of the Latin American and Latino Institute at Fordham University.

LALS 4003 Cult. Hist. of Contemporary Cuba (4 credits)

This study–tour course will explore the socio–economic transformations that have shaped Cuba since the beginning of the revolutionary period in 1959 to the present ‘special period’ of economic and political reform through the on–site study of its literature, art, music, cinema, and history. Special application and early registration required.
Note: Only offered in summer sessions.

LALS 4200 Pragmatism & Ideology: Latin America (4 credits)

As democracies began to consolidate, leftist ideologies deeply influenced the governments of the major Latin American countries. Few countries avoided this tendency. Concurrently, regional political analysts wondered whether Latin America was actually turning to the left. However, the political reality was that pragmatism was replacing ideology, as left and right ideological polarization redesigned the political focal point into a convergence model where economic growth, stability, and social justice would play the central role, regardless of specific ideological preferences. Analysis and discussions will include these countries’ present situation and outlook, and the impact of weakened democratic institutions, drug trafficking and poverty on the shift toward political pragmatism.

LALS 4800 Internship: Hispanic Community

Supervised placement in government agencies, business, education and the arts. For students interested in work experience directly related to their studies and professional goals.

LALS 4900 TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN & LATINO STUDIES (4 credits)

Intensive consideration of central issues in the study of Latin American and the Latino populations of the United States. On a given semester the seminar will focus on several of the following topics: "National Identity, Gender and Race," "History and Fiction," "Popular Culture," "Immigration and Cultural Displacements," "Revolutions in/and Literature," "Politics and Languages," and "Border Cultures." Advanced study of a Latin American or Latino topic. Must be approved by Chair/Associate Chair.

LALS 4999 Independent Study (4 credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

LALS 5001 Latin American & Latino Cultures (4 credits)

An interdisciplinary course that offers students multiple perspectives on central issues in Latin American and Latino Studies. Guest lecturers from various disciplines, such as history, literature, anthropology, art history, sociology and theology provide students an overview of current debates in the field.

LALS 5002 Aztec Art (4 credits)

This course will examine the art created by the Aztecs, one of the last of the two great pre-Colombian cultures. Holding sway over much of Mexico at the beginning of the 16th century, the Aztec Empire was brought to collapse by the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors. We will focus on the primary sources, both Aztec and Spanish, as keys to understanding the art.

LALS 5003 Cultural History of Contemporary Cuba (4 credits)

This course explores the socio–economic and cultural transformations that have shaped Cuba since the beginning of the revolutionary period in 1959 to the present "special period" of economic and political reform through the study of literature, art, music, cinema and history. Also offered as a summer study–tour course held in Havana.

LALS 5004 Hispanic Women Artists (4 credits)

This course examines the contributions of both Latina and Latin American women to the visual arts of the 20th century. It begins with the pioneering work of artist such as Kahlo, Malfatti, Tarsila do Amaral, Izquierdo and Clack, and traces how their various challenges to tradition of subject matter, form and gender have shaped the work of contemporary artists in both Latin American and the United States.

LALS 5004 Testimony and Revolution in Latin America (4 credits)

This is a class about how self–consciously radical or 'revolutionary' working people (workers and peasants), as well as those middle class protagonists who claim to speak on behalf of the subaltern, see themselves through autobiography/testimonies and how others (historians and social scientists) have chosen to see and represent them. The successful completion of this class should enable participants: to identify and analyze the ways in which history and experience have been ‘constructed’ by the authors of testimonies; to understand how intermediaries, editors and mediators shape the construction of testimonial narratives; be familiar with some of the methodologies and critical perspectives employed by historians, economists, political scientists and anthropologists in their search to understand the history of other peoples and places; understand how theoretical perspectives have reshaped our understandings of the past; reflect on the ways in which the changing political social and economic environment within which western social scientists operate shapes research questions and priorities and the categories used to understand unfamiliar settings.

LALS 5005 Contemporary Cuban Cultural History (4 credits)

An exploration of the cultural transformations that have shaped Cuban society from the Revolution of 1959 to the present–day "special period" of economic change through the examination of its literature and film.

LALS 5006 Latino New York (4 credits)

New York as represented, imagined, and constructed by Spanish and Latin American immigrant and exile writers and by native Latino New Yorkers through culture (literature, film, music, performance art, visual arts and daily life). A review of research on Latino New York cultures and a cultural history of Latino New York, this course will also be conducted as an interdisciplinary seminar where students will be able to engage in and share their research on some aspect of the cultures of Latino New York.

LALS 5007 Working with Survivors of Violence in Latin America (4 credits)

The need to bridge academic knowledge with applied programs when working with survivors of violence enhances the basic need of solidarity with other human beings, victimized by natural and political disasters and their consequences, and encourages us to learn more about their experiences, as we attempt to try to find better ways of living together. There is a general assumption underlying the discussion of topics that action is necessary, and we will be reviewing different types of programs as implemented by different local and international organizations in different Latin American countries. This course will consider both theoretical and applied approaches, and will be centered on ways of thinking and actions that bridge these two responses. Lastly, it will give the students the opportunity of becoming more familiar with the work inside the Latino communities within the U.S., and with the work overseas within communities in Colombia, Guatemala, Peru and Bolivia.

LALS 5008 Cuba: Revolution, Literature and Film (4 credits)

The evolution of Cuban culture as seen in literature and film from the early years of the revolution of 1959 to the contemporary post–Soviet "special period." Literary texts from writers such as Barnet, Morejon, Desnoes, Piñera, Lezama Lima, Arenas, Valdés, Ponte and Pedro Juan Gutiérrez will be studied, as well as representative films from directors such as Gutiérrez Alea, Solá and Pérez. Conducted in English, though coursework may be done in Spanish at the request of student.

LALS 5010 Latin American Migrations (4 credits)

Geographical, cultural and linguistic migration has been a major theme of Latin American fiction since its very beginnings. Throughout the 20th Century, the myth of entering modernity through geographical displacement became the cause of major transformations in the Latin American landscape: from the gradual emptying out of rural areas to the unplanned explosions of cities into megalopolis of overwhelming complexity. In recent decades, even more complex dislocations of culture and identity have flourished with the increasing number of people leaving their country of origin to try their luck elsewhere, either within the continent or in the US, Europe or Asia. In dialogue with recent critical discourse on migration, racism, globalization, hybridity and transnationalism, the fiction and film analyzed in this course foster a discussion on the rapidly changing dynamics of the multiple cultural and linguistic identities of increasingly nomad Latin Americans of different social, racial and linguistic backgrounds.

LALS 5035 Latinos & The Media (also cross–listed as COMM 5035) (4 credits)

A hands–on reporting and writing workshop with a focus on how the mainstream U.S. media covers Latinos and Latino issues, such as immigration, assimilation, class divisions and cultural influences. The class will report on how the print and on–line media shape Latino images based on selected newspapers, and network and cable news programs. Students will conduct interviews and research in the field and will report and write six news or feature articles. The class will read, discuss and write critiques on eight books (nonfiction, fiction, memoirs) and magazine articles. The course will offer a couple of introductory classes on the nuts and bolts of journalism. We will discuss writing styles, syntax/voice and ethics to prepare all students, regardless of their major, for story assignments.

LALS 5907 Caribbean Diasporas: London and New York (4 credits)

This course will compare the experience of immigration and the formation of diasporic communities in two cities with strong connections to the Caribbean. It will explore the causes and pace of immigration and the complexity of trans–national identities and politics. The topics discussed in depth include New York and London’s ties to the slave economies of the Caribbean; major Caribbean political exiles in London and New York (José Martí, C. L. R. James); and the tensions between national and diasporic identities in the two cities.

LALS 5908 Brazil and the World (4 credits)

This course will examine key themes in Brazilian history and culture from an interdisciplinary perspective, ranging from the colonial period to independence. Topics include the Portuguese conquest of native Brazilians; the introduction of African slavery; religious life; explorations of the frontier; and nationalism. We will read historical studies, novels, essays and travel accounts. We will also screen Brazilian films that touch on these questions.

POSC 2610 Intro to Comparative Politics (4 credits)

This course involves the systematic study and comparison of the world's political systems. It seeks to explain differences between as well as similarities among countries including the United States. Comparative politics is particularly interested in exploring patterns, processes, and regularities among political systems. It looks for trends, for changes in patterns, and tries to develop general propositions or hypotheses that describe and explain these trends.

POSC 3645 Politics of Immigration (4 credits)

The course examines the politics of contemporary immigration. Topics include the construction of citizen and alien, the (re)negotiation of immigrant sexuality and sexual identity, the racialization of naturalization, the family and immigration law, the formation of social movements around immigrant rights, and a comparative analysis of immigration policies in the U.S. and those in Europe.

POSC 4020 Place Space & Immigrant Cities (4 credits)

This course will introduce students to the main issues and current debates on immigrant minorities in large urban areas. Due to their density, cities represent microcosms of interaction and identity formation among and between different minority and majority groups. This often manifests itself spatially, as certain neighborhoods become areas of residence and territorial concentration for immigrant minorities. In the process of settling, immigrants also start identifying strongly with their spaces of settlement. This course will trace the historical patterns of this process, as well as explore its contemporary manifestations, as cities are being rediscovered and "gentrified," rendering their neighborhoods into fierce battlegrounds of spatial contestation.

SOCI 3418 Contemp Immig Global Persp (4 credits)

Over the past decades, immigration has again transformed the United States. It is also producing significant changes in other countries, from the European nations that used to send their citizens to the United States more than a century ago, to oil–rich Middle Eastern states and developing nations. This class explores multiple questions related to immigration: Why do people migrate across international borders? Can states control migration, especially "unwanted" migrants? We examine the policies that let some people in, while keeping others out and then consider incorporation, the process by which foreign "outsiders" become integrated in their new home. Are immigrants and their children becoming part of the U.S. mainstream? What is the mainstream? The arrival of newcomers also affects the cultural, economic, political and social dynamics of the countries and communities that receive them. How do sociologists evaluate and theorize immigrant integration? Finally, the course looks at topical debates around membership, including citizenship. The large–scale movement of people raises questions about belonging, nationality, and social cohesion.

SOCI 3427 Hispanics/Latinos in the USA (4 credits)

Explores the Hispanic mosaic in the U.S. Special emphasis is given to Hispanic education, culture and assimilation; the political significance of Hispanics; issues of gender, color and race; and work and the changing economy.

SOCI 4020 Place Space & Immigrant Cities (4 credits)

This course will introduce students to the main issues and current debates on immigrant minorities in large urban areas. Due to their density, cities represent microcosms of interaction and identity formation among and between different minority and majority groups. This often manifests itself spatially, as certain neighborhoods become areas of residence and territorial concentration for immigrant minorities. In the process of settling, immigrants also start identifying strongly with their spaces of settlement. This course will trace the historical patterns of this process, as well as explore its contemporary manifestations, as cities are being rediscovered and "gentrified," rendering their neighborhoods into fierce battlegrounds of spatial contestation.

SOCI 4408 Diversity in Amer Society (4 credits)

An examination of historical and contemporary diversity in the United States. Diversity is defined according to ethnicity, race, religion, class, and other relevant social groups. A comparison of the situation of old and new ethnic and immigrant groups will be made with special attention to factors affecting integration into the society.

SPAN 2001 Spanish Lang Literature (4 credits)

Study of selected literary texts and review of pertinent grammatical structures, textual analysis, composition, and conversation. Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 2301 Advanced for Spanish Speakers (3 credits)

An advanced review of grammar for students with bilingual experiences in English and Spanish. Study of selected literary texts. Textual analysis, continued development of written and oral skills. Prerequisite:

SPAN 1801 or Placement.

SPAN 2305 Spanish Conversation and Composition (4 credits)

Intensive practice of the spoken and written language with emphasis on proper use of idioms and buildings of vocabulary based on topics of interest and relevance. A basic course for prospective majors and minors, not open to Spanish native speakers.

SPAN 2500 Approaches to Literature (4 credits)

A basic course in Spanish literature. Close readings in the major forms, prose fiction, poetry and drama, and an introduction to the varieties of critical strategies for reading them.

SPAN 2640 Spanish & New York City

This course works to achieve greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding of the Spanish–speaking world. We will examine the Latin Americans and Latino experience in NYC through a variety of written and visual texts. Students will work in community to improve their language skills and cultural understanding in a highly contextualized environment. Community service required.

SPAN 3001 Spain: Literature and Culture Survey (4 credits)

A broad survey of Spanish culture through the study of some of its major literary figures and texts. The course will examine representative texts from important artistic movements in Spain, such as the Renaissance, the baroque, neoclassicism, romanticism, realism and postmodernism. By the end of the course, students will be able to define the main characteristics of these movements and will be familiar with important literary figures, such as Garcilaso de la Vega, Calderón de la Barca, Lope de Vega, Moratín, Bécquer, Larra, Leopoldo Alas, Pardo Bazán, Antonio Machado, Unamuno, Ramón Sénder, Aleixandre and Martín Gaite. Students will also be familiar with Spanish history and its relationship to the cultural field.

SPAN 3002 Latin American Literature and Culture Survey (4 credits)

This course offers a survey of the history and cultures of the diverse Latin American societies as it is shown through literature, fine art, music and film. We approach the subject chronologically, and so we study pre–Colombian indigenous cultures, the Spanish conquest and colonization, the independence struggles and the formation of Latin American republics, the 20th Century's many discourses of "modernization", the Cuban revolution, the military dictatorships of the southern cone, and the increasing migration of late 20th Century. The objective is to have the student develop a historical understanding of the various Latin American cultural processes.

SPAN 3066 SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN FILM (4 credits)

A panoramic view of the cinema of Hispanic America and Brazil, from the Golden Age of Mexican film to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on students' use of the language itself of film studies, as well as on the connections between transnational networks of filmmakers and the emergence of pan–Latin American identities.

SPAN 3075 Crimen Fiction in Hispanic Literature

SPAN 3210 The Transatlantic Picaresque (4 credits)

Exploration of the origins of this uniquely entertaining genre, its most exemplary manifestations in Spain, and its transatlantic resonance in the New World. Texts include Lazarillo de Tormes, El Buscón, Don Catrín de la Fachenda, El lazarillo de ciegos caminantes, and others.

SPAN 3250 God, Gold, and Glory (4 credits)

In–depth examination of Colonial narratives of exploration and conquest. Comparative study of text and film representations of this powerful moment of Spanish imperialism.

SPAN 3420 Modern Spanish Poetry (4 credits)

Study, explanation , interpretation of the creative new burst of the great poets of the 20th century Spain, of the various poetic movements which influenced them. Particular attention is given to the 19th century's prehistory of the 20th century Spanish poetry, the poetic "isms" of those periods and their influences. The study of Spanish metrics also will demonstrate their relevance to each poet.

SPAN 3426 MODERN HISPANIC THEATRE (4 credits)

Through the study of a series of contemporary plays, this course addresses theatre as testimony to social and political changes in the Hispanic world during the Twentieth century. From pre–to–post Franco Spain, and from the naturalist drama in the early Twentieth century to postmodern experiments in the theatre of the absurd in Argentina, we will focus on issues of rebellion, abuse of power, and tyrannies.

SPAN 3427 Hispanics/Latinos in the USA (4 credits)

SPAN 3500 Literature of Discovery (4 credits)

In–depth examination of four essential chroniclers of Spanish–American discovery: Colón, Cabeza de Vaca, Cortés, and las Casas. Exploration of the concept of discovery, supported by study of several foremost critics of colonial literature.

SPAN 3511 Spanish Civil War (4 credits)

This course examines how the Spanish Civil War has been represented in Spanish Cultural Production both during the war and in the decades following. Known by some as the "last great cause," the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939) offers an extraordinary opportunity to explore the intersection of art and politics in a moment of extreme intensity inside and outside the Spanish nation. This class will examine how the war is represented in diverse media: film, poetry, novel, photography, posters, letters, memoirs, drawings, theater and discourse. It will look at the myths, themes, symbols, topics and styles that predominate in literature and the art of war. It will examine how the war is lived, represented and remembered from diverse perspectives (the soldier’s, the foreigner’s, women’s, children’s, etc.) and in different periods.

SPAN 3550 Expressing the Colonies (4 credits)

This course will consider Colonial texts following the age of discovery and conquest. Exploration of Sor Juana, el Inca Garcilaso, Balbuena, Vázquez de Espinosa, and others will seek to identify how the writings contributed to the expression of the newly established colonies and institutions.

SPAN 3401 Modern Spanish Fiction (4.000 Credits)

Spanish novel and/or short story. Major figures in 20th–century Spanish fiction. Authors may include: Baroja, Perez de Ayala, Sender, Cela, Matute, Delibes, Goytisolo and Tusquets.

SPAN 3582 New York in Latino Literature & Film

New York as represented by Spanish and Latin American exile writers and native Latino New Yorkers. The city as a metaphor for artistic creation in a global world, a center for a cosmopolitan Spanish and Latin American diasporic avant–garde, and as constructed by the Latino imagination in writing, film, and performance art. To include authors such as Martí, Lorca, Burgos, Thomas, Piñero, Arenas, Braschi, Hijuelos, and Leguizamo; and filmmakers such as Ichaso, Morales, and Troyano.

SPAN 3610 Children’s Gaze in Latin American Literature (4 credits)

In this course we analyze novels, short stories and poetry whose subject voice is a child or an adolescent. We study how this subject position is constructed and how a particular image of the world is created as a result of the child’s gaze. The themes to be discussed are the creation of imaginary worlds, play as a way of understanding and acting, the power of emotional attachments, and the awakenings of sexual desire.

SPAN 3642 Spanish American Literature and Popular Music

SPAN 3701 Spanish American Women Writers (4 credits)

This course presents a panoramic selection of narrative and poetry by 20th Century Spanish American women writers. Theoretical texts on feminism and women's writing will also be included in relation to the chosen literary texts. Some of the themes explored in this course are patriarchy and authoritarianism, motherhood, gender identity and writing with/about the body.

SPAN 3710 Contemporary Latin American Fiction (4 credits)

This course presents major trends in Latin American fiction with particular emphasis on writers publishing in the 1990’s and 2000s. Major short novels and stories from various Latin American countries are studied, focusing on themes such as migration, transnationalism, memory, end–of–the –century politics of identity, and the Latin American writer’s increasing professionalization.

SPAN 3730 Writing Violence: Peru 1980–2000 (4 credits)

This course aims to have students reflect about political violence – its causes, its logic and its consequences – by means of a thorough study of the Peruvian armed conflict occurred between 1980 and 2000. This is a highly interdisciplinary course in which historical readings will be combined with theoretical reflections about violence in order to analyze the esthetic symbolizations of the conflict made in Peruvian literature, film and fine art.

SPAN 3755 Spanish American Literature and Globalization

The course explores our current era of intense globalization, the expansion of transnational network of global capital via technology and mass media through Latin American literature and films. It discusses the economic, political and security challenges created by globalization and the impact of technology in Latin America.

SPAN 3770 Memory & Postmemory in Chile (4 credits)

This course will explore artifacts and movements of cultural memory — literature, criticism, film, photography, and other media — that illuminate efforts in Chile to come to terms with the country’s recent dictatorial past. We will also discuss these artifacts in light of the idea of "postmemory:" how affiliations to, and representations of, this past are (re)constructed in the present and projected into the future. The course will meet once a week during the semester, and then include an optional, one–credit, two–week–long trip to Santiago, Chile immediately after the semester ends.

SPAN 3809 Argentine Literature and Film (4 credits)

The course will examine in Argentina the fruitful dialogue between literature and film. Analysis of the writers who incorporated into their writing procedures derived from film and created new models of representing reality. Among the authors to be explored are: Manuel Puig, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortatzar, Adolfo Bioy Casares, Eduardo Sacheri, Guillermo Martinez.

SPAN 3820, "Hispanic Caribbean literature and film" (4 credits)

Major topics and authors in Hispanic Caribbean literature and film: the Caribbean in transatlantic perspective, as a zone for transculturation and contact, encounters and clashes among indigenous, European, Asian and African populations, planters and slaves, over issues of gender, sexuality, religion and race; as an Afro–Latin American and pan–Africanist cultural space; as the site of the first black and the first socialist revolutions in the Americas, a site for revolutionary utopias, heterotopias, and authoritarian regimes; and as a purveyor of exilic, migratory and global diasporic cultural trends. To include authors such as Martí, Palés, Guillén, Carpentier, Césaire, Fanon, Vega, Arenas, Valdés, Díaz, and Santos–Febres, and filmmakers such as Gutiérrez Alea and Pérez. Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 3826 Latin American & World Literature (4 credits)

The course will examine contemporary Latin American writers who are exploring the incursion in the world literature through relevant topics such as economic globalization, the influence of international films and concepts of probability and truth clarified by Godel in mathematics. This contemporary Latin American narrative wraps itself in an international space and produces a global narrative with a plurality of discourses and voices. Among the authors to be explored are: Ampuro, Fuguet, Martinez, Paszkowski, Volpi. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 3850: Narrating the City in Latin American Literature and Film (4 credits)

During the second half of the 20th Century many Latin American countries experienced an enormous change in the geographical composition of its inhabitants: if previously the masses had been located in rural areas, in the last 50 to 60 years massive migration displaced them to the cities. Capital cities grew exorbitantly, and an urban imaginary started to dominate fiction and cultural theory. In this course we will study how three Latin American cities – La Habana, Mexico City and Lima– are imagined in late 20th Century Latin American literature, film and cultural criticism. Through these works, we will analyze how people relate with urban space and what type of socialization is generated by the physical structure of each of these three cities. One of the objectives of this course is to have the student develop a critical sensitivity to analyze the spatiality of social life, that is, to understand how the way space is created and lived produces and fosters specific structures of power.

SPAN 4001 Cervante & Don Quixote (4 credits)

Lectures, readings and discussion of Don Quixote. Cervantes' importance for the development of modern fiction.

SPAN 4018 Cuba: Revol, Lit & Film (4 credits)

This interdisciplinary capstone course will study the representation of the Cuban revolutionary process in literature, history, and film. It will explore some of the major topics on the Cuban revolutionary process from the vantage point of historical, literary and cinematic accounts: the relationship of intellectuals to the state, the revision of the past as antecedent to the Cuban revolution and its policies, the place of race, gender and sexuality in revolutionary culture, the Mariel exodus and the revolution’s relationship to Cuban diasporic communities, the critique of revolutionary rhetoric during the post–Soviet "special period" and issues related to consumption, gender, sexuality, race, urban development and subjectivity during the current period of economic and cultural transition from socialism. It will use an interdisciplinary historical, literary and cinematic approach to examine the Cuban revolutionary process and will offer as a complement to the course an optional Spring Study–Tour of Havana, LALS 3930, "Contemporary Cuban Culture in Havana." The course will be conducted in English with texts in Spanish and English translation, and will count toward the major and minor in Spanish.

SPAN 4520 Spain In Context (4 credits)

Focusing on the relationship between creativity and society, the course explores the literature and culture of Spain’s diverse regions. The course comprises the following elements: classes taught by Dr. Lamas, trips, cultural visits, and gatherings/workshops with prestigious Spanish intellectuals and artists (at the so–called tertulias). Students work in groups towards a final project, which will be presented in class as a Podcast, and handled to the instructor as a journal article ready for publication in the magazine Por Granada, a