Courses

Introduction to Humanitarian Action: Theory and Practice

Introduction to Humanitarian Action: Theory and Practice provides students with an overview of the principal actors in the humanitarian field, including their roles, missions and mandates. It aims to bridge the divide between theoretical and practical approaches to humanitarian assistance and works to provide students with an interdisciplinary perspective to the analysis of gender, age, human rights frameworks, and indigenous cultures within conflict and post-conflict situations.

This course is the prerequisite to the Foreign Service Program. It is offered in the Spring and Fall semesters, as well as the Summer Session.

Foreign Service Program

The Foreign Service Program is a semester-long course that further explores the pressing complex issues of natural and man-made emergencies through a series of case studies. The program also introduces students to possible careers working overseas in development and humanitarian assistance. At the end of the semester, students are granted the unique opportunity to engage in a trip to a country or region that exemplifies the complexities of foreign service during Fordham’s winter recess. Accompanied by one or more faculty, students will travel as a group to one of the possible locations: Nicaragua, Israel, India, or South Africa. The trip aims to help students bridge the gap between theory and practice by meeting with local aid organizations and academics in their respective countries.

Prerequisites: HUST 4001

For further details, see our Foreign Service Trip page

International Humanitarian Studies Internship Seminar

The International Humanitarian Affairs Internship Seminar is the capstone of the program and is designed to provide students with the opportunity gain practical experience with an international humanitarian non-governmental or intergovernmental organization in New York City. Students are required to intern 15 hours per week, as well as attend a weekly seminar designed to connect their experience with the larger themes of humanitarian action. Students learn about the structure and inner-workings of a variety of organizations that work in areas of global health, world poverty and hunger alleviation, human rights, international law, global governance, women’s rights, conflict resolution, peace-keeping, and international education, among others. Students also gain professional communication, research, writing and organizing skills that are essential to any future career.

Please visit the Internships page for a more information on partnering organizations and the application process.

Prerequisites: HUST 4001, HUST 4500

International Humanitarian Studies Major Senior Thesis Seminar

All students in the Humanitarian Studies Major are required to complete the Senior Thesis Seminar. It is a single-semester course, taken in either the fall or spring of the student’s senior year, and culminates with the submission of a research paper of 40 – 60 pages. Students write their thesis under the direction of the seminar instructor, their thesis advisor, and a second reader. The completed thesis must be filed with the Director of Humanitarian Studies in order to complete the program.

Prerequisites: HUST 4001, HUST 4500

Electives

Courses from Category 1, History and Culture in Humanitarian Crises, give students a deeper understanding of the strong cultural and religious backgrounds that can both exacerbate humanitarian crises and serve as healing mechanisms. Category 2, Global Institutions in Contemporary Humanitarian Crises, provides a greater understanding of the dynamics of international political, economic, and social structures and the benefits and challenges of international cooperation. Category 3, Narratives of Justice and Exclusion in Humanitarianism, courses contribute to a greater cultural understanding and sensitivity within the global community prior to immersion in the Foreign Service Program abroad.

Please note that because of the diverse range of relevant disciplines and knowledge it is a challenge to maintain an up-to-date exhaustive list of electives. If you are interested in courses that seem relevant but are not listed below then please contact IIHA Executive Director and academic advisor, Brendan Cahill to seek approval. Additionally, for students considering double majoring, a maximum of 2 courses will be allowed to overlap for specific major requirements.

History and Culture in Humanitarian Crises

The History, Philosophy and Anthropology Area Studies requirement is integral to a holistic understanding of international humanitarian affairs. The following courses are designed to give students a deeper understanding of the strong cultural and religious backgrounds that can both exacerbate humanitarian crises and serve as healing mechanisms.

  • AFAM 1600 - Understanding Historical Change: Africa
  • AFAM 3070 - African Politics
  • AFAM 3072 - Civil Wars in Africa
  • HIST 1400 - Understanding Historical Change: Latin American History
  • HIST 1700 - Understanding Historical Change: Middle East History
  • HIST 3670 - The Modern Middle East
  • HIST 3675 - History of Modern Israel
  • HIST 3855 - American Foreign Policy Since 1898
  • HIST 3911 - U.S. and East Asia
  • HIST 3969 - Latin America and the U.S.
  • HIST 3981 - Modern Middle East
  • HIST 3983 - Arab-Israeli Conflict
  • HIST 4010 - Genocide
  • HIST 4331 - U.S. in the Middle East, 1945-Present
  • HIST 4606 - Seminar: History of Food
  • HIST 4990 - Seminar: History of Climate
  • PHIL 3117 - Ethics: Living, Killing, and Consenting
  • PHIL 3118 - Issues of Life and Death
  • PHIL 3135 - Theories of Justice
  • PHIL 3138 - Philosophy of Human Rights
  • PHIL 3184 - Freedom & Responsibility
  • PHIL 3712 - Global Environment and Justice
  • PHIL 3713 - Human Rights and Global Justice
  • PHIL 3973 - War and Peace, Just War Theory
  • PHIL 4205 - Justice and Social Identity
  • PHIL 4415 - Global Justice and Humanitarian Action
  • ANTH 3373 - Environment and Human Survival
  • ANTH 3380 - Hazards, Disasters & the Human Experience
  • ANTH 3490 - Anthropology of Political Violence
  • ANTH 3725 - Culture and Cultural Change
  • THEO 3455 - Theologies of Liberation
  • THEO 3542 - Catholic Social Teaching
  • THEO 3600 - Religion in Public Life
  • THEO 3610 - Christ in World Cultures
  • THEO 3660 - Religion and Politics
  • THEO 3700 - Scriptures of the World
  • THEO 3711 - Sacred Texts of the Mideast
  • THEO 3715 - Classic Islamic Texts
  • THEO 3720 - Hindu Literature and Ethics
  • THEO 3724 - Classic Buddhist Texts
  • THEO 3730 - Sacred Books of the East
  • THEO 3770 - Islamic Mysticism
  • THEO 3780 - Jesus and World Religions
  • THEO 3861 - Works of Mercy, Work for Justice
  • THEO 4020 - Faith That Imagines Justice
  • THEO 5400 - Topics in Islam: Texts & Traditions

**Fordham College Lincoln Center's Core Curriculum requires students to take two Philosophy courses and two Theology courses. Some selected courses may fulfill both the minor and core requirements.

Global Institutions in Contemporary Humanitarian Crises

As a prerequisite to the Foreign Service Program students must complete one of the designated courses from the following academic departments: Economics, Political Science, Sociology, Humanitarian Affairs, and Social Work. All selected courses contribute to the understanding of global governance, political economy and cooperation. Students will gain a greater understanding of the dynamics of international political and social structures and the benefits and challenges of international cooperation. The completion of one of these courses also serves to help students develop a level of cultural sensitivity prior to immersion in the Foreign Service Program abroad.

  • ECON 3210 - Economies of Emerging Nations
  • ECON 3229 - Political Economy of the Middle East
  • ECON 3235 - Economies of Latin America
  • ECON 3240 - World Poverty
  • ECON 3244 - International Economic Policy
  • ECON 3346 - International Economics
  • ECON 5015 - Economic Development Policy
  • ECON 5450 - Crises, Adjustment and Poverty
  • ECON 6510 - International Trade
  • POSC 2410 - Islamic Political Thought
  • POSC 2506 - Global Governance
  • POSC 2510 - United Nations
  • POSC 3109 - Political Economy of Poverty
  • POSC 3300 - Theories of Law and Human Rights
  • POSC 3501 - Third World Politics
  • POSC 3507 - International Human Rights
  • POSC 3508 - Politics of Humanitarianism in Africa
  • POSC 3511 - War and Peace
  • POSC 3516 - Conflict Analysis and Resolution
  • POSC 3610 - Political Economy of Development
  • POSC 3645 - Politics of Immigration
  • POSC 3651 - Comparative Politics of the Middle East
  • POSC 3916 - Understanding the Global Economy
  • POSC 4454 - Seminar: Global Justice
  • POSC 4805 - International Politics of Peace
  • SOCI 2200 - Sociology of Culture
  • SOCI 3030 - HIV/AIDS in Africa
  • SOCI 3043 - Global Inequalities
  • SOCI 3046 - International Sociology
  • SOCI 3110 - Global Conflict: Wars and Religion
  • SOCI 3148 - Population and Econ Development Issues
  • SOCI 3401 - Gender, Crime and Justice
  • SOCI 3404 - Gender and Immigration
  • SOCI 3410 - Migration and Globalization
  • SOCI 3714 - Terrorism and Society
  • SOCI 4394 - UN, Women, and Youth
  • HUAF 2001 - Introduction to Global Health
  • SOWK 6319 - Social Justice: Practice with Organizations and Communities

Narratives of Justice and Exclusion in Humanitarianism

Students must complete one of the designated courses from the following academic departments: Communications, Women's Studies and Literary Studies. All selected courses contribute to a greater cultural understanding and sensitivity within the global community prior to immersion in the Foreign Service Program abroad.

  • COMM 3106 - International Communication
  • COMM 3110 - Peace, Justice and the Media
  • ENGL 3330 - The Global 18th Century
  • ENGL 3333 - Cannibals, Captives, & Other Victims of Fashion
  • ENGL 3352 - 18th Century Orientalism
  • ENGL 3684 - Food and Globalization
  • WMST 3010 - Feminist Theory in Inter-Cultural Perspectives