Southwell Lecture Series

The St. Robert Southwell, SJ Lecture Series at Fordham University is devoted to the history and theology of the Christian Church in the early modern period. It focuses on the scholarship of the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation, in Europe and the Americas, from 1500 to 1750. During the academic year, one prestigious lecture is delivered each semester.

We wish to announce the publication of the first book to come out of the St. Robert Southwell, SJ lecture series: 
Michelangelo and the English Martyrs by Anne Dillon

The St. Robert Southwell, SJ Lecture Series is administered by:

Susan Wabuda, PhD
Associate Professor of History
Department of History
Fordham University
441 East Fordham Road
Bronx, New York 10458-5159
718-817-3945
wabuda@fordham.edu

Past Southwell Lectures 

Wrestling with Luther

Wednesday, 8 April 2015 | 6 p.m.
Tognino Hall | Duane Library
Rose Hill Campus | Fordham University

SPEAKER:

Martin E. Marty, PhD
Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of the History of Modern Christianity
The University of Chicago Divinity School

Martin Luther hungered for assurance and certainty in the experience of grace. He found fresh ways to speak of doubt and victory as he sought for God, who was both revealed and hidden in bread, wine, and Word. The despair that Luther felt as a sinner was in fact his solution, as he found no place to go except to the God of mercy and grace.

Martin E. Marty is the Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of the History of Modern Christianity at the University of Chicago Divinity School. Most of his books are on the history of modern Christianity, but on occasion (as when he wrote the biography Martin Luther) he addresses issues framed in earlier periods. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by Fordham University in 2005.

The St. Robert Southwell, SJ Lecture Series at Fordham University is devoted to the history and theology of the Christian church in the early modern period. It focuses on the scholarship of the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation, in Europe and the Americas, from 1500 to 1750. During the academic year, one prestigious lecture is delivered each semester.

Our lectures are free and open to the public.

Reformation Diplomacy: The Tudor Kings and Their Ambassadors

10 April 2014
Susan Brigden, PhD
Langford Fellow, Lincoln College
Oxford Reader in History, University of Oxford

When Henry VIII broke with Rome and became supreme head of the Church of England, he fractured the unity of Christendom. There were consequences for diplomacy. How could Catholic powers engage with heretic and schismatic princes? Would ambassadors be safe? Would diplomacy in the age of Luther differ from diplomacy in the age of Machiavelli? This lecture considers these questions. Susan Brigden, PhD, is Langford Fellow at Lincoln College, Oxford, and reader in history at the University of Oxford. She has written London and the Reformation (1989); New Worlds, Lost Worlds: The Rule of the Tudors 1485-1603 (2000); and Thomas Wyatt: The Hearts Forest (2012), winner of the Wolfson Prize for History.