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Speaker Bios

Plenary Speakers


Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 3 p.m.
Pre-Conference Plenary: Sustainable Economies, Sustainable Lives
"Toward a New Economy: Time, Creativity, and Community"

Juliet Schor, PhD

Juliet Schor

Professor of Sociology, Boston College

Juliet Schor is Professor of Sociology at Boston College. She is a member of the MacArthur Foundation Connected Learning Research Network for which she is leading a six-year project on the “connected economy,” studying makerspaces, timebanks, food swaps and open education, as well as large platforms such as Airbnb and Task Rabbit. Schor’s PhD is in economics, which she taught at Harvard University from 1984-1995. She is the author of the national best-seller The Overworked American: The Unexpected Decline of Leisure, The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don’t Need, and True Wealth: How and Why Millions of Americans are Creating a Time-Rich, Ecologically Light, Small-Scale, High-Satisfaction Economy. Schor is the recipient of the Leontief Prize, the Herman Daly Prize, Guggenheim and Radcliffe fellowships, and the ASA Public Understanding of Sociology Award. She appears frequently in national and international media.

Respondents

Joshua Farley, PhD
Joshua Farley is an ecological economist and Associate Professor in Community Development and Applied Economics and Public Administration at The University of Vermont. He has previously served as program director at the School for Field Studies, Centre for Rainforest Studies, as Executive Director of the University of Maryland International Institute for Ecological Economics, and as adjunct faculty and licensed examiner at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill. He recently returned from a Fulbright fellowship in Brazil, where he served as visiting professor at the Federal Universities of Santa Catarina (UFSC) and Bahia (UFBA).

David Cloutier, PhD
David Cloutier is Knott Professor of Catholic Theology at Mount St. Mary’s University, Emmitsburg, MD, where he teaches courses in sexual, economic, and environmental ethics, as well as directing a year-long cross-disciplinary seminar for faculty on the Catholic Intellectual Tradition. He is the author of The Vice of Luxury: Economic Excess in a Consumer Age (Georgetown University Press) and Walking God’s Earth: The Environment and Catholic Faith (Liturgical Press), as well as numerous articles on a wide variety of topics in moral theology. He is the editor of catholicmoraltheology.com, and has been a contributor for Commonweal, the Washington Post, and other media outlets. He also serves as the president of the Board of Directors of the Common Market, his hometown consumer food cooperative.


Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 6 - 8 p.m.
Opening Public Lecture and Forum
“How Can Markets Help Close the Gaps Between Rich and Poor?”

Hernando de Soto

Hernando de Soto

President, Institute for Liberty and Democracy, Lima, Peru

Hernando de Soto is President of the ILD, headquartered in Lima, Peru. He has served as an economist for the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, President of the Executive Committee of the Copper Exporting Countries Organization (CIPEC), CEO of Universal Engineering Corporation, a principal of the Swiss Bank Corporation Consultant Group, and governor of Peru’s Central Reserve Bank. In the early 1990s, he led the effort to insert Peru into the global economy; and, with his ILD team, drafted and promoted more than 187 laws that gave the poorest Peruvians access to economic opportunities; and created the national office of Ombudsman to defend the constitutional and human rights of the Peruvian people. Mr. de Soto also co-chaired with former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright the Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor, and currently serves as honorary co-chair on various boards and organizations, including the World Justice Project. In 2005, the President of Peru appointed Mr. de Soto as his personal representative to design and implement Peru’s free trade program so as to give the poor access to the globalized economy; and also to draw up the strategy to convince the U.S. to sign the Free Trade Agreement with Peru, which it did in 2006.

Sal Giambanco

Sal giambanco

Partner, Omidyar Network

Sal leads the human capital and operations functions of Omidyar Network. In this role, he works to develop and scale the talent at Omidyar Network and its portfolio organizations. From 2000 to 2009, Sal served as the vice president of human resources and administration for PayPal and eBay Inc. Prior to joining PayPal, Sal worked for KPMG as the national recruiting manager for the information, communications, high-tech, and entertainment consulting practices, while also leading KPMG’s collegiate and MBA recruiting programs. Previously, Sal directed human resources at Tech One, Inc. and held positions at Ernst & Young and ESS Technology, Inc. Sal began his career working in the public sector in a variety of roles, primarily in education and hospital ministries. Sal is also currently a lecturer for the University of San Francisco School of Management Silicon Valley Immersion Program. Sal is also on the board for the Global Innovation Fund.

Respondents

Daniel K. Finn, PhD
Dan Finn is the William E. and Virginia Clemens Professor of Economics and Liberal Arts and Professor of Theology at St. John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. His areas of teaching and research include ethics and economics, morality and markets, power in Catholic social thought, and ethics and international trade. He is a former president of the Association for Social Economics, the Society of Christian Ethics, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Midwest Association of Theological Schools. Since 2006, Dan has been the Co-director of the True Wealth of Nations research project at the Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies in Los Angeles.

Carolyn Woo, PhD
Dr. Carolyn Y. Woo is President and CEO of Catholic Relief Services, the official international humanitarian agency of the United States Catholic community. Before coming to CRS, Carolyn served from 1997 to 2011 as dean of the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business. Before this, Carolyn served as associate executive vice president for academic affairs at Purdue University. Carolyn was the first female dean to chair the accreditation body for business schools, AACSB, and directed its Peace Through Commerce initiative. She helped launch the Principles for Responsible Management Education for the United Nations Global Compact. Carolyn was one of five presenters in Rome at the release of Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment in June 2015.


Thursday, April 21, 2016
9 - 10:30 a.m.: Opening Plenary: Perspectives on CST and Modern Markets
"Catholic Social Teaching on Markets: A Historical, Theological, and Ethical Analysis”

Charles E. Curran, PhD

Charles Curran

Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values, Southern Methodist University

Charles Curran is an Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values. His teaching and research interests include fundamental moral theology, social ethics, the role of the Church as a moral and political actor in society, and Catholic moral theology. Charles has served as president of three national academic societies: The Catholic Theological Society of America, Society of Christian Ethics, and American Theological Society. He is a member of the editorial boards: Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics, The Ecumenist, Horizons, Journal of Religious Ethics, and Theoforum; He was also the first recipient of the John Courtney Murray Award of the Catholic Theological Society of America for distinguished achievement in theology; winner of the American Publishers Award for Professional Scholarly Excellence in Theology and Religious Studies (PROSE) for his 2008 book, Catholic Moral Theology in the United States: A History; and a Roman Catholic priest of the Diocese of Rochester, New York (ordained 1958).

Respondents

Maureen O'Hara, PhD
Maureen O’Hara is Purcell Professor of Finance at the Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University. Dr. O'Hara is an expert on market microstructure, and she publishes widely in banking and financial intermediaries, law and finance, and experimental economics. She was a member of the CFTC-SEC Emerging Regulatory Issues Task Force (the “flash crash” committee), the Global Advisory Board of the Securities Exchange Board of India (SEBI), and the Advisory Board of the Office of Financial Research, U.S. Treasury, and is currently serving on the SEC’s Equity Market Structure Advisory Committee.

Charles Clark, PhD
Dr. Clark is currently: Senior Fellow, Vincentian Center for Church and Society; and Professor of Economics. Dr. Clark has been President of Association for Evolutionary Economics and the Association for Institutionalist Thought. His current research interests include: basic income policies; poverty and income inequality; the Irish economy; alternative measures of economic and social well-being; Catholic social thought and the economy. Dr. Clark recently was a Delegate for the Holy See Permanent Mission to the United Nations to the U.N.’s High Level Meetings on the Financial Crisis.

Convener: Prof. Thomas Shannon, Worcester Polytechnic Institute


Thursday, April 21, 2016
1 - 2:15 p.m.: Plenary: Business, Finance and the Common Good
“Do Business Schools Incubate Criminals?”

Luigi Zingales, PhD

Luigi Zingales

Robert C. McCormack Distinguished Service Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance, The University of Chicago

Luigi Zingales' research interests span from corporate governance to financial development, from political economy to the economic effects of culture. Zingales received a bachelor's degree in economics summa cum laude from Università Bocconi in Italy in 1987 and a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992. He co-developed the Financial Trust Index, which monitors Americans’ trust toward their financial system. He joined the Chicago Booth faculty in 1992. Additionally, he is a faculty research fellow for the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research fellow for the Center for Economic Policy Research, and a fellow of the European Governance Institute. His research earned him the 2003 Bernácer Prize for the best young European financial economist. He is also an editorialist for Il Sole 24 Ore and serves on the Committee on Capital Markets Regulation. In 2014, he was the President of the American Finance Association. In July 2015, he became the director of the Stigler Center at the University of Chicago.

Respondents

Donna Rapaccioli, PhD
Donna Rapaccioli is Dean of the Gabelli School of Business at Fordham University, where she holds the rank of University Professor. Dr. Rapaccioli's research interests lie in the area of earnings management and international accounting; she has published articles in academic journals and practitioner outlets and is the co-author of two book chapters. She has consulted for and lectured on accounting and finance topics at numerous financial institutions in New York City and serves as a director on the board of GE Asset Management Mutual Funds. Dr. Rapaccioli serves on the Board of Trustees of Emmanuel College in Boston and the Graduate Management Admission Council Board, and she is a member of the Advisory Board for the International Association of Jesuit Business Schools. She also serves on the Board of Directors of Fordham University's London Centre, the Steering Committee for Fordham's Consortium for Social Justice, and the Board of Advisors of the Fordham Corporate Law Center.

Lynn Stout, JD
Professor Lynn Stout is the Distinguished Professor of Corporate and Business Law at Cornell University and an internationally-recognized expert in corporate governance, financial regulation, and ethical behavior. She has published numerous books and articles and lectures widely. Professor Stout currently serves on the Board of Governors of the CFA Institute, the Board of Advisors for the Aspen Institute’s Business and Society Program, and the Advisory Committee to the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Financial Research. She was an Independent Trustee for Eaton Vance Mutual Funds for many years and has also served on the Board of Directors of the American Law and Economics Association and as the Chair of the American Association of Law School’s Section on Law and Economics and Section on Business Associations. She has also taught at the Harvard, NYU, Georgetown, UCLA, and George Washington University law schools and served as a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution.


Thursday, April 21, 2016, 4:30 - 6 p.m.
Plenary: Economic Inequality, Children and Families
"Improving Children's Chances: Evidence on Early-Life Investments and Economic Inequality"

Jere R. Behrman, PhD

Behrman

Professor of Economics and Sociology and Population Studies Center Research Associate, University of Pennsylvania

Jere R. Behrman (PhD Economics, MIT) is the WR Kenan, Jr. Professor of Economics and Sociology and Population Studies Center Research Associate at the University of Pennsylvania. His research is in empirical micro economics, economic development, early childhood development, labor economics, human resources (education, training, health, nutrition), economic demography, household behaviors, life-cycle and intergenerational relations and policy evaluation. He has published about 400 professional articles (primarily in leading general and field economic journals, also in leading demographic, sociology, nutritional and biomedical journals) and 35 books. He has been a research consultant with numerous international organizations, involved in professional research or lecturing in over 40 countries, principal investigator or investigator on over 160 research projects and received various honors for his research, including being selected a Fellow of the Econometric Society, a 40th Anniversary Fulbright Fellow, the 2008 biennial Carlos Diaz-Alejandro Prize for outstanding research contributions to Latin America, a 2011 Doctor Honoris Causa from the University de Chile, and a member of the U.S. National Institutes of Child Health and Development (NICHD) Advisory Council.

Respondents

Henry Schwalbenberg, PhD
Dr. Henry M. Schwalbenberg is an Associate Professor of Economics and the Director of the Graduate Program in International Political Economy and Development (IPED) at Fordham University. His research has focused on international trade policy, emerging equity markets, foreign assistance, Philippine Economic History and Catholic Social Teaching. Dr. Schwalbenberg has won two Fulbright Research Fellowships and several awards for teaching excellence. He serves on a number of boards including the University Neighborhood Housing Program and the US Affiliate of the Vatican Foundation Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice. He is also the Coordinator of the US Peace Corps Coverdell Fellowship Program at Fordham University and has been a regular member of the US Fulbright Selection Committee for Southeast Asia.

Diane Rodriguez, PhD
Dr. Diane Rodriguez is an Associate Professor in the Division of Curriculum and Teaching, Graduate School of Education, Fordham University. Her primary research interest is at the intersection of special education, bilingual and multicultural education, and teacher preparation. Dr. Rodriguez has been an invited speaker at national and international conferences on special education and bilingual education. Dr. Rodriguez continues her work to provide training in special education to international audiences. She serves as an Executive Board Member in the East Coast Migrant Head Start and the Division of Learning Disabilities –Council for Exceptional Children. She served as a member of the Nomination Committee of the Council for Exceptional Children. She was a co-editor of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction. Dr. Rodriguez was appointed by North Carolina Governor Perdue to the Advisory Council on Latino Affairs.


Thursday, April 21, 2016, 7:30 p.m.
Plenary Panel: Laudato si, Ecology, and Sustainable Business
Moderator: David Gelles, The New York Times

Carolyn Woo, PhD

Carolyn Woo

President and CEO, Catholic Relief Services

Dr. Carolyn Y. Woo is President & CEO of Catholic Relief Services, the official international humanitarian agency of the United States Catholic community. Before coming to CRS, Carolyn served from 1997 to 2011 as dean of the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, which was frequently recognized as the nation's leading business school in ethics education and research. Before this, Carolyn served as associate executive vice president for academic affairs at Purdue University. Her teaching, research and administrative leadership have been recognized through Best Paper Awards by the Academy of Management, selection as one of 40 Young Leaders of American Academe by Change Magazine; distinguished alumna and honorary alumna by Purdue University and University of Notre Dame. Carolyn was the first female dean to chair the accreditation body for business schools, AACSB, and directed its Peace Through Commerce initiative. She helped launch the Principles for Responsible Management Education for the United Nations Global Compact. Carolyn was one of five presenters in Rome at the release of Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment in June 2015.

Anthony Annett, PhD

Anthony Annett

Climate Change and Sustainable Development Advisor, Earth Institute, Columbia University; Religions for Peace

He works on the intersection of ethics and economics, and is a specialist in Catholic social teaching. He has acted as an informal consultant to the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, and co-authored the remarks delivered by Dr. Carolyn Woo at the launch of the encyclical, Laudato Si’. He also participated in on online course centered on Laudato Si’, produced by the educational platform of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network at Columbia University. He writes and blogs frequently for Commonweal magazine. Prior to his current appointment, he worked at the International Monetary Fund in Washington DC for sixteen years, including as a speechwriter to two successive Managing Directors, Dominique Strauss-Kahn and Christine Lagarde.

Christiana Peppard, PhD

Christiana Peppard

Assistant Professor of Theology, Fordham University

Christiana Z. Peppard is Assistant Professor of Theology, Science and Ethics in the Department of Theology at Fordham University, where she is affiliated faculty in Environmental Studies and American Studies. Her research engages religious ecological ethics at the intersection of Catholic social teaching, ecological anthropology, natural law theory and developments in the earth sciences. She teaches a range of undergraduate and graduate courses at Fordham, including: Religion and Ecology, Human Nature After Darwin, Ecological Ethics, and Theology and Contemporary Science. She lectures nationally and internationally on these topics and has provided analysis of contemporary topics in ecological ethics and religion and science in venues such as Public Radio International, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, The New Republic, the Washington Post, TED-Ed, MSNBC, and others.

Ralph Izzo, Chairman

Ralph Izzo

President and CEO, Public Service Enterprise Group

Ralph Izzo was elected chairman and chief executive officer of Public Service Enterprise Group Incorporated (PSEG) in April 2007. He was named as the company’s president and chief operating officer and a member of the board of directors of PSEG in October 2006. Previously, Mr. Izzo was president and chief operating officer of Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE&G). Mr. Izzo’s career began as a research scientist at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, performing numerical simulations of fusion energy experiments. He has published or presented over 35 papers on magnetohydrodynamic modeling. Mr. Izzo is a well-known leader within the utility industry, as well as the public policy arena. He is frequently asked to testify before Congress and speak to organizations on matters pertaining to national energy policy. Mr. Izzo is a former Chair of the Rutgers University Board of Governors and the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce.


Friday, April 22, 2016, 9 - 11 a.m.
Plenary for Students: CST: Foundations and Implications for Action Today

Meghan Clark, PhD

Meghan Clark

Assistant Professor of Theology and Religious Studies, St. John's University

Dr. Clark joined the faculty at St. John’s University as an assistant professor of moral theology in 2011. A social ethicist, she focuses on questions of global health, economic development, participation, and justice in Catholic moral theology and public or political theology.  Fall 2015, she was a Fulbright Scholar and Visiting Professor at Hekima Institute for Peace Studies and International Relations at Hekima University College in Nairobi, Kenya. In 2013, Dr. Clark was appointed as a Fellow of the Institute of Policy Research and Catholic Studies at Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. From 2010-2013, she served as a Consultant to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Committee on Domestic Justice. Dr. Clark serves as a faculty expert for the Holy See’s Mission to the United Nations coordinated by St. John’s Vincentian Center for Church and Society. Her book, The Vision of Catholic Social Thought : The Virtue of Solidarity and the Praxis of Human Rights (Fortress, 2014) won the 2015 Catholic Press Association Book Award  in Catholic social teaching.  Additionally, she is on the Board of Directors of America Press, Inc and the faculty advisory board for Catholic Relief Services “CRS University” Global Solidarity Network. She is also a columnist for US Catholic magazine and blogs at Catholic Moral Theology and Millennial Journal.

Rev. Fred Kammer, SJ

Fred Kammer

Executive Director, Jesuit Social Research Institute, Loyola New Orleans

Paper Title: "Canaries in the Coal Mine: The deep connection between environmental destruction and poverty"

Fred Kammer is a priest, an attorney, and a member of the Central and Southern Province of the Jesuits. He is the director of the Jesuit Social Research Institute, Loyola University New Orleans. From 2002 to 2008, he was the Provincial Superior of the New Orleans Province. From 1992 to 2001, he was the President/CEO of Catholic Charities USA. Prior to that he worked primarily in legal services for the poor in Atlanta and in Catholic Charities in Baton Rouge. He has written three books: Doing Faithjustice: An Introduction to Catholic Social Thought, [Paulist Press 1991, 1992, 2005], Salted with Fire: Spirituality for the Faithjustice Journey [Paulist Press 1995, Wipf and Stock Publishers 2008], and Faith. Works. Wonders.—An Insider’s Guide to Catholic Charities [Wipf and Stock, 2009]. He holds a BA from Spring Hill College; JD from Yale University School of Law; and an MDiv from Loyola University of Chicago.


Friday, April 22, 2016, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Luncheon Plenary: Economy, Ecology, and Exclusion in an Election Year

John Carr

John Carr

John Carr is the director of the Initiative on Catholic Social Thought and Public Life at Georgetown University. He is also Washington correspondent of America Magazine. During the 2012-2013 academic year he held a residential fellowship at the Institute of Politics of Harvard University. Prior to that he served for over 20 years as director of the Department of Justice, Peace and Human Development at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, providing guidance for the US bishops' public policy and advocacy initiatives and publicly representing the department. He also headed the Catholic Campaign for Human Development and has contributed to the development of national statements such as Communities of Salt and Light and Faithful Citizenship. In addition, Carr has also served as executive director of the White House Conference on Families and as director of the National Committee for Full Employment.

Maureen O'Connell, PhD

Maureen O'Connell

Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Religion at LaSalle University

Maureen O’Connell is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Religion at LaSalle University. She previously taught at Fordham University from 2005 to 2013. Her areas of expertise include Christian/Catholic social ethics, the arts and social justice, and racism and racial justice; her current research project explores racial identity formation, racism, and racial justice in Catholic institutions of higher education. O’Connell’s publications include If These Walls Could Talk: Community Muralism and the Beauty of Justice (2012), She Who Imagines: Contemporary Feminist Aesthetics (2012, ed. with Laurie Cassidy), Religion, Economics and Culture in Conflict and Conversation (2011, ed. with Laurie Cassidy), and Compassion: Loving Our Neighbor in an Age of Globalization (2009), as well as numerous journal articles. She serves on the board of the Society for the Arts in Religious and Theological Studies and is vice president of the College Theology Society.

Bryan N. Massingale, PhD

Massingale

Professor, Marquette University

The Rev. Bryan N. Massingale is a professor of theology at Marquette University. He specializes in Catholic social thought, African-American religious ethics, liberation theologies, and racial justice, focusing on the impact of religious faith as both an instrument of social injustice and a catalyst for social transformation. He is the author of Racial Justice and the Catholic Church, which received a first-place book award from the Catholic Press Association.


Friday, April 22, 2016, 1:30 - 2:45 p.m.
Plenary: Sustainable Livelihoods for All: Work and Working Families
"Can Values and Economies Thrive Simultaneously?: The Impact of How We Shape Work and Treat Families in Every Corner of Our Country and World"

Jody Heymann, MD, PhD

Jody Heymann

Dean, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Dr. Jody Heymann, an internationally renowned researcher on health and social policy, became Dean of the Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health in January, 2013. Prior to coming to UCLA, Dr. Heymann held a Canadian Chair in Global Health and Social Policy at McGill University and was the Founding Director of the Institute for Health and Social Policy, the Project on Global Working Families and the World Policy Analysis Center (WPAC). Dr. Heymann established and leads the first global initiative to examine health and social policy in all 193 UN nations. She has authored and edited more than 250 publications, including 17 books. Deeply committed to translating research into policies and programs that improve individual and population health, Dr. Heymann has worked with government leaders in North America, Europe, Africa and Latin America as well as intergovernmental organizations including the World Health Organization, the International Labor Organization, the World Economic Forum, UNICEF and UNESCO. She has helped develop legislation with Congress and UN agencies based on the implications of her team’s research results.

Respondents
Prof. Joseph McCartin, Georgetown
Others TBA


Friday, April 22, 2016, 4:30 p.m.
Plenary Panel: Looking Forward: Paths for Constructive Action

Michael Naughton, PhD

Michael Naughton

Director, Center for Catholic Studies; Director, John A. Ryan Institute for Catholic Social Thought; Professor, Catholic Studies and Ethics and Business Law, St. Thomas University

Michael Naughton is the holder of the Alan W. Moss Endowed Chair in Catholic Social Thought at the University of St. Thomas (Minnesota) where he is a full professor with a joint appointment in the departments of Catholic Studies (College of Arts and Sciences) and of Ethics and Business Law (Opus College of Business). He is the director of the Center for Catholic Studies, which is the oldest and largest Catholic Studies program in the world. He is also the director of the John A. Ryan Institute for Catholic Social Thought, at the Center for Catholic Studies. He is the author and editor of nine books and over 40 articles. He helped coordinate and write the Vocation of the Business Leader issued by the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace (2012), which is translated into 15 languages. He currently serves as board chair for Reell Precision Manufacturing (for profit) and board member for Seeing Things Whole (non-profit).

Joshua Farley, PhD

Joshua Farley

Professor of Community Development and Applied Economics, University of Vermont

Joshua Farley is an ecological economist and Associate Professor in Community Development & Applied Economics and Public Administration at The University of Vermont. Josh holds degrees in biology, international affairs and economics. He has previously served as program director at the School for Field Studies, Centre for Rainforest Studies, as Executive Director of the University of Maryland International Institute for Ecological Economics, and as adjunct faculty and licensed examiner at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill. He recently returned from a Fulbright fellowship in Brazil, where he served as visiting professor at the Federal Universities of Santa Catarina (UFSC) and Bahia (UFBA).His broad research interests focus on the design of an economy capable of balancing what is biophysically possible with what is socially, psychologically and ethically desirable. His research focuses on mechanisms for allocating resources under local control and national sovereignty that generate global public goods, developing transdisciplinary case study approaches to environmental problem solving as an educational tool, ecological restoration of rainforest ecosystems, economic globalization, and the valuation and finance of restoring natural capital.

Maureen O'Connell, PhD

Maureen O'Connell

Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Religion at LaSalle University

Maureen O’Connell is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Religion at LaSalle University. She previously taught at Fordham University from 2005 to 2013. Her areas of expertise include Christian/Catholic social ethics, the arts and social justice, and racism and racial justice; her current research project explores racial identity formation, racism, and racial justice in Catholic institutions of higher education. O’Connell’s publications include If These Walls Could Talk: Community Muralism and the Beauty of Justice (2012), She Who Imagines: Contemporary Feminist Aesthetics (2012, ed. with Laurie Cassidy), Religion, Economics and Culture in Conflict and Conversation (2011, ed. with Laurie Cassidy), and Compassion: Loving Our Neighbor in an Age of Globalization (2009), as well as numerous journal articles. She serves on the board of the Society for the Arts in Religious and Theological Studies and is vice president of the College Theology Society.


Plenary Respondents

Charles Clark, PhD

Charles Clark

Professor and Senior Fellow, Vincentian Center, St. John's University

Dr. Clark is currently: Senior Fellow, Vincentian Center for Church and Society; and Professor of Economics. He has lectured widely in the United States and Europe with more than 100 publications. Dr. Clark has been President of Association for Evolutionary Economics and the Association for Institutionalist Thought. Past positions include: Associate Editor of the Review of Business, book review editor of History of Economic Ideas; and the Board of Directors of the Association for Evolutionary Economics. His current research interests include: basic income policies; poverty and income inequality; the Irish economy; alternative measures of economic and social well-being; Catholic social thought and the economy. Dr. Clark has been Visiting Professor of Economics at University College Cork, Ireland and the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (Angelicum), Rome. He has also served as a consultant on fiscal impact analysis; the economic impact of baseball stadiums; on tax and social welfare reforms and labor economics. Dr. Clark recently was a Delegate for the Holy See Permanent Mission to the United Nations to the U.N.’s High Level Meetings on the Financial Crisis.

David Cloutier, PhD

David Cloutier

Knott Professor of Catholic Theology, Mount St. Mary’s University (MD)

Presentation Title: "How Luxury Undermines Good Economies"

David Cloutier is Knott Professor of Catholic Theology at Mount St. Mary’s University, Emmitsburg, MD, where he teaches courses in sexual, economic, and environmental ethics, as well as directing a year-long cross-disciplinary seminar for faculty on the Catholic Intellectual Tradition. He is the author of The Vice of Luxury: Economic Excess in a Consumer Age (Georgetown University Press) and Walking God’s Earth: The Environment and Catholic Faith (Liturgical Press), as well as numerous articles on a wide variety of topics in moral theology. He is the editor of catholicmoraltheology.com, and has been a contributor for Commonweal, the Washington Post, and other media outlets. He also serves as the president of the Board of Directors of the Common Market, his hometown consumer food cooperative.

Daniel K. Finn, PhD

Daniel Finn

Clemens Professor in Economics and the Liberal Arts, St. John's University

Dan Finn is the William E. and Virginia Clemens Professor of Economics and Liberal Arts and Professor of Theology at St. John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. His areas of teaching and research include ethics and economics, morality and markets, power in Catholic social thought, and ethics and international trade. He is a former president of the Association for Social Economics, the Society of Christian Ethics, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Midwest Association of Theological Schools. Since 2006, Dan has been the Co-director of the True Wealth of Nations research project at the Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies in Los Angeles. His books include Christian Economic Ethics: History and Implications and The Moral Ecology of Markets: Assessing Claims about Markets and Justice. He is currently working on a book entitled, The Ethics and Economics of Market Complicity: Who Is Responsible for the Harms Markets Cause to Distant Others?

Maureen O'Hara, PhD

Maureen O'Hara

Robert W. Purcell Professor Finance, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University

Maureen O’Hara is Purcell Professor of Finance at the Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University. She received her doctorate from Northwestern University and Honorary Doctorates from Facultés Universitaires Catholiques à Mons (FUCAM), Universität Bern, and University College Dublin. A past President of the American Finance Association, Dr. O'Hara is an expert on market microstructure, and she publishes widely in banking and financial intermediaries, law and finance, and experimental economics. She is the author of numerous journal articles as well as the books Market Microstructure Theory (Blackwell: 1995), and High Frequency Trading: New Realities for Traders, Markets, and Regulators (Risk Books: 2013). Her most recent book, Something for Nothing: Arbitrage and Ethics on Wall Street, will be published this fall by Norton Books. Professor O’Hara has served on a variety of corporate boards including Investment Technology Group, Inc. (ITG), NewStar Financial, Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association (TIAA-CREF), and she was chairman of the board of Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Rochester. She was a member of the CFTC-SEC Emerging Regulatory Issues Task Force (the “flash crash” committee), the Global Advisory Board of the Securities Exchange Board of India (SEBI), and the Advisory Board of the Office of Financial Research, U.S. Treasury, and is currently serving on the SEC’s Equity Market Structure Advisory Committee.

Donna Rapaccioli

Rapaccioli

Gabelli School of Business Dean and University Professor, Fordham University

Donna Rapaccioli is Dean of the Gabelli School of Business at Fordham University, where she holds the rank of University Professor. As an administrator, Dr. Rapaccioli has earned a reputation for creating academic programs that emphasize applied learning, a global perspective, interdisciplinary thinking, and strong ties with industry. Her philosophy centers on business with purpose, grounded in the Jesuit-influenced principle that commerce should advance society in a greater way. Dr. Rapaccioli's research interests lie in the area of earnings management and international accounting; she has published articles in academic journals and practitioner outlets and is the co-author of two book chapters. She has consulted for and lectured on accounting and finance topics at numerous financial institutions in New York City and serves as a director on the board of GE Asset Management Mutual Funds. Dr. Rapaccioli serves on the Board of Trustees of Emmanuel College in Boston and the Graduate Management Admission Council Board, and she is a member of the Advisory Board for the International Association of Jesuit Business Schools. She also serves on the Board of Directors of Fordham University's London Centre, the Steering Committee for Fordham's Consortium for Social Justice, and the Board of Advisors of the Fordham Corporate Law Center.

Diane Rodriguez, PhD

Diane Rodriguez

Associate Professor of Curriculum and Teaching, Fordham University Graduate School of Education

Dr. Diane Rodriguez is an Associate Professor in the Division of Curriculum and Teaching, Graduate School of Education, Fordham University. Her primary research interest is at the intersection of special education, bilingual and multicultural education, and teacher preparation. She has received numerous grants from the U.S. Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services and the Office of English Language Acquisition. Dr. Rodriguez has been an invited speaker at national and international conferences on special education and bilingual education. Dr. Rodriguez continues her work to provide training in special education to international audiences. She serves as an Executive Board Member in the East Coast Migrant Head Start and the Division of Learning Disabilities –Council for Exceptional Children. She served as a member of the Nomination Committee of the Council for Exceptional Children. She was a co-editor of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction. Dr. Rodriguez was appointed by North Carolina Governor Perdue to the Advisory Council on Latino Affairs. Univision selected Dr. Rodriguez as an example of "Orgullo de Nuestra Comunidad," which highlights individuals who give back to the community. She was recognized for her work with individuals with disabilities. Univision created an on-air vignette, which has run on National television.

Henry Schwalbenberg

Schwalbenberg

Associate Professor of Economics and Director of IPED Graduate Program, Fordham University

Dr. Henry M. Schwalbenberg is an Associate Professor of Economics and the Director of the Graduate Program in International Political Economy and Development (IPED).

His teaching responsibilities include International Economic Policy, Economic Development Policy, Foreign Aid and Development, Emerging Markets, and Project Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation. His research has focused on international trade policy, emerging equity markets, foreign assistance, Philippine Economic History and Catholic Social Teaching. Dr. Schwalbenberg has won two Fulbright Research Fellowships and several awards for teaching excellence. He serves on a number of boards including the University Neighborhood Housing Program and the US Affiliate of the Vatican Foundation Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice. He is also the Coordinator of the US Peace Corps Coverdell Fellowship Program at Fordham University and has been a regular member of the US Fulbright Selection Committee for Southeast Asia.

Lynn Stout, JD

Lynn Stout 2

Distinguished Professor of Corporate and Business Law, Cornell University

Professor Lynn Stout is the Distinguished Professor of Corporate and Business Law at Cornell University and an internationally-recognized expert in corporate governance, financial regulation, and ethical behavior. She has published numerous books and articles and lectures widely. Her book The Shareholder Value Myth: How Putting Shareholders First Harms Investors, Corporations and the Public was named 2012 Governance Book of the Year; the Ethisphere Institute recently listed her among the “100 Most Influential in Business Ethics.” Professor Stout currently serves on the Board of Governors of the CFA Institute, the Board of Advisors for the Aspen Institute’s Business & Society Program, and the Advisory Committee to the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Financial Research. She was an Independent Trustee for Eaton Vance Mutual Funds for many years and has also served on the Board of Directors of the American Law and Economics Association and as the Chair of the American Association of Law School’s Section on Law and Economics and Section on Business Associations. She received her law degree from Yale and her undergraduate and master’s degrees in public policy from Princeton University. She has also taught at the Harvard, NYU, Georgetown, UCLA, and George Washington University law schools and served as a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution.


Concurrent Session Speakers

Kevin Ahern, PhD

Kevin Ahern

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Manhattan College

Kevin Glauber Ahern, is an assistant professor of religious studies at Manhattan College. He defended his doctoral dissertation in theological ethics from Boston College in 2013. His dissertation was entitled “Structures of Grace: Catholic NGOs and the Church’s Mission in a Globalized World.” From 2003 to 2007, Kevin Ahern served as the President of the International Movement of Catholic Students (IMCS-Pax Romana), an international network of students in over eighty countries. He continues to be active on the boards of several national and international networks, including the Catholic Common Ground Initiative, the board of directors of America Press and as a Vice-President of the ICMICA-Pax Romana, He has edited the Radical Bible and Visions of Hope: Emerging Theologians and the Future of the Church, both with Orbis Books. His research interests include: Christian social movements, pneumatology and ecclesiology, economic justice and work, reception of the Second Vatican Council, magnanimity and the theological virtue of hope, missiology and justice, lay ministry and lay participation, global governance reform, and consistent ethic of life.

Barbara Hilkert Andolsen, PhD

James E. Buckman, Esq., Chair in Applied Christian Ethics, Fordham University

Gerald Beyer, PhD

Gerald Beyer

Associate Professor of Theology and Religious Studies, Villanova University

Dr. Beyer joined the faculty of Villanova University in 2013. He is an expert in the ethical principles that are the underpinnings of Catholic Social Teaching. He discusses social justice issues of contemporary importance in the Church and is a leading authority on Pope John Paul II and the Polish Solidarity Movement. Prior to his work at Villanova, Dr. Beyer was a Tenured Associate Professor of Christian Social Ethics at Saint Joseph’s University. Some of his publications include Recovering Solidarity: Lessons from Poland's Unfinished Revolution (2010), “Labor Unions, Adjuncts, and the Mission and Identity of Catholic Universities,” Horizons: The Journal of the College Theology Society, Vol. 42, No. 1 (2015), and “Reflections on the Canonizations of Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II,” Political Theology Today, April 25, 2014.

Christine Firer Hinze, PhD

Cfhinze

Professor of Theology; Director of the Curran Center for American Catholic Studies, Fordham University

Christine Firer Hinze is Professor of Theology and Director of the Francis and Ann Curran Center for American Catholic Studies at Fordham University. Her teaching and research focus on foundational and applied issues in Christian social ethics with special emphasis on the dynamics of social transformation, Catholic social thought, and economic and work justice for vulnerable women, families and groups. She is the author of Comprehending Power in Christian Social Ethics (Oxford, 1995), Glass Ceilings, Dirt Floors: Women, Work, and the Global Economy (Madeleva Lecture Series, Paulist Press, 2015), co-editor (with J. Patrick Hornbeck) of More Than A Monologue: Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church, vol 1: Voices of Our Times (Fordham University Press, 2014), and has published scores of scholarly essays in books and in journals such as Theological Studies, The Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics, The Journal of Catholic Social Thought, and Studies in Christian Ethics. She was born in Chicago and raised in the city of Detroit, where she did inner-city ministry and taught high school prior to her doctoral studies. She taught at St. Norbert College and Marquette University prior to her 2006 appointment at Fordham.

Stephanie Luce

Stephanie Luce

Professor of Labor Studies and Sociology, CUNY School of Professional Studies

Stephanie Luce is Professor of Labor Studies at the Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education, School for Professional Studies, and Professor of Sociology at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Best known for her research on living wage campaigns and movements, she is the author of Fighting for a Living Wage, and co-author of The Living Wage: Building a Fair Economy, and A Measure of Fairness. Her current research focuses on globalization and labor standards, labor-community coalitions, and regional labor markets. Her most recent book, Labor Movements: Global Perspectives, was published in 2014 by Polity Press.

Sophie Mitra, PhD

Sophie Mitra

Associate Professor of Economics, Fordham University

Sophie Mitra, PhD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at Fordham University with research interests in disability and health, development and applied microeconomics. Dr. Mitra is also senior research associate with the Social Justice and Policy Research Unit of CIPS (Center for International Policy Studies) at Fordham. Dr. Mitra earned an MA in development economics and a doctorate in Economics from the University of Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne in France. Before doing her doctorate, Dr. Mitra worked for the Overseas Development Institute (ODI, London) as an overseas fellow in Fiji. Recently, Dr. Mitra has studied the association between disability and poverty, the economic impact of disability onset, multidimensional poverty in the U.S., social protection programs and the economic impact of mental health problems. Dr. Mitra has been published in many peer-reviewed journals including the American Economic Review, Health Economics, Social Science and Medicine and World Development. Dr. Mitra is a fellow of the Human Development and Capability Association.

Joseph A. McCartin, PhD

Joseph_McCartin

Professor of History; Director, Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor, Georgetown University

Joseph A. McCartin an expert on U.S. labor, social and political history. His research and writing focuses on the intersection of labor organization, politics, and public policy. He teaches courses in 20th Century U.S. Labor History, U.S. Since 1945, America Between the Wars, Modern U.S. State and Society, and 20th Century U.S. Society. McCartin’s most recent book, Collision Course (Oxford University Press, 2011) traces the decline of organized labor in the U.S. since the 1960s, using the 1981 PATCO strike of air traffic controllers as its narrative focus. His current research interests concern the recent past and present state of collective bargaining in the private and public sectors. McCartin's 1997 book, Labor’s Great War: The Struggle for Industrial Democracy and the Origins of Modern American Labor Relations, 1912-21, won the 1999 Philip Taft Labor History Book Award for the best book on labor history. McCartin's article, " 'Fire the Hell Out of Them': Sanitation Workers' Struggles and the Normalization of the Striker Replacement Strategy in the 1970s", won the Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas prize as the best article on labor history published in 2005. McCartin was named a fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1993 and again in 2002. In 2003, he was named a Charles Warren Fellow at Harvard University.