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Jewish Studies Current Courses

Fall 2019

HEBR 1001 Beginners Hebrew I M. Th. 10 - 11.15 a.m., and W. 9 - 10:45 a.m. (LC)

HEBR 1502 Intermediate Hebrew II M. Th. 4 - 5.15 p.m. (LC)

HIST 1850 UHC: Jews in the Ancient and Medieval World M. Th. 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm (Magda Teter, RH) Attributes: Freshreg FC History Soph FRHI, GLBL, UHC, INST, JWST, MVST
The course will explore the history and culture of Jews from biblical times to the eve of modernity, the transformations from "biblical Israelites" to "Jews." It will explore the changes in religious and social culture as biblical Israelites became diaspora Jews. The course will present Jewish history in the broader context of the environment in which Jews lived. The readings will consist mostly of historical sources on Jewish culture, politics, economic activities, social and legal status, and the Jews' relations with non-Jews, Christians, and Muslims.

HIST 3810 Jews in America M.-Th. 4 - 5:15 p.m. (Ayelet Brinn, LC) Attributes: AMST; Advanced History Core AHC; JWST; PLUR.
Jews have been present in North America since the 17th century, but it was in the course of the 19th and early 20th centuries that the Jewish community in the United States rose to significance both within the Jewish world and as a visible presence in American life. Never more than 4% of the population, this small minority has had a prominent role in defining American pluralism. This course traces the history of the Jews in the United States from the colonial period to the 21st century. Among the topics it will cover are the waves of immigration that formed the community: American Jewish religious movements; secular approached to Jewish identity; class conflict and mobility; Jewish participation in politics; American Jewish relations with communities abroad; and America and the Holocaust. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 3862 History of New York City (Daniel Soyer, LC, M/Th 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.); Attributes: Advanced History Core AHC; AMST; HIST: American History req HIAH; LALS; Urban Studies URST

The political, social and cultural development of the city from trading post to metropolis. The emphasis is on leading personalities and the relationship between New York's growth and major American trends over the last century. (Alternate years) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 4010 Genocide M, W 11.30-12.45 (Edward Bristow, LC)

HIST 4308 Antisemitism W 11:30 am - 2:15 pm (Magda Teter, RH), and T 6 -8.45PM (Doron Ben-Atar, LC)

PHIL 3665: Philosophy and Judaism in the 20th Century (Crina Gschwandtner MR 10 - 11:15 a.m.)
This course is devoted to the thought of Jewish philosophers in the 20th century on such topics as the ethical encounter between self and other; chosenness and election; Jewish-Christian relations; redemption and messianism; forgiveness and hospitality; as well as responses to the Shoah, to Zionism, and to the Palestinian question We will take up these themes as discussed by thinkers such as Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, Simone Weil, Walter Benjamin, Jean Wahl, Emmanuel Lévinas, Hannah, Arendt, Vladimir Jankélévitch, Jean- François Lyotard, Jacques Derrida, and/or Judith Butler.

THEO 3882 Comparative Mysticism (Kathryn Kueny, LC)
"This course engages and compares mysticisms across time and space, and the philosophies and practices that inform them. Materials will be drawn from ancient Greek and Roman philosophies, South Asian religions, Christian, Jewish, and Muslim traditions, Renaissance hermeticism, Daoyin techniques, and shamanism. Students will examine how various forms of mysticism from around the world have made their way into modern, western practices, such as yoga, meditation, nature spirituality, fitness culture, cryotherapy, AI, and transpersonal philosophies. Through careful comparison of the words, artifacts, gestures, rituals, and sound expressions of mystics in each context, students will consider how self-transcendence and ineffable encounters with the divine or an ultimate reality are mediated through the situated body in similar yet different ways, and reflect on what those similarities and difference might suggest."

LAW course: Islamic, Catholic, and Jewish Laws of War, Economic Regulation and the Environment (Tsvi Blanchard, graduate students only)

Spring 2020

HEBR 1501 Intermediate Hebrew I (Hagit Goral)

HEBR 2001 Hebrew Language and Literature I (Hagit Goral)

HIST 1850 UHC: Jews in Ancient and Medieval World (Magda Teter, LC), Attributes: Freshreg FC History Soph FRHI, GLBL, UHC, INST, JWST, MVST

HIST 3834: Gender, Race, and Mass Media (Ayelet Brinn)

HIST 3925 The Holocaust (Edward Bristow)

ICC Jerusalem: Jewish, Christian, Muslim Perspectives (Sarit Kattan Gribetz, RH)

The History of Jerusalem: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Perspectives (Sarit Kattan Gribetz, Graduate)

HIST 3806 US Immigration (Soyer)

LAW course: Jewish Law: Sources, Principles, Jurisprudence (Daniel Sinclair, graduate students only)