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Jewish Studies Past Events

Fall 2019

October 3
Fordham-NYPL Lecture Series

Paula Ansaldo, University of Buenos Aires
"A history of the Jewish Theater in Buenos Aires: from the star system to the Idisher Folks Teater (1930-1960)"

Fordham University-Lincoln Center, McMahon 109
155 West 60th Street, Room

October 10
Screening of a documentary by Lacey Schwartz
“Little White Lie”
Q&A with Lacey Schwartz
Little White Lie is a personal documentary about the legacy of family secrets, denial, and the power of telling the truth.
A reception will follow.

Fordham University, Lincoln Center, 12th Floor Lounge;
113 West 60th Street

October 23
“Not a Good Time for Hebrew?”
A lunch conversation (in English) with an Israeli author Maya Arad about her story “The Hebrew Teacher.”
Space is limited, kosher lunch will be served, please

Martino Hall 901, 45 Columbus Avenue, New York, NY 10023

October 23
מבט מרחוק: כתיבה בעיברית בארה׳ב
“Glance from a Distance: Writing in Hebrew in the US”
A dinner conversation with Maya Arad on writing Israeli fiction in the United States.
Martino Hall 901, 45 Columbus Avenue, New York, NY 10023
Maya Arad's book in Hebrew "Ha-morah le-'ivrit" will be available for the participants, please RSVP (space limited)

October 24
“Jews and Christians in the Medieval City – Art, Archaeology, and Traces of the Past” 

Join us for an evening with Barbara Boehm (The Met Cloisters), Debra Kaplan (Bar-Ilan University), and Ephraim (Effie) Shoham-Steiner (Ben Gurion University) exploring the recovery of a Jewish past in Christian cities in medieval Europe. This event is connected to the exhibit “The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy” (July 22-January 12, 2019) at the Met Cloisters

Fordham University-Lincoln Center
McNally Amphitheater
140 West 62nd Street

Sunday, October 27
The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy
Afternoon of Talks at the Cloisters
Free with Museum admission

Join Met experts for an afternoon of talks and discussion exploring the Jewish community, art, and viticulture of medieval Alsace, France. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition "The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy."  Speakers: Judith Kogel (Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes, Paris, France), Nina Rowe (Fordham University), Barbara Drake Boehm, Paul and Jill Ruddock Senior Curator for The Met Cloisters; Debra Kaplan (Bar-Ilan University, Israel). Note: Space is limited. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

October 29
A concert of medieval Jewish music with Judith Cohen. Details to follow. Rose Hill Campus

October 31
How the Talmudic Rabbis Transformed Everything into a Legal Question and Jewish Law into a Way of Talking about Everything

Chaim N. Saiman, Professor of Law, Villanova University, Pennsylvania
with responses by  Sarit Kattan Gribetz (Fordham University) and Saul Berman (Yeshiva University and Columbia University Law School)

Fordham Law School, 150 West 62nd Street

In Chaim N. Saiman’s book Halakhah: The Rabbinic Idea of Law, halakhah, or Jewish law, as a legal system is not only a guide to life but also an ongoing encounter with the divine; is not just a body of regulations, but a way of thinking, being, and knowing. Professor Saiman will show how, when pored over and studied, even laws that can seem to provide no practical purpose can provide surprising insights into timeless questions about the very nature of human existence:
What does it mean for legal analysis to connect humans to God? Can spiritual teachings remain meaningful even when rigorously codified? Can a modern state be governed by such law?

November 6
Salo Baron New Voices in Jewish Studies
Alon Tam
Columbia University, Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies

November 14
Michal Pagis (Bar-Ilan University)
“Popular Psychology and Life-Coaching Among Ultra-Orthodox Women in Israel”
Respondent: Ayala Fader (Fordham University)

Fordham University-Lincoln Center
McMahon 109
155 West 60th Street

November 14
Book Club:  
James Whitman, the Ford Foundation Professor of Comparative and Foreign Law at Yale Law School
Hitler's American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law

November 25
Fordham-NYPL Lecture Series

David Assaf, Tel Aviv University
‘To My Beloved Teacher in Eretz Israel’: Childhood, Diaspora, and Zionism in Letters Written by Hebrew School Pupils in Interwar Poland

David Assaf will discuss a treasure trove of some ninety letters written in 1935 by Polish Jewish children (age 12-13) who studied in the Tarbut school north of Warsaw to their teacher who immigrated to Palestine. These moving letters of elementary school pupils (not young adults like those who participated in YIVO competitions for autobiographies) offer a very rare glimpse into the childhood of Jewish children in interwar Poland.

Fordham University - Lincoln Center
McMahon 109
155 West 60th Street

Wednesday, December 4
A Lunch Seminar with
Maria Chiara Rioli, Marie Curie Fellow
"Entangled Interfaith Identities and Relations from the Mediterranean to the United States:
The St James Association and Its Transnational Christian-Jewish Network in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict"
Fordham University, Rose Hill Duane 140 (with lunch)

Sunday, December 8
62nd Leo Baeck Lecture
David Sorkin (Yale University)
“Emancipation, Then and Now,” a lecture based on his research for the forthcoming book, Jewish Emancipation: A History Across Five Centuries.
Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

Spring 2019

Tuesday, March 12
Jewish Studies Book Club
Jessica Marglin, “Across Legal Lines: Jews and Muslims in Modern Morocco”
Fordham Lincoln Center Campus, Lowenstein 12th Floor Lounge
Copies of the book can be purchased at the Fordham Bookstore at Lincoln Center (113 West 60th Street), or online at yalebooks.com with a 25% discount (code for online purchases YZ979). (Fordham and CUNY-GC students and faculty can reserve free copies)

Monday, March 25
Fordham-NYPL Lecture Series
Miranda Crowdus, “The Liturgical Music of the Romaniote Jews: From Antiquity to the Present Day”
Fordham University, Lincoln Center Campus, McMahon Hall 109

Thursday, March 28
Nina Valbousquet, “‘Un-American” and ‘Un-Christian’? Global Antisemitism and Jewish-Catholic Relations in the United States 1936-1945”
Fordham University, Lincoln Center Campus Law School Moot Court | 1-01 150 W 62nd St, New York, NY 10023

Wednesday, April 10
Adam Cohen, “Social and Sacred in the Medieval Haggadah”
Cosponsored by the Center for Medieval Studies and the Department of Art History
Fordham University, Lincoln Center McNally Amphitheater | 140 West 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023

Thursday, April 11
Fordham-NYPL Lecture Series
Yael Levi, “Sarasohn vs. The Workingmen’s Publishing Association”: Socialism, Capitalism, and American-Jewish entrepreneurs in the Yiddish Press in 1890’s New York”
South Lounge, Fordham University, Lincoln Center | 113 W 60th Street | New York, NY 10023

Sunday, April 14
The Haggadah in the Middle Ages and Beyond: A Celebration for Passover
Colloquium and Roundtable
McNally Amphitheater, Fordham University-Lincoln Center | 140 West 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023

Monday, April 29
Fordham-Center for Jewish History Lecture in Jewish-Christian Relations
Joel Sebban, “Secularism and Interfaith Dialogue: Reflections on the Concept of ‘Judeo-Christian Tradition’”
McMahon Hall 109, Fordham University, Lincoln Center, 155 West 60th Street | New York, NY 10023

Wednesday, May 1
Yom Ha-Shoah
Screening of "Witness Theater"
Fordham University, Lincoln Center Campus Law School Moot Court 1-01 150 W 62nd St, New York, NY 10023

Thursday, May 2, 6 p.m.
Rachel Gordan, How Judaism Became an American Religion: Middlebrow Culture and the Making of America's Third Religion
McMahon Hall 109, Fordham University, Lincoln Center, 155 West 60th Street | New York, NY 10023

Sunday, May 5
In Dialogue Part IV: Polish-Jewish Relations in the Post-War Era
All-day symposium
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research 15 West 16th Street

Thursday, May 9
Addendum to the "In Dialogue" Series on Polish-Jewish Relations
A screening of "Bogdan's Journey"
Fordham University-Lincoln Center, Law School Building, 150 West 62nd Street, Moot Court 1-01

Spring 2019

Wednesday, February 13, 12 p.m.
Emerging Voices in Jewish Studies
Daniel Herskowitz, “Heidegger and the Jews - What's Next?”

Thursday, February 21, 6 p.m.
In Dialogue Part III
Samuel Kassow and Piotr Wróbel, “Jewish Polish Relations During the Second World War”

Thursday, February 28, 1 p.m.
Lunch Time Seminar
Yael Wilfand, “How Great Is Peace”: Rabbinic Thinking on Shalom and the Pax Romana

Thursday, March 7, 6 p.m.
Emerging Voices in Jewish Studies
Noam Shoked, “Designing West Bank Settlements: The First Years”

Tuesday, March 12, 6 p.m.
Jewish Studies Book Club
Jessica Marglin, “Across Legal Lines: Jews and Muslims in Modern Morocco”
Fordham Lincoln Center Campus, Lowenstein 12th Floor Lounge
Copies of the book can be purchased at the Fordham Bookstore at Lincoln Center (113 West 60th Street), or online at yalebooks.com with a 25% discount (code for online purchases YZ979). (Fordham and CUNY-GC students and faculty can reserve free copies)

Fall 2018

Thursday, October 4, 6 p.m.
“In Dialogue” on Polish-Jewish Relations, part I
Magda Teter, Fordham University and Brian Porter-Szűcs, University of Michigan

Sunday-Monday, October 7-8
Ben-Gurion University-Fordham Joint Conference: “Appropriation in, and of, the Premodern World”

Thursday, October 18, 6 p.m.
Jackie Jung, Yale University
"The Work of Gothic Sculpture in the Age of Photographic Reproduction."
A joint program of Art History, Medieval Studies, and Jewish Studies

Tuesday, October 23, 6 p.m.
Joel Sebban, Center for Jewish History and Fordham University Fellow in Jewish-Christian Relations
"Secularism and Interfaith Dialogue: Reflections on the Concept of "Judeo-Christian Tradition"

Thursday, November 29 | 6 p.m.
Emerging Voices in Jewish Studies: Liat Alon, A Modern Middle Eastern Jewish Family: Challenging Stereotypes
Columbia University
Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies

December 4 | 6 p.m.
CUNY-Fordham Book Club in Jewish Studies:
A Conversation with Lisa Leff, the author of The Archive Thief.

Spring 2018

January 25, 2018, 6 p.m.
A Different Take on Israel/Palestine: Shared Histories, Divergent Pathways, Part II (1948-1979)
McNally Amphitheater, 140 West 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023

In dialogue with Hussein Ibish and David N. Myers.

February 15, 2018, 6:30 p.m.
Legal Theory and Revelation: Jewish Law in an Islamic Milieu
Marc Herman, Fordham University-Columbia University, the Rabin-Shvidler Post Doctoral Fellow in Jewish Studies
Fordham Law School, 150 West 62nd Street, Bateman Room 2-01B), New York, NY 10023

A Joint Event of Jewish Studies and the Institute on Religion, Law, Lawyer's Work at Fordham University, and the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies at Columbia University.

February 27, 2018, 6 p.m.
A Late Arrival: Isaac Bashevis Singer in New York City, 1935
Fordham-NYPL Lecture Series
David Stromberg, Hebrew University in Jerusalem
Fordham University at Lincoln Center, 155 West 60th Street, Room 109 McMahon Hall, New York, NY 10023

March, 6, 2017 - CANCELLED
Catholic Church in Dialogue with Jews and Non-Catholic Christians: A View from Poland—A Lecture by Bishop Krzysztof Nitkiewicz of Sandomierz, Poland.

March 20, 2018, 6 p.m.
A Different Take on Israel/Palestine: Shared Histories, Divergent Pathways, Part III (1979-Present)
McNally Amphitheater, 140 West 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023

In dialogue with Hussein Ibish and David N. Myers.

March 21, 2018
Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Park Place.

A joint Fordham-MJHNY event about Poland 1968. Film screening of “March Caresses” by Radosław Piwowarski and a discussion with a Polish journalist and 1968 activist Konstanty Gebert of March 1968 events in Poland.

April 19, 2018

Shahar Pinsker, University of Michigan, will give a lecture on café culture and modern Hebrew literature.

April 26, 2018
Scholarship, Belonging, and the Politics of A.S. Yahuda’s Forgotten Scholarship
Columbia-Fordham Emerging Voices in Jewish Studies
Allyson Gonzalez, Yale University

May 3, 2018, 6 p.m.
Eastern European Jewish Immigrants Encounter with Black Americans (1881-1930s)
Fordham-NYPL Lecture Series
Gil Ribak, University of Arizona

Fall 2017

Fall 2017

September 14, 2017, 6 p.m. "In Dialogue" with Hussein Ibish and David N. Myers: A Different Take on Israel/Palestine: Shared Histories, Divergent Pathways, Part I (1882-1948), McNally Amphitheater, Gabelli School of Business at Fordham University, 140 West 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023

During 2017-2018, a year abundant with anniversaries related to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Fordham University will host a three-part lecture series with Hussein Ibish and David N. Myers offering "A Different Take on Israel/Palestine: Shared Histories, Divergent Pathways"

Sunday, September 17, 2017 | 1:30 - 3 p.m. Chuck Fishman: Roots, Resilience and Renewal—Polish Jews, 1975-2016
Opening Reception and Photographer's Talk
5901 Palisade Avenue | (Riverdale) Bronx, New York

October 26, 6:30 p.m.: Emerging Voices in Jewish Studies
Joint event of Jewish Studies and The Institute on Religion, Law and Lawyer's Work at Fordham University, and the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies at Columbia University:
Ofer Dynes, McGill University "Arresting Tales: Law and Morality in Modern Jewish Literature"
Fordham University, Lowenstein, 12th Floor Lounge, 113 West 60th Street, New York, NY 10023

November 9th, 2017, 6PM Fordham-NYPL Lecture Series:
Boaz Huss, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, “The Invention of Jewish Mysticism”
Fordham Law School, 150 West 62nd Street, Room 1-03

2017-2018 is the inaugural year of a partnership between Fordham University and the New York Public Library. Six inaugural Fordham-NYPL fellows in Jewish Studies will give talks and presentations of their new work.

This first lecture in this series will offer a genealogical study of the term "Jewish mysticism" and of the ideological and theological presuppositions that govern the study of Kabbalah and Hasidism. It will critically examine the perception that Kabbalah and Hasidism are Jewish manifestations of a universal mystical phenomenon. It will discuss the historical contexts and processes that led to the invention of Jewish mysticism and to the ways this category shaped the academic study and public perception of Kabbalah, while influencing contemporary forms of Kabbalah and Hasidism.

November 30, 2017, 6 p.m. Jeffrey Shandler, Rutgers University
“Seeing As Believing: Watching Videotaped Interviews with Holocaust Survivors”

Spring 2017

Lincoln Center

Tuesday, February 14, 6 p.m. | 150 West 62nd Street, Room 2-01A
"Religious Nationalism in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict."
Ross Brann, the Milton R. Konvitz Professor of Judeo-Islamic Studies and Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow at Cornell University

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict was born out of competing nationalisms in the same land and to a large extent it remains a struggle over land and rights. However, the events of 1967 and 1979 in Middle East catalyzed the latent forces of religious nationalism further complicating the unresolved conflict between two peoples in the land from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea

A joint event by the History Department, Jewish Studies, and Middle Eastern Studies programs.

Lecture open to public.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017, 6 p.m. | Lowenstein, 12th Floor Lounge
“Multiple Legal Views: A Comparison of the Methods of Early Modern Legal Humanists and Rabbi Joseph Caro, author of the Standard Code of Jewish Law (Shulhan Arukh)”
Fordham University, Lincoln Center, 12th Floor Lounge, Lowenstein
Edward Fram, Ben-Gurion University

Already in Roman times, there was a need for guidance in how to decide between multiple legal views. A solution was offered by the lex citationum, the so called “laws of citations” which was included in the Theodosian Code (438). The laws gave rules as to which views should be followed in which situations. In the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, with learned law assuming an ever greater role in the life of towns, European jurists too faced a plethora of legal views. This talk will focus on how legal humanists proposed to deal with these legal conundrums and compare their approaches to that used by their contemporary, Rabbi Joseph Caro, who was busy creating what would become the standard code of Jewish law, Shulhan Arukh.

Response by Ethan J. Leib, Professor of Law, Fordham School of Law, and W. David Myers, Professor of History, Fordham University.

Moderated by Tsvi Blanchard, the Meyer Struckmann Professor of Jewish Law at Humboldt Faculty of Law in Berlin.

A joint event by the Institute on Religion, Law, and Lawyer’s Work and the Jewish Studies program.

Thursday, March 23, 2017, 6 p.m. | 113 West 60th Street, Lowenstein LL 523
"Competing Ideologies of Hebrew Use at American Jewish Summer Camps"
Sarah Bunin Benor

What is the role of Hebrew in contemporary American Jewish life? This talk focuses on one type of Jewish educational institution: summer camps, which incorporate Hebrew to varying degrees, ranging from a few Hebrew words and songs to Hebrew immersion programs. At many of these camps, staff members hold conflicting ideologies about how much Hebrew to use and whether it is acceptable to use only borrowed nouns rather than full Hebrew sentences. Grammar sticklers at several camps criticize the use of clippings, like meltz (wait tables) from Hebrew meltzar (waiter) and blends, like t’floptions (tefillah [prayer] options). This talk analyzes these competing stances in light of research on language ideology and language socialization and discusses how the discourses are influenced by the historical revernacularization of Hebrew and the influx of Israeli staff members.

Sarah Bunin Benor is Associate Professor of Contemporary Jewish Studies at Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion (Los Angeles) and Adjunct Associate Professor in the University of Southern California Linguistics Department. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in Linguistics in 2004. She is the author of Becoming Frum: How Newcomers Learn the Language and Culture of Orthodox Judaism (Rutgers University Press, 2012), as well as many articles about Jewish language, Yiddish, and American Jews. Professor Benor is founding co-editor of the Journal of Jewish Languages and creator of the Jewish Language Research Website and the Jewish English Lexicon.

A joint event of the Anthropology Department and Jewish Studies at Fordham University.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 6 p.m. | School of Law, 150 West 62nd Street, Room 3-03
“Stepchildren of the Shtetl: Destitute and Disabled Outcasts of East European Jewish Society, 1800-1939”
Natan Meir

How do we grasp the inner workings and mentalities of a society beyond the usual approach of analyzing its central institutions and groups? In this talk, Natan Meir takes the road less traveled by way of looking at society’s outcasts, its underclass, and presents an analysis of Jewish society in eastern Europe in the 19th and early 20th centuries based on the experiences of and attitudes towards beggars, vagrants, disabled people, and the mentally ill. In his talk, Meir offers a new lens through which to view Russian and Polish Jewry: the experience of the marginalized.

Natan Meir is the Lorry I. Lokey Chair in Judaic Studies at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. He is the author of Kiev, Jewish Metropolis: A History, 1859-1914 (Indiana University Press, 2010), and a co-editor of Anti-Jewish Violence: Rethinking the Pogrom in East European History (Indiana University Press, 2010). He is currently a fellow at the Cullman Center at the New York Public Library and is finishing his book "Republic of Beggars": The Jewish Destitute, Disabled, and Dispossessed in Tsarist Russia.

Learn more information and RSVP.

A joint event of the History Department, and Jewish Studies at Fordham University and the New York Public Library.

Thursday, March 30, 2017, 12 p.m. | Flom Auditorium, the Walsh Family Library
“The Roadmap for A Shared Society, or How Jews and Arabs Can Live and Prosper Together”

Givat Haviva, founded in 1949 as the national education center of the Kibbutz Federation in Israel, is home to The Center for a Shared Society, which aims to build an inclusive society in Israel by engaging divided communities in collective action towards the advancement of a sustainable, thriving Israeli democracy based on mutual responsibility, civic equality and a shared vision of the future.

Yaniv Sagee, Executive Director of Givat Haviva, and Mohammad Darawshe, Director of the Center for Equality & Shared Society at Givat Haviva will discuss their programs, and goals. The event will be moderated by Dr. Samuel Peleg, who teaches a course on "Democracy, Terrorism, Modern Life" on the Rose Hill Campus.

Learn more information and RSVP.

Monday, April 3, 2017, 2:30 p.m. | TBA
Love is a Family Value: Tales from the Front Lines of Israeli Religious-LGBT Dialogue
A talk by Benjamin A Katz a senior board member of Shoval: Education for Tolerance

Benjamin A Katz is a senior board member of Shoval: Education for Tolerance, an Israeli organization that hosts dialogue sessions between religious LGBT people, and religious education, mental health, and community institutions. Shoval hosts about 50 sessions, and attends or hosts about six conferences per year across Israel. Benjamin will speak about his experiences leading Shoval, as well as the shared experiences of Israeli LGBT activists, working in an otherwise conservative community and political environment. Benjamin is also a registered psychologist, currently performing doctoral research at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Learn more information and RSVP.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 | Fordham Law School, 150 West 62nd Street, Room 3-01
“Unlikely Allies in the Face of Hate: Jews and Muslims in Trump's America”
A Lecture by Samuel Freedman

Bomb threats against Jewish community centers and cultural institutions, vandalism of Jewish cemetaries, along with attacks against mosques, swastika graffittis, all are among the rise in hate incidents in the recent months.

Samuel G. Freedman is an award-winning author, columnist, and professor. A former long-time columnist for The New York Times and a current professor at Columbia University, Freedman is the author of the seven acclaimed books, most recently Breaking The Line: The Season in Black College Football That Transformed the Game and Changed the Course of Civil Rights (2013). His previous books are Small Victories: The Real World of a Teacher, Her Students and Their High School (1990); Upon This Rock: The Miracles of a Black Church (1993); The Inheritance: How Three Families and America Moved from Roosevelt to Reagan and Beyond (1996); Jew vs. Jew: The Struggle for the Soul of American Jewry (2000); Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's Life (2005); and Letters to a Young Journalist (2006).

For more information, contact Magda Teter at 347-364-3472 or JewishStudies@fordham.edu.

Learn more information and RSVP.

May 3, 2017, 6 p.m. | School of Law, 150 West 62nd Street, Room 1-01
"Roots Resilience Renewal (Polish Jews: 1975-2016)"
Chuck Fishman, Photographer

From 1975–1983 Fishman photographed what was then a dwindling remnant of a once vibrant Jewish community, a thousand years of history on the brink of extinction. Returning to Poland after a 30-year hiatus, he has begun documenting a stunning reversal of history—a Jewish cultural renaissance, an extraordinary ‘return to identity’ taking place there today.

Learn more information and RSVP.

A joint event of Fordham’s Jewish Studies Program, the Derfner Judaica Museum in Riverdale, and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

Fall 2016

Lincoln Center

Thursday, October 6, 6 p.m.
Fordham Law, 150 West 62nd Street, Room 3-02

"Modern Myths of Muslim Antisemitism"
Mark Cohen, The Khedouri A. Zilkha Professor of Jewish Civilization in the Near East, Emeritus, Princeton University

With antisemitism widespread in the Muslim world, Professor Mark Cohen will explore the roots of antisemitism in the Muslim world, the history of Jewish-Muslim relations, and the modern context of these two groups.

Wednesday, October 26, 6 p.m.
Fordham Law, 150 West 62nd Street, Room 2-01A

“Scholem In Love: Affective Ties of a Jewish Historian”
David Biale, the Emanuel Ringelblum Distinguished Professor of Jewish History, University of California at Davis

Professor David Biale will explore affective ties had with both men and women as the young Gershom Scholem, who would become the most important scholar of Jewish mysticism, came to choose both his intellectual and personal path.

Wednesday, November 2, 6 p.m.
Fordham Law, 150 West 62nd Street, Room 2-01A

"Is Peace Possible? The Israel/Palestine Pulse"
A Presentation by Professors Tamar Hermann and Khalil Shikaki 

Two research partners, Khalil Shikaki, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research, and Tamar Hermann, Professor of Political Science at the Open University and a Senior Fellow at the Israel Democracy Institute, will discuss their new joint research project: "Is Peace Possible? The Israel/Palestine Pulse." 

The project highlights similiaries and constracts among Israelis and Palestinians. In addition, the colleagues will address the sacred values that impede peace efforts, domestic actors who promote or resist a peace settlement, incestives that might garner support for peace, and the role of external players.

Tuesday, November 15, 6 p.m.
Lincoln Center, Lowenstein 12th Floor Lounge

"Wisdom and Learning: Jewish, Christian and Muslim Approaches to Higher Education"
McGinley Lecture, Patrick Ryan, SJ
Response from Magda Teter and Ebru Turan

Thursday, December 1, 6 p.m.
Erica Lehrer, Concordia University, Fordham Law, 150 West 62nd Street, Room 4-09
“Lucky Jews? Contested objects in Poland's heritage industries”

Anthropologist Erica Lehrer will discuss Polish-made figurines depicting Jews, a controversial phenomenon with diverse historical precedents and a new popularity today.

Lecture Open to Public. This is a joint event with the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

Thursday, December 1, 6 p.m.
“Lucky Jews? Contested objects in Poland's heritage industries”
Erica Lehrer, Concordia University, Fordham Law, 150 West 62nd Street, Room 4-09

Anthropologist Erica Lehrer will discuss Polish-made figurines depicting Jews, a controversial phenomenon with diverse historical precedents and a new popularity today.

Rose Hill

Tuesday, September 13, 5:30 p.m.
Walsh Library, O’Hare Room

“Women Wage Peace Movement: The Role of Women in the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process,”
Amal Abu Ramadan and Vardit Kaplan
Discussion moderated by John Davenport, Director of Peace and Justice Studies Program.

Amal Abu-Ramadan and Vardit Kaplan, a Muslim Palestinian citizen of Israel and a Jewish citizen of Israel, respectively, both from Tel Aviv/Jaffa, are active leaders of the Women Wage Peace movement and will share the movement’s vision, challenges, accomplishments and future actions.
Co-sponsored by Center for Ethics Education; Jewish Studies; Peace and Justice Studies Program; Department of Theology; Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program.

Wednesday, September 14, 12 p.m.
O’Hare Special Collections, Walsh Family Library

“Simon of Trent a Liminal Figure in Jewish-Christian Relations”
Medieval Lecture
Magda Teter
Lecture for faculty and students.

Unlike earlier medieval persecutions of Jews accused of murdering Christian children, whose impact was rather local, the story of Simon of Trent, who was found dead in 1475, spread far and wide, influencing for centuries to come anti-Jewish trials, their visual representation, Jewish defense, and even canon law. This lecture will sketch the reasons why the figure of Simon of Trent became a liminal and key figure in shaping Jewish-Christian relations.

Monday, November 7, 12 p.m.
Jean Yves Camus, a leading scholar, public intellectual, and a researcher on the French right and Islamic extremism, will on “A New Antisemitism: An Assessment of the French Situation.”

Jean-Yves Camus is researcher at IRIS (French Institute for Strategic and International Affairs), director of the Observatory of Political Radicalism at the Jean Jaurès Foundation. He is the author of many books on French Right. Jean-Yves Camus was a researcher at CERA (Centre Européen de Recherche et d’Action sur le Racisme et l’Antisémitisme). He supervised research projects for the PNR 40+ “Left-wing Extremism” of Fond National Suisse (2002-2004),on the islamophobic analysis in the French newspapers for the FRA (European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights). Camus is currently a member of the European Consortium on Political Research and of the Task Force on Antisemitism at the European Jewish Congress.

Wednesday, November 16, 6 p.m.
Flom Auditorium in the Walsh Family Library

"Wisdom and Learning: Jewish, Christian and Muslim Approaches to Higher Education"
McGinley Lecture
Patrick Ryan, SJ
Response from Magda Teter and Ebru Turan Lecture

Tuesday, November 29, 5.30 p.m.
Flom Auditorium at Walsh Library

"Judaism, Christianity, and the Origin of Religion in Late Antiquity,”
In Dialogue Series: Adam Becker, NYU, and Annette Reed, University of Pennsylvania:
Reception to follow.

In this public conversation, Adam H. Becker and Annette Yoshiko Reed will reflect upon new trends in research on Judaism, Christianity, and the parting of ways.

Spring 2016

Lincoln Center

March 14, 6 p.m.
Location: Fordham Law, LAW 3-02
Moshe Rosman, Bar-Ilan University, "How To Tell The Story: Jewish Museums, Jewish History, Jewish Metahistory."
Open to public.

Contemporary historical museums tend not to exhibit artifacts. They use multi-media to tell a story. This story is an interpretation of history designed to convey a message. The illustrated lecture will analyze how five Jewish historical museums—Beit Hatefutsot in Tel Aviv, Jüdisches Museum Berlin, Musée d'art et d'histoire du Judaïsme in Paris, Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center in Moscow, and POLIN: Museum of the History of Polish Jews—interpret Jewish history and the means by which they transmit their messages. A joint program with YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

March 2, 6:30 p.m.
Location: Fordham Law School, LAW 1-01
Marc Epstein, Vassar College, and Sara Lipton, SUNY-Stony Brook, "Jews in Medieval Art: A View from the Inside and Outside," (Co-sponsored by Jewish Studies, the Center for Medieval Studies, and Art History and Music).
Open to public.

Tuesday, May 3, 6 p.m.
Location: Fordham Law School, Room 3-01
Stanislaw Krajewski, " Moral, Political, and Historical Considerations in the Post-World War II Exhibit at the Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw." A YIVO-Fordham joint program.

The Post-World-War II section of the core exhibition at POLIN, the Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw, while subject to the general assumptions and guidelines that applied throughout the whole museum, had to face specific problems that ranged from historical to political to moral. Stanisław Krajewski, a professor at the University of Warsaw and one of the founders of the Polish-Israeli Friendship Society and of the Polish Council of Christians and Jews, will discuss how the Museum, and he as the responsible curator faced the challenge to present post-1945 history of Polish Jews.

Rose Hill

Monday, April 18, 4:30 p.m.
Location: Rose Hill Walsh Library Auditorium
Sara Abrevaya Stein, "Family Papers: A Sephardic Journey through the Twentieth Century.

Tuesday, April 5, 2:30 - 5 p.m.
Location: Rose Hill
Melanie Holcomb and Barbara Boehm (Metropolitan Museum of Art), "From Jerusalem to NYC: Curating Medieval Jerusalem at the Met/Cloisters," reception to follow.

Monday, April 4, 5:30 p.m.
Location: Flom Auditorium Walsh Library, Rose Hill
Judith Altmann, a Holocaust survivor, will speak about remembering history, “Zakhor…Remember.” A reception will follow.

March 29, 2016, 1 p.m.
Location: O'Hare Special Collections, Walsh Library, Rose Hill
Exhibition "Passover and Easter: A Polemical Encounter," Gallery talk with Professors Sarit Kattan Gribetz and Magda Teter.

March 15 - May 15, Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Location: O'Hare Special Collections, Walsh Library, Rose Hill
Exhibition "Passover and Easter: A Polemical Encounter"

February 10, 9:30 - 11 a.m.
Location: Rose Hill, Duane 140
Elisheva Baumgarten (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), "Gender and Medieval Jewish Piety," co-sponsored with the Gender and Religion seminar.
Breakfast will be served, open to faculty and students.

Fall 2015

Lincoln Center

Tuesday, November 10, 6 p.m.
The annual Fall McGinley Lecture, Patrick J. Ryan, SJ, "Rejecting Hatred: Fifty Years of Catholic Dialogue with Jews and Muslims Since Nostra Aetate,” The lecture will be followed by a Jewish response by Professor Magda Teter, PhD, Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies at Fordham, and a Muslim response by Adjunct Assistant Professor of Religion Hussein Rashid, PhD, of Hofstra University.
Location: 12th-floor Lounge, Lowenstein Center, Fordham University Lincoln Center Campus

Monday, 16 November 2015, 5:30 p.m.
Installation of the Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies
Professor: Magda Teter, PhD
Location: Lowenstein Center / 12th Floor Lounge

Rose Hill

Thursday, September 17, 1 p.m.
Sarit Kattan-Gribetz (Fordham University)
Mothers in the Manuscripts: Christian Origins according to the Jewish Life of Jesus (Toledot Yeshu)
Location: McGinley Music Room

Wednesday, September 30, 4 p.m.
Anne Golomb Hoffman will deliver the English Department Inaugural Lecture, "Words and Pictures, Bodies and Books."
Location: Walsh Library

Tuesday, October 13, 6.30 p.m.
The first joint YIVO-CJH-Fordham event: Ida: Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of Nostra Aetate, screening and discussion of the Oscar winning film "Ida"

Wednesday, November 11, 6 p.m.
The annual Fall McGinley Lecture, Patrick J. Ryan, SJ, "Rejecting Hatred: Fifty Years of Catholic Dialogue with Jews and Muslims Since Nostra Aetate,” The lecture will be followed by a Jewish response by Professor Magda Teter, PhD, Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies at Fordham, and a Muslim response by Adjunct Assistant Professor of Religion Hussein Rashid, PhD, of Hofstra University
Location: Walsh Library, Rose Hill Campus, Bronx, NY

Thursday, December 3, 2015, 1 p.m.
Introducing Fordham’s Judaica Collection
Professor Magda Teter, the Shvilder Chair in Judaic Studies will lead a tour of the new acquisitions in Judaica at the Special Collections at Fordham. The highlights include the facsimile of the 14th-century Barcelona Haggadah, a gift from Dr. James Leach, early Hebrew books from the sixteenth century published in Venice, Constantinople, Cracow, Mantua, Sabionetta and other places. They all reveal fascinating stories of human drama, business competition, and transformations in religious traditions, and connections between Jewish and Christian societies.
Where: Special Collections, Fourth Floor, Walsh Library

Friday, December 11, 2015, 1 p.m.
Introducing Fordham’s Judaica Collection
Professor Magda Teter, the Shvilder Chair in Judaic Studies will lead a tour of the new acquisitions in Judaica at the Special Collections at Fordham. The highlights include the facsimile of the 14th-century Barcelona Haggadah, a gift from Dr. James Leach, early Hebrew books from the sixteenth century published in Venice, Constantinople, Cracow, Mantua, Sabionetta and other places. They all reveal fascinating stories of human drama, business competition, and transformations in religious traditions, and connections between Jewish and Christian societies.
Where: Special Collections, Fourth Floor, Walsh Library