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Courses Related to Disability

American Studies

AMST 2000 - Major Developments in American Culture (4 credits) (When taught by Prof. James Fisher)
TBA
An interdisciplinary history of American cultural traditions. Students will be introduced to major developments in American culture, arts, literature, folk culture, thought, and media. The course sets transformations in culture in the context of American political, social, religious, and economic history.

Communication

COMM 3247 - Race, Class, and Gender in Media (4 credits)
W | 11:30 a.m. - 2:15 p.m.| Margaret Schwartz
This class analyzes representations of social class, racial and ethnic identity, and gender and sexuality in media. We begin our work with two assumptions. First, that media both shape and are shaped by social conceptions. Second, that these categories—race, class, and gender—are embodied, that is, they describe different physical bodies that inhabit real, lived environments. From there, students learn to identify central themes and problems in representing differences of race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality in fiction and nonfiction media. The class will use a mixture of hands-on activities with contemporary media (such as blogging, journaling, and online discussion) plus more traditional readings about theories of representation and embodiment. The course is intended as a learning environment where students are able to do more than simply identify stereotypes. Rather, they intervene in these representations, actively critiquing stereotypes and moving past them towards a reflective attitude about the relationship between society as it is lived for people of different racial, sexual, and class groups—and the image of those groups as depicted in media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMM 1101 - Communications and Culture: History, Theory, and Methods
T F |11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.| Kimberly Casteline
An introduction to the history, theory, and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This serves as the required introductory course for the major in Communication and Culture. It provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction

COMM 1101 - Communications and Culture: History, Theory, and Methods
M T | 10 - 11:15 a.m. | Timothy Wood
An introduction to the history, theory and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This serves as the required introductory course for the major in Communication and Culture. It provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction

COMM 1101 - Communications and Culture: History, Theory, and Methods
W F | 8:30- 9:45 a.m. | Thomas McCourt
An introduction to the history, theory and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This serves as the required introductory course for the major in Communication and Culture. It provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction

COMM 1101 - Communications and Culture: History, Theory, and Methods
T | 6 - 8:45 p.m. | Timothy Wood
An introduction to the history, theory, and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This serves as the required introductory course for the major in Communication and Culture. It provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction

Disability Studies

DISA 2500 - Introduction To Disability Studies (4 credits)
M R | 2:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. | Sophie Mitra, Rebecca Sanchez | TBA
This course will introduce students to the multidisciplinary field of disability studies through an exploration of the diverse ways that disability signifies across the social sciences and humanities. It will interrogate the meanings of disability in a variety of contexts within the U.S. and beyond with a particular focus on the ways that disability intersects with other categories of lived experience (race, gender, sexuality, socio-economic class). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Economics

ECON 3570 - Labor Market and Diversity (4 credits) (When taught by Prof. Sophie Mitra)
TBA
The goal of this course is to enable students to think independently about the labor market and diversity issues. This course (a) provides an introduction to the economic analysis of behaviors and institutions in the labor market; and (b) give students the tools to deal with diversity questions within the labor market such as educational attainment, employment discrimination, and income inequality across disability, gender, and racial groups. Economic logic and evidence are used to analyze employer and employee decisions and the institutional factors shaping those decisions.

ECON 4020 - Disability: Economic and Other Approaches
TBA
This course is a critical survey of the research and analysis of disability definitions, measures and economic issues with a focus on the interaction between disability and the public policy arena in the United States. It uses economic models but also covers in-depth approaches and methodologies in other disciplines.

English

NSCI/ENGL 4172 Diverse Biology/Share Humanity

ENGL 4403 - The Extraordinary Bodies (4 credits)
T W | 1 - 2:15 p.m. | Elizabeth Frost | TBA
From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 3646 - Black Disability Studies (4 credits)
M R | 10 - 11:15 a.m. | DennisTyler | TBA
This course will examine the intersections of blackness and disability in African American literature and culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. We will consider how disablement as experience and as discourse has shaped racial subjecthood for African Americans, influencing notions of racial health and citizenship in the United States. In addition, we will explore how Black writers, thinkers, and activists acknowledge the ways disability intersects with blackness to understand more fully the complexities of racial injury and subjection. We will tackle these matters by examining the work of Henry Box Brown, William and Ellen Craft, James Weldon Johnson, Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison, Pearl Cleage, and Mamie Till-Mobley, among others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 3001 - Queer Theories (4 Credits)
T F | 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. | Corey McEleney
An introduction to the academic discipline of queer theory, focusing on foundational thinkers (e.g., Butler, Foucault, Sedgwick, and others) as well as their philosophical and psychoanalytic precursors and interlocutors. The course will also address selected issues currently under discussion in the discipline. These may include the role of activism, the relationship between queer theory and feminism theory, attention to race, and intersections with postcolonial theory. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Natural Sciences

NSCI 2018 - Biology of Aging (3 credits)
M R | 2:30 - 3:45 p.m. | Deborah C. Luckett | LL-512
Course Objectives: The emphasis in this course is to present knowledge regarding biological, anatomical, physiological, cytological and genetic changes in people during the aging process. This will be accomplished by 1) Giving the students a working knowledge of the literature 2) Having students present to their colleagues’ topics related to the aging community 4) Having students work on case studies scenarios affecting the aging population. 5) In addition, students will explore ethical issues associated with this particular group of society

NSCI/ENGL 4172 Diverse Biology/Share Humanity (4 Credits)

This course draws on readings and approaches from biology and literary studies to gain understanding of the diversity of human experience. Students will study the biological (genetic, metabolic, developmental, and neuronal) factors contributing to differences in human behavior, cognition, ability/disability, and appearance. Through the study of first-person narratives, poems, and other texts (including film), students will gain insight into the lived experiences of people they might not otherwise have come to know, even as they deepen their appreciation of the interdependence of self and other. Through reflection on readings in literature and science, students will come to recognize more fully what these disciplinary approaches offer to understanding our place in the world and our responsibilities to one another.

Attributes: BEHR, BESN, BIOE, DISA, ICC, PLUR.

Prerequisites: (ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MVST 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001) and (NSCI 1030 or NSCI 1080 or NSCI 1051).

Psychology

PSYCH 4310 - Aging and Society (4 Credits)
M R | 8:30 - 9:45 a.m. | TBA
A cross-disciplinary course that draws on research and theory from psychology and such other disciplines as sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science to explore the biological, cognitive and psychosocial features of human aging. Attention is given to normal and abnormal development, to the interrelations between physical and mental health and to optimal aging. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

PSYC 3930 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology (4 credits)
W | 8:30 - 11:15 a.m. | Renata Strashnaya | TBA
An introduction to clinical psychology, including major schools of clinical interventions, the relation between assessment and clinical practice, including specific areas of evaluation (such as intellectual, personality, and observational/behavioral). Areas of specialization will also be covered.

Sociology

SOCI 1050 - Inventing Ourselves: Personal Narrative and Identity (3 credits)
TBA

SOCI 3114 - Sociology of Health and Illness
TBA
This course focuses on health, illness, and medicine from a sociological perspective. It provides students with an overview of the development of medicine as in institution, the impact of medicine on society, the socialization of health care practitioners, the social determinants of health and illness, healthcare policies in the U.S. and around the world, and patients' experiences with illness. By the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) develop an understanding of the ways in which society and medicine influence each other, (2) connect multiple social factors with people's health; and (3) grasp the construction of diverse illness identities in patients with chronic diseases.

SOCI 4421 - Disability, Literature, Culture
TBA
Disability studies, the central focus of this course, is an inherently interdisciplinary field. Drawing particularly on two of its constituent disciplines, literature, and sociology, this course will explore the questions and problems raised by neurological, mental and cognitive disabilities, as they relate to identity, community, and belonging.

Theology

THEO 3877 - Religion and the American Self (When taught by Prof. James Fisher)

TBA | TBA | TBA | TBA
A course in historical theology that examines the role of religion in the formation of American social and political culture. The course will utilize various interpretive approaches to uncover how the "American self" is both the most religious and the most secular in the industrialized West.

Graduate School of Education

CTGE 5155 - Special Education Foundations
TH | 8 - 9:30 p.m. | Cho Su-Je | TBA
Trace the principles, policies, practices, and perspectives of special education over time in the US and other countries. Students shall complete 8 hours field work focused on students with disabilities. Pre-Requisite for all special education courses.

CTGE 5170 - Assessment of Children with Disabilities
W | 7 - 9 p.m. | Diane Rodriguez | TBA
Examine assessments to determine eligibility for special education and responsiveness to instruction, including norm-referenced text, criterion-referenced assessment tasks, and curriculum-based assessments.

CTGE 5421 - Planning Instruction for Young Children with Disabilities
W | 7 - 9 p.m. | Zhang Chun | TBA
This course shall enable students to structure physical and social environments and to develop and implement instructional and intervention plans and procedures that are developmentally appropriate and respectful of family, cultural, language, and social diversity.

PSGE 5301 - Psychological Factors in Young Children with Disabilities
M | 4:50 - 6:50 p.m. | Zhang Chun | TBA
Psychological Factors in Young Children with Disabilities (PSY FACTORS YOUNG CHILD W/DISABIL) This course provides an overview of the characteristics of disabling conditions in young children. It introduces the psychological, environmental and biological conditions, and the interactions among them that place children at risk for developmental delays and disabilities. It discusses the sociocultural and political contexts impacting child development, and the effectiveness of various intervention approaches and models so as to provide students with a knowledge base and skills for interventions.

Social Service

SWGS 6050 — Human Rights and Social Justice (3 credits)
TBA
This course is an introduction to the human rights and social justice perspectives and how they intersect with social work history, values, ethics, and practice in local and global contexts. Students will learn a practice framework that integrates a human rights perspective promoting the dignity, respect, and well-being of all persons with a social justice perspective which seeks to understand, challenge, and combat oppression, unequal access to resources, and social inequities. Students engage in critical self-awareness and apply an integrated practice framework for use with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities that advance human rights and social and economic justice.

SWGS 6409 — Practice with Older People and Their Families
TBA
This course focuses on direct practice with older people and their families. The course examines the social context of aging, the aging process, associated changes, and the effects on older people and their families. Emphasis is on the nature of support systems and the social work role in maintaining and enhancing older people’s functioning and well-being.