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Emperor Henry IV:
Tolls on Craftsmen at Coblenz, 1104


The Emperor Henry IV renewed or confirmed a grant of the tolls at Coblenz previously made by Archbishop Poppo to the monastery of St. Simeon. The right to collect tolls could be granted in the same way as the right to hold a fief. This document is of special interest because of its references to tolls levied on travelling craftsmen.

Bakers of that place, whoever they be, or wherever they be, who sell bread there will give one loaf to the toll-gatherer every Sunday, or one obole every fourteen days.

Cobblers, coming from elsewhere, will not dare to sell shoes there without permission of the tollgatherer or of his officer. Cobblers of this place convene three times voluntarily at the court, and then each will give one denarius, and on the feast of St. Martin, five denarii.

Also, the tax of shoemakers coming from elsewhere will be given to them from Lady Day up to Martinmas. But for this they will give the toll-gatherer and eight monks a good banquet. But the toll-gatherer will give them six set rs of wine, and a cheese which can be carried in one hand.


Source:

H. G. Gengler, ed., Codex Juris Municipalis Germaniae, (Erlangen: F. Enke, 1867), p. 499; reprinted in Roy C. Cave & Herbert H. Coulson, A Source Book for Medieval Economic History, (Milwaukee: The Bruce Publishing Co., 1936; reprint ed., New York: Biblo & Tannen, 1965), p.408.

Scanned by Jerome S. Arkenberg, Cal. State Fullerton. The text has been modernized by Prof. Arkenberg.


This text is part of the Internet Medieval Sourcebook. The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts related to medieval and Byzantine history.

Unless otherwise indicated the specific electronic form of the document is copyright. Permission is granted for electronic copying, distribution in print form for educational purposes and personal use. If you do reduplicate the document, indicate the source. No permission is granted for commercial use.

© Paul Halsall, October 1998
halsall@fordham.edu