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History Graduate Courses

The department of history usually offers six graduate courses each semester. Most courses are rotated on a two- to three-year cycle. Required courses are offered every year, such as History Theory and Methods, the Pedagogy Tutorial, and the proseminar and seminar sequences.

Classes meet at both the Rose Hill and Lincoln Center campuses. Check My Fordham for current information on meeting times and places.

Course syllabuses or descriptions for many courses are available by clicking on the course number. Visit graduate course descriptions for a more complete listing of course descriptions.

Fall 2022

HIST 5553 Book History: Texts, Media and Communications 
Tu 2:30-5pm

Prof. Thierry Rigogne

This course builds on the concepts developed in book history to explore the history of media and communication in general, as well as textual scholarship. Topics range across time periods and continents, with particular focus on the medieval and early modern transitions, as well as on more recent “media revolutions.” The course will introduce graduate students to key works, concepts and methodologies that analyze how communication media of all sorts (from manuscripts to printed books, newspapers and images, and from songs and rumors to audiovisual and digital media) have been a driving force in history, and understand how they have shaped all historical research. We will study texts and methods drawn from a wide variety of historical fields, as well as from sociology, anthropology, philosophy, literary criticism, art history, bibliography and media studies, all of which provide historians with powerful insights and indispensable tools and skills.

HIST 5300 History Theory and Methods: The Historian's Tools                       
W 5:30-8pm

Prof. Grace Shen

This course will introduce students to a range of intellectual traditions informing historical analysis and writing. Students will study major social thinkers and how historians have grappled with the implications of their ideas. The course aims to develop essential skills as professional readers, analysts researchers and writers. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5563 Readings in Environmental History  
Th 2:30-5pm LC

Prof Steven Stoll

This course presents some of the best recent scholarship in North American Environmental History, as well several of the field's founding texts, together spanning the human history of North America, from Indigenous settlement to the twenty-first century. Students will write two historiographical essays on aspects of the readings and participate vigorously in discussion.

HIST 5566 Technology and Empire                     
M 2:30-5pm

Prof. Asif Siddiqi

This course, "Science, Technology, and Imperialism," will explore the crucial relationship between science and imperialism, with a particular focus on European imperial expansion from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Students will use a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to raise and reframe fundamental questions about the role of science and technology as "tools of empire". For example, the course will explore how the equation of European science and technology with "progress" depended to a large degree on European perceptions of the colonized. Using multiple viewpoints from Europe, Africa, and India, the course will provide a fresh and unique view on the history of Imperialism that will locate science and technology as fundamental to understanding such contested concepts as conquest, progress, and modernity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5731 History of Wealth & Poverty: U.S. and Comparative                    
Th 5:30-8pm LC

Prof. Kirsten Swinth

Americans have long debated the meaning of wealth and poverty, questioning whether such conditions are natural (and acceptable), or the product of exploitative practices, corruption, or biased governmental policy (and potentially alterable). Over time they have questioned the relationships among economic inequality, free markets, democracy, thriving families and communities, social disparities, and the welfare state. We will explore these and other questions focusing on the U.S. since 1865 but with substantial comparisons to Europe, Africa, and Latin America. The class takes an intersectional perspective that brings questions of race and gender, as well as social class, to bear on the topic. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6077 The Angevin Empire             
M 1:30-4 pm

Prof. Nicholas Paul

From the Middle of the twelfth until the first quarter of the thirteenth centuries, one dynasty, the house of Anjou, were the effective rulers of an enormous agglomeration of kingdoms and principalities which stretched from the North Sea to the Mediterranean and encompassed England, large parts of Ireland, Wales, and nearly half of the territory which today constitutes modern France. Following a wave of renewed scholarly interest in the politics and culture of this period, this class will explore this short-lived but powerful empire, its lands, peoples and rulers. Together we will explore the lives of dynamic individuals within the Angevin court; Angevin court culture, the governance of a medieval "empire"; dynastic politics and diplomacy; the Third Crusade; and England and France after the loss of Normandy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 7026 Classics in the Middle Ages (Proseminar)              
F 2:30-5pm

Prof. Scott Bruce

This seminar deals primarily with the transmission and reception in western Europe of classical Greek and Latin texts written before 525 CE, with a focus on the Latin tradition. The overarching aim of the seminar is to highlight the achievement of the Latin Middle Ages in preserving the ancient classics and appropriating them for new uses in a Christian civilization. It treats the most influential authors in the medieval schools (Virgil, Horace, and Ovid), as well as the persistence of the most prominent genres of classical literature, including didactic poetry, drama, elegy, encyclopedic works, epic poetry, epigram, grammatical works, historical writings, legal works, literary criticism, lyric poetry, oratory, philosophical writings, prose fiction, and satire. Lastly, the seminar also considers centers of transmission, book collections, and the medieval commentary tradition.

HIST 5456 20th Century Catholic Cultural Revival           
T 5:30-8pm

Prof. Fr. Steven Schoesser

This is a course in late-modern European and American cultural and intellectual history. Late-19th-century positivism and historicism reduced the boundaries of the “real” to the visible and observable—i.e., to what we might call today (in light of Charles Taylor’s now-classic "A Secular Age" [2007]) an “immanent frame.” In response, Catholic philosophers, novelists, musicians, and artists constructed their own world which took them, in the words of the philosopher Gabriel Marcel, beyond “morality into metaphysics.” In France, this Catholic revival—frequently referred to in English as either the “intellectual” or “literary” revival—was known as the "renouveau catholique": the Catholic renovation or renewal. It had its parallel in Great Britain and migrated to the United States, especially after the Second World War’s end in 1945. This course’s working thesis is that certain Catholic artists and thinkers evolved a “sacramental modernism” in response to their experience of the late-19th and early-20th centuries. On the one hand, this suggests a universality in Catholic imaginations that transcends historical epochs: namely, a “sacramentality” or belief in a God at once transcendent yet deeply immanent. On the other hand, this universality was uniquely instantiated in highly-particular late-modern contexts. Most notably, the concept of divine “immanence” was confronted by two World Wars, fascism, communism, the Great Depression, the Holocaust, and the possibility of global atomic annihilation throughout the Cold War (1945-1989). As a result, the Catholic intellectual revival throughout the 20th century produced paradoxical “sacramental” representations: of a “mystery” that is often dark to the point of grotesquery; yet which, at the same time, is capable of tethering tenuous human history to some kind of enduring significance. This course will sample some of those representations of mystery. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Pages in History Graduate Courses