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MLL French

Students who intend to major in French Language and Literature or French Studies, or minor in French should prepare their schedules in consultation with a French faculty adviser. To declare the major or the minor and be assigned an adviser, please contact the Department Associate Chair in your college.


The major in French language and literature is available at Fordham College at Rose Hill and Fordham College at Lincoln Center. Students in Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies may minor in French only if their schedules are sufficiently flexible to permit them to take day classes at the Rose Hill or Lincoln Center campuses.

Majors in French language and literature will take a minimum of 10 courses numbered 1502 (French Intermediate II) and higher and at least six courses numbered 3000 and above. The French literature major prepares students with a thorough knowledge of French/Francophone language and literature. Students will study significant authors and problems in or across specific time periods. Close textual analysis informed by historical and cultural understanding will be complemented by current critical perspectives, theories, and methodologies. Students will be required to choose from a variety of courses spanning the medieval to the contemporary period that have been divided into three groups. Students will start the major with FREN 1502, FREN 2001, will take a 2000-level course after 2001 (either 2600, 2620, 2630), and then will proceed to the seven 3000-level courses.

In addition to gaining a thorough understanding of French/Francophone literature, majors will also be expected to have achieved fluency and correct use of the language in their spoken as well as written presentations and work. All French literature courses are taught in French, and students will be regularly required to participate orally in class discussions and/or make oral presentations as appropriate in addition to their written work.

The French literature major requires the following courses:

Group I: FREN 2600-France: Literature, History, Civilization; FREN 2630-Translation Techniques; FREN 2620-Composition and Conversation;

[1 of the preceding courses]

Group II: Medieval and Renaissance period (1 course)

Group III: 17th and 18th Centuries (1 course)

Group IV: 19th and 20th/21st Centuries (1 course)

Group V: Francophonie (1 course from Medieval to present that focuses on an aspect of Francophonie); This course can double-count to fulfill a course in groups I—IV.

Electives: 3000-level course (3 courses in any of the periods)

Study Abroad Policy
Majors in French language and literature are highly encouraged to spend an academic semester or year studying in a Francophone country. Students are encouraged to take a wide range of upper-level courses in the humanities and even social sciences provided they are taught in French and have a rigorous course of study. Upon discussion and approval with their major adviser and the successful completion of the course (C or higher), students studying abroad for an academic year can receive credit for up to five courses toward their major; students studying for a semester can receive credit up to four courses toward their major; Courses in the humanities would satisfy the period requirements listed above. Thus if a student took an 18th-century French painting and architecture course, it would count as an 18th-century course in group III.

Programs that provide direct enrollment in the host nation’s university system are particularly encouraged, as are family stays.

Note: Please consult with your French study abroad adviser for a list of department-approved programs prior to their going abroad.

Senior Thesis
For students who exhibit exceptional potential and intellectual curiosity, and have a minimum of 3.67 in the major, they may choose to write a senior honor’s thesis. By May 15 of their junior year, candidates will have found a thesis advisor and submitted a one-page topic proposal. Students will register for FREN 4999 Senior Thesis Tutorial during the Fall semester of senior year. The candidate will begin reading over the summer to refine their thesis topic and submit a five-page description as well as a more detailed bibliography by the end of September. A second reader will then be appointed by the French program in consultation with the student. By late October, students will submit their final abstract stating the thesis, the contribution of the research project and the methodology pursued. A draft of about 10 to 15 pages will be required by the end of the fall semester, around December 1. Another draft of 10-15 more pages will be submitted by mid-February and the final draft will be submitted, read and discussed with the adviser mid-march. The completed thesis will be presented at a thesis defense in the final weeks of the spring semester during the senior year. The thesis must be written in French and normally will be 30 to 35 pages in length. Students can count the one tutorial/independent study course toward the 10 required courses for the major.

Honors
Honors in French language and literature will be given only to those students who have a minimum of a 3.67 in the major and who have completed an outstanding honor's thesis.

The Major in French Studies
The major in French area studies is available at Fordham College at Rose Hill and Fordham College at Lincoln Center. Students in Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies may minor in French only if their schedules are sufficiently flexible to permit them to take day classes at the Rose Hill or Lincoln Center campuses.

The French area studies major is an individualized interdisciplinary major consisting of 10 courses numbered 1502 (Intermediate French II) and higher and will normally include FREN 2001 and FREN 2600. The French studies major prepares students with a thorough knowledge of French/Francophone culture with a concentration on a particular target area or track. Students will develop an individual course of study in close consultation with their adviser and will take courses in and outside of the department. Students will be required to keep a portfolio of all their work, provide a written proposal of their unique course of study, and complete a final presentation during the spring of their senior year in which they demonstrate their independent work in the target field. The majority of classes will be taught in French, but up to three related classes in a target area or track may be taken in English when necessary upon the approval of the adviser. All French studies majors are required to consult closely with their adviser to assure the compatibility, relevance, and rigor of courses taught outside of the department. Students wishing to take courses outside of the department should provide their adviser with a copy of the course’s syllabus for pre-approval before registering for the course. Students will start the major with FREN 1502, followed by 2001, then will take at least one 2000-level course after 2001 before they proceed to the remaining seven upper-level courses in their target area or track.

In addition to gaining a thorough understanding of French/Francophone culture, majors will also be expected to have achieved fluency and correct use of the language in their spoken as well as written presentations and work. As French studies majors will be taking French literature courses in French as part of their major, they will be regularly required to participate orally in class discussions and/or make oral presentations as appropriate in addition to their written work in French. 

Below is a sample of tracks. Students can work with their individual adviser to devise their own track when and if necessary.

Track 1

French and Visual Arts (Film)/Theater
FREN 1502; FREN 2001; five 2000/3000-level courses in French preferably with a focus on arts (such as FREN 3333-Tableaux; FREN 3457-Le Flâneur à Paris; FREN 3473-Visions of the Maghreb; up to three courses in visual arts/theater that explore literary and/or visual media from the French/Francophone world (courses could include COMM 3432-French Film; VART 1257-Avant-Garde Film/Video; THEA 2100-Theater Hist II: Medieval—Restoration; THEA 2200-Theater Hist III: The ‘Moderns’ to the Present; etc.)

Track 2

French and another related field in the humanities (anthropology, art history, history, philosophy, politics, etc.)
FREN 1502; FREN 2001; five 2000/3000-level courses in French preferably related; up to three upper-level courses in the related field. (Such related fields could include French and Comp. Lit; French and Politics; French and Art History; and French and Religion/Theology)

Track 3

French and Women Studies
FREN 1502; FREN 2001; FREN 2600-Literature, History, Civilization; four of the following: FREN 3467-Women of God, Court and Arms; FREN 3150-Medieval Saints and Sinners; FREN 3340-Neo-Classical French Women Writers; Women on the Margins in 19th century France; FREN 3571-French Women Writers; FREN 3-Writers and Lawbreakers; FREN 3635-Francophone Women Writers; FREN 3575-French Feminism; two free French 3000-level elective; WMST 3010-Feminist Theory in Inter-Cult; WMST 3020-History and Contexts

Track 4

French and Theory
FREN 1502; FREN 2001; FREN 2600-Literature, History, Civilization; or FREN 2630-Translation Techniques; or FREN 2030-Composition; COLI-3000-Theories of Comparative Literature; PHIL 3652-Contemporary French Philosophy; PHIL 3600-Descartes and the Rationalists; or PHIL 3930-Philosophy and Literature; four 3000-level French electives

Track 5

France and Modernity
FREN 1502; FREN 2001; FREN 2600-France: Lit, Hist, Civ; FREN 3501-Modern Poetry; FREN 3561-Modern French Theater; FREN 3452-19th-Century Short Story; or FREN 3571-French Women Writers; or FREN 3565-French Contemporary Novel; one French 3000-level elective; COLI 3000-Theories of Comparative Literature; COLI 3431-From Realism to Modernism; COLI 3216-Lost Illusions; or COLI 3434-The Avant-Gardes: Europe and Latin America; or COLI 3450-The City in Literature and Art; or ENGL 4004-The 20s: Europe; or ENGL 3533-Modernist Poetry

Track 6

France and Europe
FREN 1502; FREN 2001; FREN 2600-France: Lit, Hist, Civ; FREN 2650-Business French; FREN 3005-Culture and Civilization; FREN 3006-France Today; one French 3000-level elective; HIST 3502-France since 1815; POSC 2604-European Politics

Track 7

Option A: Francophonie (Middle East/Maghreb)
FREN 1502; FREN 2001; FREN 2600; FREN 3455-Post-Colonial Representations; or its equivalent; FREN 3473-Visions du Maghreb; or its equivalent; three from the following: MEST 2000-Into to Modern Middle East; MEST 4001-Sem: Middle East; ANTH 3193-Peoples of the Middle East; ECON 3229-Political Economy of the Middle East; POSC 3520-Middle East and the World; HIST 1700-Intro to Middle East History; HIST 3981-The Modern Middle East. Students doing this track should seriously consider a concentration in Arabic and are encouraged to do study abroad in the Maghreb.

Option B: Francophonie (Africa)
FREN 1502; FREN 2001; FREN 2600; FREN 3455-Post-Colonial Representations; or its equivalent; FREN 3473-Visions du Maghreb; or its equivalent; one FREN 3000-level elective; three courses from the following: HIST 1600-Intro to African History. AFAM 3072-Civil Wars in Africa; AFAM 3075-Democracy in Africa; or AFAM 3688-African Literature; AFAM 3689-African Literature II; AFAM 3695-Major Debates in African Studies. Students are encouraged to do study abroad with the CIEE program in Senegal or in another sub-Saharan Francophone African country.

Option C: Francophonie (Global)
FREN 1502; FREN 2001; FREN 2600; FREN 3455-Post-Colonial Representations; four FREN 3000-level electives dealing with Francophone literature/culture such as Randall’s courses on Québecois literature, Schreier’s courses on the Maghreb and the Caribbean, Dudash’s courses on Medieval Francophonie, etc.; one FREN 3000-level elective; HIST 3541-France Since 1815.

This is by no means an exhaustive list, and faculty are encouraged to work with students to create tracks that correspond to the students’ interests and viable course of comparative study. The essential focus of the tracks should be, however, an opening of the study of the target language and its literature to other disciplines and modes of thought. This focus is in line with the University’s global initiative and with its desire to think across disciplinary boundaries. Of course, as the studies options evolve and as EP 3 and interdisciplinary courses are developed, more classes in the department might address some of these issues directly.

French Studies Senior year presentation
Studies majors will be required to make an oral/written presentation during the spring of their senior year in which they demonstrate their independent work in the target field. The presentation will give closure and provide assessment of the student’s progress, as well as of his/her critical and linguistic aptitude in French.

Senior Thesis
For students who exhibit exceptional potential and intellectual curiosity, and have a minimum of 3.67 in the major, they may choose to write a senior honor’s thesis. By May 15 of their junior year, candidates will have found a thesis advisor and submitted a one-page topic proposal. Students will register for FREN 4999 Senior Thesis Tutorial during the Fall semester of senior year. The candidate will begin reading over the summer to refine their thesis topic and submit a five-page description as well as a more detailed bibliography by the end of September. A second reader will then be appointed by the French program in consultation with the student. By late October, students will submit their final abstract stating the thesis, the contribution of the research project and the methodology pursued. A draft of about 10 to 15 pages will be required by the end of the fall semester, around December 1. Another draft of 10-15 more pages will be submitted by mid-February and the final draft will be submitted, read and discussed with the adviser mid-march. The completed thesis will be presented at a thesis defense in the final weeks of the spring semester during the senior year. The thesis must be written in French and normally will be 30 to 35 pages in length. Students can count the one tutorial/independent study course toward the 10 required courses for the major.

Honors
Honors in French area studies will be given to those students who have a minimum of a 3.67 in the major and who have completed an outstanding honor’s thesis.

Internships
Area studies majors have the option of signing up for an internship provided they submit a written proposal to their advisor before the beginning of the internship, meet with their adviser at least once a month to discuss the relevance of their work, and submit a final report at the end of the semester. Students wishing to receive 3 or 4 credits for an internship and have the course count as one of their 10 required courses for the major must meet at least once every two weeks with their adviser and produce a significant research paper at the end of the semester. The only internships to be considered will be directly connected to France / the Francophone world. Students will have to demonstrate that they use French on a weekly basis, and that the internship can be considered a valuable part of their education and course of study.

Double-Counting
Students can only double-count up to two courses toward their French major.