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Past Graduate Courses

Fall 2020 | Upcoming Courses | Past Courses

The diversity of faculty involved with the Center for Medieval Studies at Fordham University regularly allows for a wide variety of course offerings for graduate students. Below is an archive of courses offered over the past five years.

Spring/Summer 2020

Spring 2020

THEO 6042 (3) History of Jerusalem: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Perspectives
CRN 39394 (Kattan Gribetz) M 2:30 - 5 p.m.
In this course, students will learn about the ancient and medieval history of Jerusalem, from its Jebusite inhabitants before the time of King David through Suleiman’s construction of the modern city walls in the 1540s and the later Ottoman years. Students will gain experience analyzing a variety of sources—biblical and qur’anic texts, exegetical materials, travel narratives, legal documents, maps, poetry, literature, art, archaeology, and architecture—and use a range of different (inter)disciplinary and theoretical lenses through which to study them.

ENGL 5211 (3) Intro to Old English Language and Literature
CRN 40648 (Chase) T 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
This course is an introduction to Old English (Anglo-Saxon) language and literature. Old English was the language of England from the 7th to the 12th centuries, the language in which Beowulf was composed. We will read a representative selection of Anglo-Saxon prose and poetry in the original language, including The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, works by King Alfred and Bede, The Battle of Maldon, The Wanderer, The Seafarer, The Wife’s Lament, and The Dream of the Rood. Students will be introduced to Anglo-Saxon palaeography so that they can read the texts from medieval manuscripts as well as from printed editions.

HIST 6172 (4) Late Medieval and Early Modern Ireland
CRN 39491 (Maginn) W 2:30 - 5 p.m.
This course will examine the history of Ireland from the height of the so-called Gaelic Revival in the mid-14th century to the violent collapse of Gaelic rule and the completion of the Tudor conquest in the early 17th century. Beginning in the late medieval period with an exploration between English and Gaelic worlds, the class will then chart the protracted incorporation of Ireland into a highly centralized early modern English state under the Tudors. With emphasis placed on the latest scholarly.

MVST 5064 (4) The Divine Comedy: Poetry, Theology, and the Medieval Imagination
CRN 38947 (Susanna Barsella/Bob Davis) R 2:30 - 5 p.m.
This seminar offers an in-depth study of the poetic and theological imagination of Dante’s Divine Comedy. We will combine close reading of selected cantos with primary and secondary works illuminating key aspects of Dante’s literary and theological invention. Issues will be discussed within the historical and ideological contexts of the relevant theological and poetic debates in Dante's time. We will consider Dante’s theological influences, such as Augustine, Boethius, Bernard of Clairvaux, and Bonaventure, and explore theological topics such as medieval Christian practices of pilgrimage, scholastic debates about atonement and the afterlife, cosmology, and the relationship between erotic love and divine union in Christian mystical theology.

THEO 5230 (3) Advanced Greek: Early Christian Responses to Empire
CRN 27209 (Peppard) R 9 - 11:30 a.m.
This course includes both a rapid review of Greek grammar and syntax, and also intermediate/advanced readings from Hellenistic and/or early Christian texts.

PHIL 7058 (3) Bonaventure's Metaphysics
CRN: 39973 (Cullen) M 12:15 - 2:15 p.m.
This course will be a survey of the metaphysics of one of the great Scholastic thinkers of the Middle Ages- St. Bonaventure. Bonaventure says in a late set of university conferences that the whole of his metaphysics is found in emanation, exemplarity, and consummation. Students will examine all three parts of his metaphysics in order to obtain a synthetic view. This will involve examining his doctrine of being, including the transcendentals, his philosophical theology of God, and in particular, his exemplarism. Special attention will be given to Bonaventure’s reception of various Aristotelian doctrines and his attempt to synthesize these with various elements of the Augustinian and neo-Platonic heritage. 

The investigation of Bonaventure’s natural theology is now made possible by the recent translation of a major section of Bonaventure’s most important work, his Commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard. In addition, the class will examine his famous Journey of the Mind to God (Itinerarium mentis ad Deum) as well as his Disputed Questions on the Mystery of the Trinity. In short, the aim of the course is to provide participants with a comprehensive overview of Bonaventure’s metaphysical thought.

HIST 8025 (4) Medieval Religious Cultures
CRN 39490 (Bruce) F 2:30 - 5 p.m.
Debates in the study of medieval religious culture and approaches to its study will be examined through works on the cult of saints, popular religion, and liturgy and ritual. Issues presented in the current literature will be tested by the close reading of selected primary sources.

Summer 2020

Summer Session I

MVST 5708 (4) Struggling Toward God: Meditation and Prayer in the Eleventh- and Twelfth-Century Monastery
CRN TBA (Mancia) TR 11:00-3:00

This course explores the dimensions of the medieval monastic contemplation in the heyday of Benedictine and Cistercian spiritual writing, the eleventh and twelfth centuries. The course will aim to answer the following questions: What did extra-liturgical prayer and meditation look like for medieval monks and nuns? When, where, and how was it practiced? Was there a set way to engage with monastic meditation, or were there a variety of medieval monastic meditative experiences in the eleventh and twelfth centuries? What did monks and nuns perceive as the limitations of monastic prayer and meditation? What extra-textual tools did monks and nuns rely upon to stimulate their practices of meditation? And what does monastic meditation reveal about the emotional lives of Benedictine and Cistercian monks and nuns in the high Middle Ages? For more information, contact Prof. Lauren Mancia at laurenmancia@brooklyn.cuny.edu.

LATN 5090 (0)        Latin for Reading
CRN 10292 (McGowan) MW 1:00-4:00

A course designed for graduate students seeking a reading knowledge of Latin in their discipline. Some prior study of Latin is desirable but not necessary.

Summer Session II

LATN 5093 (3)        Ecclesiastical Latin
CRN 10305 (McGowan) MW 1:00-4:00

A study of the grammatical structure, form, and vocabulary of Church Latin, focusing on the Bible, the Church Fathers, and medieval thinkers.

Fall 2019

MVST 5077 (4) Editing Medieval Texts
CRN 40198 (Reilly) T 2:30-5:00
This course explores the theory and practice of editing, especially as it relates to medieval texts. We will study how different types of edition influence our readings of texts, whether in literary criticism, historiography, theology, or other disciplines of medieval studies. Through practical exercises and a final editorial project, we will see how such editions get made and what choices underlie them. Our choices will be informed by reading both foundational and contemporary articles that argue for a particular rationale or editorial practice (Lachmannian, Best-Text, facsimile, documentary, versioning, etc). Special attention will be given to editorial practice in the digital age.

ENGL 6212 (3) Medieval to Early Modern Drama
CRN 40702 (Erler) M 2:30-5:00
The great English medieval cycle plays have recently been re-appraised: the Chester plays are sixteenth century, performed after substantial religious change, and the Towneley plays probably represent a collection made for private reading. These are two examples of the way the course will examine the cultural context of late medieval/early modern English drama, including, for instance, some cycle plays, Mankynd, Everyman, (all in Middle English) Fulgens and Lucrece, Play of the Wether, and Marlowe's Doctor Faustus.

HIST 6136 (4) Disease in the Middle Ages
CRN 41145 (Mueller) R 5:30-8:00
The seminar will explore the history of disease in the West from about 500 to 1500, including sudden epidemics like the Black Death, endemic illnesses such as leprosy, and the rise of theoretical, scientific, and literate university medicine alongside the academic laggards of surgery and midwifery. Particularly attention will be paid to issues that highlight the close nexus between medical and social practices. What accounted for the medieval rise of many enduring institutions in the health sector, for example, faculties of medicine and university-trained health practitioners who brandished the lucrative title of ‘doctor’? What rendered medical know-how ‘scientific’ at the time and gave it its strong public appeal? What is the relationship between supposedly modern ‘empirical’ medicine and its older ‘scholastic’ counterpart? And to which degree can we hope to ‘diagnose’ the illnesses medieval people actually suffered from?  

HIST 7025 (4) PSM: Medieval Religious Cultures
CRN 41082 (Bruce) F 2:30-5:00
Debates in the study of medieval religious culture and approaches to its study will be examined through the lens of monasticism.  Topics of discussion will include the cult of the saints, popular religion, and the reception of the classical tradition.  Issues presented in the current literature will be tested by the close reading of selected primary sources.

THEO 6490 (3) Christianity and Violence
CRN 39985 (Demacopoulos) M 5:15-7:45
This course explores the often ambivalent relationship between Christianity and violence in the pre-modern world. Readings include a broad range of primary sources including martyr acts, liturgical hymns, canon law, and Crusader chronicles as well as influential scholarly assessments of the history of Christianity and violence. 

THEO 6465 (3) Asceticism and Monasticism
CRN 39984 (Lienhard) F 9:00-11:30
The course begins with a consideration of asceticism in Judaism, among pagans, and in early Christianity, including dedicated virginity, and then treats the history of the monastic movement up to the Carolingian era and Benedict of Aniane. The principal work of the course is reading and analyzing, in English translation, pertinent documents from this period, from four categories: lives of monks (Antony, Pachomius, Martin, Benedict), collected lives (Lausiac History, History of the Monks in Egypt, and others), rules (Basil, Augustine, the Master, Benedict), and theory (Evagrius of Pontus, John Cassian). Class reports and a substantial term paper are part of the course.

THEO 5300 (3) History of Christianity I
CRN 39980 (Lienhard) W 6:00-8:30
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the history of Christian doctrine and theology in the period from the end of New Testament times to 1500. Doctrine is what the church of Jesus Christ believes, teaches, and confesses on the basis of the word of God (J. Pelikan). Theology is reflection on doctrine in light of oneself, one’s world, and one’s experience. The course will run on two parallel tracks. One track will be lectures, which will treat, first, the formation of the canon of the Bible, and then four principal doctrines of Christian faith: the one God whose name is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; the person of Jesus the Christ, true God and true man; sin, grace, freedom, and predestination; and the presence of Christ in the Eucharist. The second track, which is intended to enhance participants’ understanding of the theologians and movements of the period, will consist of reading W. H. C. Frend’s Rise of Christianity, and five other short books, classics in the field, and reporting on them in writing. The course requires extensive reading, written reports, and one final examination; but, more than that, fascination with the best of Christian theologians and their thought.

PHIL 6505 (3) Medieval Philosophical Theories of the Fall                     
CRN 40153 (Pini) W 12:00-2:00
This course will be devoted to the study of some medieval interpretations of the Christian doctrines of the fall of the devil and of original sin. The focus will be philosophical. We will study the positions of Anselm of Canterbury, Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus. Some of the questions taken into account will be: "Is it possible to choose evil for evil's sake?" and "What is the motive of a morally wrong action?"

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading
CRN 24228 (Reilly) W 11:30-2:15

GERM 5001 (0) Graduate Reading in German
CRN 15446 (Gschwandtner) TF 11:30-12:45

Spring/Summer 2019

Spring 2019

ENGL 5226 (3) Langland's Piers Plowman and the Poetry of Social Justice in Late Medieval England
CRN 36126 (Wogan-Browne) T 2:30 - 5:15 p.m.
Chaucer’s great contemporary, William Langland, writes a different, equally brilliant and fascinating kind of verse, but is not harder to read than Chaucer. Langland’s dream-vision poem, Piers Plowman (composed, like Chaucer’s works, in late fourteenth-century London) treats many of the things Chaucer skirts or omits. “Piers Plowman!” is, famously, one of the rebel slogans from the 1381 uprising, and Langland’s accounts of social unrest, some forms of religious argument and conflict, policy and practices regarding poverty and his critique of social structures and experimentation with alternatives give us a different Middle Ages from Chaucer’s more court-centred writing. Langland also offers some challenging early visions of social justice that can often interrogate our own society’s priorities and assumptions. This course will put reading Piers Plowman, arguably the greatest single medieval English poem, at its center, while paying due attention to its context in other texts and in the poem’s surrounding world.

MVST 5102 (4) Theorizing Medieval Sound: Medieval Sonic Worlds
CRN 37169 (Albin) W 4 - 7 p.m.
In this interdisciplinary seminar, we read widely and listen actively to the texts, music, and objects of the European Middle Ages to find out just how closely we can come to encountering medieval sonic worlds. Using an eclectic array of primary, secondary, and theoretical works, we study medieval sound cultures and the production of sonorous meanings for medieval listeners in all their complexity. At the same time, we investigate how open-minded engagement with the sonorous Middle Ages can challenge us to rethink prevailing popular and scholarly attitudes towards the body, the senses, media, and the past.

HIST 5203 (4) Medieval Hagiography
CRN 35811 (Bruce) F 2:30 - 5 p.m.
This research seminar introduces students to the challenges and pitfalls of using saints' lives and other hagiographical writings (miracula, furta sacra, etc.) as sources for medieval history. It aims to familiarize students with competing historical approaches to these genres and to provide a practical guide to the scholarly resources necessary to exploit them as historical sources.

HIST 8110 (4) PSM: Church Law and Medieval Society
CRN 35808 (Mueller) R 5:30 - 8 p.m.
This course is the second part of a two-semester proseminar/seminar sequence inviting graduate students to formulate and conduct original research projects in the field of medieval church law. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

PHIL 5010 (3) Introduction to St. Thomas Aquinas
CRN 18395 (Davies) M 4 - 6 p.m.
This course will be a general introduction to Aquinas's philosophical thinking. We shall pay special attention to his philosophy of God. We shall also look at what he says about questions such as the scope of human knowledge, the nature of the human being, and the nature and significance of human action. As well as being expository, the course will consider the cogency of Aquinas's positions on various topics. It will also try to relate what Aquinas says to what other philosophers, especially modern and contemporary ones, have had to say. The course will not presuppose any previous knowledge of Aquinas on the part of students.

PHIL 5012 (3) Introduction to St. Augustine
CRN 18396 (Cullen) W 1 - 3 p.m.
At the age of nineteen a young man living in Roman north Africa discovered philosophy. The world has never been the same since. While the world of the late Roman Empire—a world known for its decadence and brutality—teetered on the brink of collapse all about him, this teenager gave himself wholeheartedly to the pursuit of wisdom; he developed into one of greatest philosophical geniuses of all time—a genius who did more to shape the thought and culture of the next millenium of history than perhaps any other single individual. This course is a survey of the philosophy of this singularly influential intellectual—Augustine of Hippo. The course will begin by examining the philosophical currents that shaped Augustine, above all, Neo-platonism. We will then enter into the details of Augustine’s life, from his tumultuous and lurid youth in the streets of Carthage to his deathbed where he lay dying while the barbarians were literally at the gates. The course will discuss his intellectual struggle with Gnostic Manicheanism and skepticism. The course will follow Augustine on his inner journey into the depths of the human soul. In addition to his teachings on being and truth, the course will examine his philosophy of education and his history-making intervention in the centuries-long battle between Socrates and the Sophists. The last section of the course will focus on Augustine’s ethical and political ideas. Particular attention will be given to those seminal doctrines that have had a pervasive influence, such as his teachings on society, the political order, war, and his philosophy of history.

THEO 5230 (3) Advanced Greek: Church, State, and Power
CRN 27209 (Peppard) R 9 - 11:30 a.m.
This graduate seminar situates early Christian discourse in a variety of Greek rhetorical contexts. If we call part of a Christian text “philosophical” or a “hymn,” for example, what would an ancient audience have expected from contemporaneous philosophy or hymns in Greek? By studying excerpts from the genres of biography, law, philosophy, hymn, and novel, along with selected orations, students will gain a richer sense of the rhetorical context into which early Christian discourse was proclaimed.

THEO 6367 (3) Byzantine Christianity: History and Theology
CRN 36127 (Demacopoulos) M 2:30 - 5 p.m.
The graduate-level survey course introduces students to the theological ideas and historical transitions that captivated the minds of Eastern Christians from the 8th to the 15th centuries. Through a careful reading of primary sources (in English translation) and the scholarly debates about those sources, we will explore the Iconoclastic controversies, the expansion of Christianity to the Slavs, the experience of Christians living under Islamic authority, and a host of issues related to rupture between Eastern and Western Christianity. In most circumstances, successful completion of this course authorizes doctoral students in Theology to teach the undergraduate cognate course.

GERM 5002 (0) Graduate Reading in German II
CRN 17960 (Hafner) TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Summer 2019

LATN 5090 (0) Latin for Reading, Summer Session I (Rose Hill)
CRN 10292 (McGowan) MW 1:00-4:00pm

LATN 5083 (3) Ecclesiastical Latin, Summer Session II (Rose Hill)
CRN 10305 (McGowan) MW 1:00-4:00pm

Fall 2018

MVST 5070 (4) Manuscript Culture
Call #36780 (Rowe) W 11:30 a.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Introduction to the principles and materials in the study of medieval illuminated manuscripts as well as the historiography of the field. Issues examined include technical aspects of production of the illustrated book, contexts for making and use (monastic, urban, courtly), and iconographic and stylistic variables. Further topics include the history of collecting illuminated manuscripts and the availability of the works through digital media. Students will do hands-on work with primary sources at Fordham’s Rare Books and Manuscripts collection and will visit exhibitions and talk to experts at galleries and museums in New York, including the Morgan Library and Museum. Final projects will be tailored to the students’ primary research areas and expertise. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 6234 (3) Race, Religion, and Monstrosity in Medieval Literature
Call #36226 (Yeager) R 2:30 - 5 p.m.

The medieval taste for the exotic has introduced many audiences to a range of monstrous beings, from ferocious giants and dog-headed men to the peace-loving sciapod. Medieval studies of monstrosity have often been linked solely to the pre-modern understanding of the exotic East, and have been viewed as attempts to theorize the different human “races” found there. Moreover, crusading further complicated the discourses of monstrosity in the perception of non-Christian religious Other who was perceived, as Debra Higgs-Strickland put it, “as ugly as sin.” Yet, the medieval language of monstrosity was not always limited to travel narrative, nor to the pejorative, for it was used to describe heroes, saints, even the Christian deity in far more familiar contexts than many would imagine. In this course, we will examine the discourse of monstrosity as a complex critical lens through which pre-modern writers asked important questions of race, religion, civic virtue, and human morality. In our study, we will read selections from Pliny, Augustine, and others before moving through a range of texts, including the Beowulf manuscript, medieval drama, romance, and Mandeville’s account.

ENGL 5180 (3) Anthologizing Poetry in the Middle Ages
Call #36597 (O’Donnell) M 2:30 - 5 p.m.

This course surveys important medieval poetry collections in several different languages in order to explore the shifting relationships between poetic expression, verse collection, and book production during the Middle Ages. How and why did medieval people collect poetry, and how should manuscript context guide our interpretation of individual works? Some tuition in Middle English will be provided; translations will be available for literature in other languages.

HIST 6077 (4) The Angevin Empire
Call# 36436 (Paul) T 2:30 - 5 p.m.

From the middle of the twelfth until the first quarter of the thirteenth centuries, one dynasty, the house of Anjou, were the effective rulers of an enormous agglomeration of kingdoms and principalities which stretched from the North Sea to the Mediterranean and encompassed England, large parts of Ireland, Wales, and nearly half of the territory which today constitutes modern France. Following a wave of renewed scholarly interest in the politics and culture of this period, this class will explore this short-lived but powerful domain, its lands, peoples, and rulers. Among other topics, we will explore the dynamic lives and cultures of the court, strategies, and technologies of governance, politics and their diplomacy, the extraordinary phenomenon of the Third Crusade, and the legacies of the Angevin dominion in England and France after the conquest of Normandy 1204.

HIST 7110 (4) PSM: Church Law and Medieval Society
Call# 36342 (Mueller) R 5:30 - 8 p.m.

The course consists of a two-semester pro-seminar/seminar sequence inviting graduate students to formulate and pursue original research projects in the field of medieval church law. Suitable study questions may address a wide range of issues, including legal theory and judicial practice, interactions between the law and penance or medicine, or contemporary uses and perceptions of ‘justice’. The pro-seminar is devoted to becoming familiar with the bibliography and tools for first-hand investigations. It also assists in defining an appropriate research topic. The seminar in the spring of 2019 will provide a forum for the presentation, discussion, and refinement of each participant's scholarly work, resulting in a 30 to 50-page essay.

THEO 5070 (3) Elementary Coptic
(Fiano) F 9 - 11:30 a.m.

This course is part of a two-semester introduction to Coptic, the latest stage of the Egyptian language. The first semester will introduce the script, cover grammatical foundations, and expose students from early on to the reading of texts. The second semester will be mostly spent reading Coptic literature, but some time will be devoted to select special topics in Coptic language and culture. The two semesters can be taken independently from one another.

THEO 5401 (3) Introduction to Islam
Call# 36429 (Kueny) M 5:15 - 7:45 p.m.

This course provides a basic introduction to Islam through close readings of the Qur’an as well as theological, philosophical, legal, exegetical and literary writings. Special focus will be given to comparative themes, such as God, revelation, prophecy, reason, ritual, and ethics. Attention will be paid to sources and pedagogical concerns involved in the creation of undergraduate courses on Islamic topics and themes.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading
Call# 24288 (TBA) W 11:30 a.m. - 2:15 p.m.

GERM 5090 (0) German for Reading I
Call# 15446 (Ebner) TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Spring/Summer 2018

Spring 2018

MVST 5300 (4) Occitania: Language and Power                                               
Call# 34027 
(O’Donnell, Paul) F 2:00- 5:00
This team-taught interdisciplinary course introduces students to the cultural world of a medieval south: Occitania, a region defined by language stretching from the foothills of the Alps to the pathways across the Pyrenees and from the Mediterranean almost to the Loire. Students will study the Old Occitan language and its manifestations in documentary writing, historical narrative, and the poetry of the troubadours from the eleventh to the thirteenth centuries. In order to best understand the context for this literature, course topics will include urban and rural communities, gender and power, the Albigensian crusade and its aftermath, and the rise of vernacular book production.

ENGL 5210: Introduction to Old Norse Language and Literature                
Call# 32381 (Chase) R 2:30-5:00

The course will involve both an introduction to Old Norse language, and the study of representative works from a variety of genres: historical prose, saga prose, and hagiography, as well as eddic poetry (wisdom, myth, legend) and the encomiastic poetry of the skalds. Readings will be partly in Old Norse, partly in translation. We will attempt to situate the texts in their medieval cultural context (analogues in English, French, German, and Latin literature), and we will spend some time on Old Norse palaeography and codicology so that students can better appreciate their material context. There is no prerequisite for the course and no prior knowledge is assumed, but students should be aware that the course will involve language study.

HIST 8150: Seminar: Medieval England                                                               
Call# 32591 (Kowaleski) T 2:30-5:00

Students continue to work on the research project they defined in the Proseminar to this course. They also learn to design and use a computer database that includes data gathered in the course of research on the final paper, participate in seminars to improve their academic writing and public speaking skills, and familiarize themselves with professional standards for writing a scholarly article, giving a talk at an academic conference, and writing an academic curriculum vita. They complete the seminar by giving a 20-minute conference paper on their research project and writing a thesis-length original research paper that could be published as a scholarly article.

PHIL 5010: Introduction to St Thomas Aquinas                                                  
Call# 18395 (Davies) M 4:00-6:00

Aquinas is often, and rightly, taken to be a theologian who assumes that certain truths have to be revealed to us by God since we lack the ability to demonstrate them. But he also engaged in what is commonly called ‘natural theology’ — i.e. philosophical argumentation aiming to prove that there is some knowledge of God to be attained by human reason. In this course we shall be looking at Aquinas’s natural theology, chiefly as presented in his Summa Theologiae, but also as we find it in his Summa Contra Gentiles. We shall see how Aquinas approaches the notion of natural theology in general. We shall then see how Aquinas argues for certain conclusions concerning the existence and nature of God. Given the importance of natural theology for Aquinas’s philosophy as a whole, and given the fact that Aquinas draws on metaphysical notions scattered throughout his writings, the course will provide a serious introduction to Aquinas’s thinking in general. This will be primarily a lecture course, but will include class discussions. Partly to stimulate them, numerous comparisons and contrasts will be made between what Aquinas has to say and what other philosophers have argued since early modern times. The course will relate Aquinas’s natural theology to that of other thinkers, including contemporary analytical ones. This course can satisfy for either the medieval requirement or for the contemporary analytical one. This course will not require a knowledge of Latin, and it will not presuppose any previous familiarity with the thinking of Aquinas or that of any other medieval philosopher.

PHIL 5012: Introduction to St Augustine                                                               
Call# 18396 (Pini) W 12:00-2:00

This course will provide a survey of some of the key aspects of St. Augustine’s thought. Topics will include faith and reason; divine ideas; the theology of the Holy Trinity; mind; skepticism; divine foreknowledge and predestination and human free will; the problem of evil; original sin and divine grace; happiness; human history and society. These topics will be approached by studying relevant sections from Augustine’s major works. Ideally, each class will consist of an introductory lecture (first hour) and discussion on the readings (second hour). This format may vary according to what the material requires and the needs of students. Students are expected to complete the readings in advance and take an active role in the discussion.

THEO 6426: St. Augustine                                                                                            
Call# 33462 
(Lienhard) M  2:30-5:00
Jaroslav Pelikan adapts Whitehead’s remark about philosophy’s being a series of footnotes to Plato and wonders whether western theology is a series of footnotes to Augustine.  This, at least, can be said: from the fifth century until the introduction of Aristotle into Europe, western theology was a conversation with Augustine. St. Augustine of Hippo (354-430) would be important to theology if he had written only On the Trinity, or only The City of God, or only the Confessions.  But he wrote all three, and more than 120 other books besides.  When the tradition honors him, however, it honors him as the doctor gratiae, the Doctor of Grace. The goal of this course is a critical understanding and appreciation of the life, writings, and thought of St. Augustine.  The means to this goal is a guided reading and analysis of some of his writings and, secondarily, of some modern books about him.  The following works will be read in their entirety: the ConfessionsOn Christian Doctrine, and On the Spirit and the Letter.  The class will also read To SimplicianI, selections from On the Trinity and the City of God, and passages from Augustine’s writings on the questions of original sin, free choice, grace, freedom, and predestination.  Requirements for the course are: extensive reading; insatiable curiosity; several short written assignments, class reports, a 20-page term paper, and a final examination.

THEO 5076: Syriac Language and Literature II   
Call# 33460 (Fiano) F 9:00-11:00

This course is part of a two-semester introduction to Syriac, a dialect belonging to the Aramaic language branch. The first semester will introduce the scripts, cover grammatical foundations, and expose students from early on to the reading of texts. The second semester will be mostly spent reading Syriac literature related to the students' specific interests, but some time will be devoted to select special topics in Syriac grammar. The two semesters can be taken independently.

GERM 5001 (0) Graduate Reading in German II                                                
Call# 17960 (TBA) TF 11:30-12:45

 

Summer 2018

MVST 5570 (4) Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders                 
(Mittman, Lindquist) Session I MW 9 - 1pm
This course examines the vital role played by monsters in medieval art and culture. The word “monster” evokes powerful visions of strange and unnatural creatures. Monsters and monstrosities possess a transformative power that makes them at once profoundly dangerous and utterly fascinating. More than mere figments of the imagination, monsters have played an important role throughout the history, and were central to medieval thought. The very act of visualizing monsters—giving shape to them in art and literature—constitutes an important step toward defining and therefore controlling the unknown. During the European Middle Ages, theologians accepted the supernatural character of monsters as part of a divine plan. Medieval scholars traced the meaning of the word “monster” to the Latin verbs “monstrare” (to show) and “monere” (to warn). As divine lessons, monsters provided testimony to God’s active intervention in the world. The ubiquity and variety of monstrosities in the art of the Middle Ages attest to their cultural importance and multifaceted nature. Readings will include primary sources (eg. Pliny, Isidore of Seville, Augustine of Hippo, The Book of Mandeville, The Wonders of the East, Bisclavret) and readings in monster theory and related approaches (eg. Jeffrey Cohen, Patricia MacCormack, Noël Carrol, Homi Bhabha). The course will run in conjunction with an exhibition of the same title at the Morgan Library & Museum, co-curated by Mittman and Professor Sherry Lindquist. The exhibition will feature sixty sumptuously illuminated manuscripts, as well as additional objects in other medieval media. The course will be divided into three overlapping sections, following the division of the exhibition. Some sessions will be conducted in the gallery, and the class will also visit other major collections (The Met, The Cloisters) and the conception, design, and implementation of the exhibition will be covered in the course.

MVST 8999 (1-4) Tutorial: Study Tour of Medieval Spain                           
(Myers)

One of the great medieval pilgrimage routes, the Camino de Santiago crosses northern Spain from the passes of the Pyrenees to Santiago de Compostela. This tutorial will consider the legends of the Camino, some of its many surviving monuments, and the modern revival of the pilgrimage. The bulk of the tutorial consists of walking for two weeks as a peregrino/a from Leon to Santiago de Compostela. This class will meet periodically at Fordham before the walk to discuss reading assignments and prepare. Depending on the student's interest, the final project could involve devising a syllabus for future teaching or focus on some element of the pilgrimage and its history in the form of a journal.

LATIN 5090 (0) Latin for Reading                                                                           
Call # 10148 (Staff) Session I, MW 1-4 PM 

Graduate course. This course is designed to offer graduate students a reading knowledge of Latin. No prior instruction in Latin is necessary. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor. The charge for this course is equivalent to one graduate credit in the Summer Session.

LATN 5093 (3) Ecclesiastical Latin                                                                         
Call # 10261 (McGowan) Session II, MW 1-4 PM 

Graduate course. Study of the grammatical structure, form, and vocabulary of Christian Latin, focusing on the Bible, the Church, and Medieval authors. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading - Taught at LC Campus                            
Call # TBA (Staff) Session I, TR 6-9 PM

Fall 2017

MVST 5077 (4) Editing Medieval Texts
Call# 34045 (Reilly) W 5:30 - 8 p.m.

This course explores the theory and practice of editing medieval texts. We will study how different types of edition influence our readings of texts, whether in literary criticism, historiography, theology, or other disciplines of medieval studies. Through practical exercises and a final editorial project, we will see how such editions get made and what choices underlie them. Our choices will be informed by reading both foundational and contemporary articles that argue for a particular rationale or editorial practice (Lachmannian, Best-Text, facsimile, documentary, versioning, etc.). Special attention will be given to editorial practice in the digital age.

ENGL 6224 (3) French of England: Texts and Literacies
Call # 33283 (Wogan-Browne) T 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.

French of England helps prepare graduates in medieval disciplines deploy the newly important multilingual paradigms for the study of medieval English and related cultures. Each French of England course explores a different selection from the rich and under-researched francophone corpus (c. 1000 literary texts and large bodies of documentary records) composed and/or circulating in medieval England and related regions from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries. French was a major regional and transnational language in England, used in literature, governance, administration, culture, trade, and the professions. Taking francophone literary and documentary culture into account changes our paradigms for English medieval literary history and prompts new thought about the relations between literature, literacy, and the entities we call ‘language’. Aiming to move as rapidly as possible from the pains of language-learning to the pleasures of reading text, the course combines a weekly linguistic practicum with a literary seminar and runs from 5.30 to 8.30pm on Tuesdays with a short refreshment break between the two parts. Previous experience of Old French is not required; basic reading or speaking of modern French is useful; experience with other languages is also sometimes enough of a help. If in doubt about whether your language experiences will be helpful, please email woganbrowne@fordham.edu

ENGL 6231 (3) Late Medieval Women
Call# 33284 (Erler) R 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

The course will study women as producers and consumers of literature, that is as writers and readers. Instead of examining women as subjects of literary representation, we will use non-literary disciplines--social history, bibliography, iconography--to recover elements of women's lives in order to understand their involvement with reading. Like much current medieval scholarship, the class will employ cultural perspectives in which literature, history, and visual materials illuminate each other.

HIST 6078 (4) The Crusader States: The Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem 1099-1291
Call# 33885 (Paul) W 2:30 - 5 p.m.

This course charts the social, political, and cultural history of the feudal principalities that were established by Latin Christians in the Eastern Mediterranean in the wake of the First Crusade. Students will be introduced to the narrative and documentary sources through which the history of the Latin Kingdom has been constructed, as well as the archaeology and art of the Levant during the period of Frankish occupation and settlement. In addition, we will engage with the major historiographical debates concerning the constitutional organization of the Latin kingdom, the relationship between the Frankish crusaders and the Muslim and eastern Christian populations over whom they ruled, and the “colonial” character of the Latin settlements.

HIST 7150 (4) Proseminar: Medieval England
Call# 33886 (Kowaleski) T 2:30 - 5 p.m.

This course focuses on the social, economic, and administrative history of England from the eleventh through fifteenth centuries. Special emphasis is placed upon: 1) how to identify and exploit primary sources (such as wills, cartularies, court rolls, account rolls,and chronicles, among others) relevant to your research interests; 2) how to use major historical collections (such as Rolls Series, VCH, Record Commissioners, Royal Historical Manuscripts Commission, the Ordnance Survey, Selden Society, and others); and 3) gaining an awareness of the regions and landscape of medieval England, as well as the contributions of archaeology and historical geography. Besides treating thematic issues such as the church and society, law and legal system, the growth of government and administration, maritime trade and industry in town and country, the weekly discussions will also consider the society and economy of the peasantry, townspeople, and the landowning elite.

THEO 5300 (3/4) History of Christianity I
Call# 33241 (Lienhard) M 5:15 - 7:45 p.m.

The history of the doctrines and theology of Christianity from New Testament times to A.D. 1500. Topics treated are the canon of the Bible, the Trinity, the Person of Christ, grace and predestination, and the presence of Christ in the Eucharist. To accompany this study, books by some classic authors will be read: Jean Leclercq, Joseph Pieper, Etienne Gilson, and others, along with W. H. C. Frend's The Rise of Christianity.

THEO 6198: The Self in Early Christianity (3)
Call# 33244 (Dunning) W 9 - 11:30 a.m.

This course will explore various notions of the self in early and late ancient Christianity. We will begin by studying the broader philosophical context (as explored by thinkers such as Michel Foucault, Pierre Hadot, and Richard Sorabji) in which early Christians wrestled with various facets of what it means to be human. We will also investigate specific problems of theological anthropology that emerged in formative Christian thought at the intersection of broader late ancient ideas about biology, gender, embodiment, and cultural identity with specifically Christian notions such as scripture, incarnation, and resurrection.

THEO 5075: Syriac Language and Literature I
Call# 33249 (Fiano) F 9 -11:30 a.m.

This course is part of a two-semester introduction to Syriac, a dialect belonging to the Aramaic language branch. The first semester will introduce the scripts, cover grammatical foundations, and expose students from early on to the reading of texts. The second semester will be mostly spent reading Syriac literature, but some time will be devoted to select special topics in Syriac grammar. It is possible to take the first semester only.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading, Call# 24288 (TBA) W 8:30 - 11 a.m.

GERM 5001 (0) Graduate Reading in German I, Call# 15446 (Ebner) TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Spring/Summer 2017

Spring 2017

MVST 5100 (4) Cultures of Music and Sound in the Medieval World 
Call # 31362
 (Albin and Bianchi)  T 1:00  – 4:00 PM
Music and sound enriched every facet of pre-modern life, liturgy and ritual above all. This interdisciplinary seminar introduces medievalists – especially those without formal musical education – to the cultures of medieval and Renaissance music. It should enable students from any discipline to engage music and the sonic more fully in their own research and teaching. We will move chronologically across the millennium from Boethius to the Council of Trent; each session raises questions drawn from a smaller set of musical ideas and practices. We will devote equal attention to surveying the variety of approaches in contemporary scholarship, and to developing musical vocabularies and analytical tools. No prior musical knowledge required.

ENGL 6235 (3) The French of England: Language and Texts in a Multilingual Culture                
Call # 29793 (Wogan-Browne) R 4:00 – 7:00 PM

French of England helps prepare graduates in medieval disciplines deploy the newly important multilingual paradigms for the study of medieval English and related cultures.  It looks at the rich and still under-researched francophone corpus (c. 1000 literary texts and large bodies of documentary records) composed and/or circulating in medieval England and related regions from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries. French was a major regional and transregional language in England, used in literature, governance, administration, culture, trade, and the professions.  Following francophone texts also takes us into geopolitical realities beyond the idea of nation- for example into texts that are simultaneously texts of England and texts of the Angevin/Plantagenet empire, or of England and the Mediterranean.  Taking francophone literary and documentary culture into account changes our paradigms for medieval literary history and prompts new thought about the relations between literature, literacy, and language.  Aiming to move as rapidly as possible from the pains of language-learning to the pleasures of reading text, the course combines a weekly linguistic practicum with a literary seminar. Previous experience of Old French is not required; basic reading or speaking of modern French is useful; experience with other languages is also sometimes enough of a help. If in doubt about whether your language experiences will be helpful, or if you have any other questions, please e-mail woganbrowne@fordham.edu (For those who took French of England in 2015 and who wish to pursue it further, this course will offer few overlaps and mostly different texts from those you have already met). 

HIST 6133 (4) Medieval Religious Institutions                        
Call # 30193 (Müller) M 5:30 – 8:00 PM

In modern usage, the term 'religious' refers to everything having to do with religion.  Instead, the medieval Latin religiosus was employed rather narrowly to denote matters concerning the regulated (monastic) life.  The English expression 'institution' is again quite vague and has no single medieval equivalent.  It applies equally to inanimate and abstract entities, to territorial and personal status, and to procedures, whether defined legally or by custom.  The seminar will adopt the current understanding of 'religious institutions' in the broadest sense and apply it to various phenomena of medieval social and ecclesiastical history.  Basic administrative units of the Western Church such as bishoprics, the practice of priestly ordination, and clerical status obtained institutional definition as early as in late Antiquity.  Other institutions did not acquire shape until the twelfth-century systematization of canon law, including papal monarchy, the college of cardinals, canonical elections, and women's 'religious' movements.  The course will examine some of these institutions, their juridical and spiritual identities, strategies of self-representation, and major institutional trends and conflicts.

HIST 8056 (4) SEM: Medieval Political Cultures                      
Call # 30192 (Paul) W 5:30 – 8:00 PM

In the Spring semester component of the seminar sequence, students work on final projects based on topics identified in the Fall. These projects are intended to be sustained, original research papers of publishable quality. Class meetings will be devoted to honing research, writing, and presentation skills. All aspects of the writing process will be discussed, and students will have opportunities to read and critique each other’s' writing. The course will conclude with a mini-conference allowing students to present their work before an audience of other scholars.

PHIL 5010 (3) Introduction to St. Thomas             
Call # 18395 (Davies) M 4:00 – 6:00 PM

This course will be a general introduction to Aquinas's philosophical thinking. We shall pay special attention to his philosophy of God. We shall also turn to what he says about questions such as the scope of human knowledge, the nature of the human being, and the nature and significance of human action. As well as being expository, the course will consider the cogency of Aquinas's position on various topics. It will also try to relate what Aquinas says to what other philosophers, especially modern philosophers, have had to say. The course will not presuppose any previous detailed knowledge of Aquinas on the part of students.

PHIL 5012 (3) Introduction to St. Augustine                               
Call # 18396 (Cullen) R 1:30
– 3:30 PM
At the age of nineteen a young man living in Roman north Africa discovered philosophy.  The world has never been the same since.  While the world of the late Roman Empire—a world known for its decadence and brutality—teetered on the brink of collapse all about him, this teenager gave himself wholeheartedly to the pursuit of wisdom; he developed into one of greatest philosophical geniuses of all time—a genius who did more to shape the thought and culture of the next millennium of history than perhaps any other single individual.  This course is a survey of the philosophy of this singularly influential intellectual—Augustine of Hippo. The course will begin by discussing the philosophical currents that shaped Augustine, especially Neo-platonism, before moving on to Augustine’s life, which students will trace, from his tumultuous and lurid youth in the streets of Carthage to his deathbed where he lay dying while the barbarians were literally at the gates.  The course will discuss his intellectual struggle with Gnostic Manicheanism and skepticism.  The course will follow Augustine on his inner journey into the depths of the human soul.  In addition to his teachings on being and truth, the course will examine his philosophy of education and his history-making intervention in the centuries-long battle between Socrates and the Sophists. The last section of the course will focus on Augustine’s ethical and political ideas.  Particular attention will be given to those seminal doctrines that have had a pervasive influence, such as his teachings on history, society, and the political order. 

THEO 6194 (3) History, Theory, and Christianity                     
Call # 29764 (Dunning)  W 9:00 – 11:30AM

This course will provide a thorough introduction to recent developments in historiography and critical theory in light of the so-called "linguistic turn." It will also explore the methodological relevance of these theoretical shifts for the study of pre-modern Christianity/historical theology.

THEO 6490 (3) Christianity and Violence
Call # 29765 (Demacopoulos) T 4:00 – 6:30 PM

This course explores the often ambivalent relationship between Christianity and violence in the pre-modern world. Readings include a broad range of primary sources such as martyr acts, liturgical hymns, canon law, and Crusader chronicles as well as influential scholarly assessments of the history of Christianity and violence.

GERM 5002 (0) Graduate Reading in German II                         
Call # 17960 (Hafner) TF 11:30 AM – 12:45 PM

ITAL 5090 (0) Italian for Reading                                                  
Call # 24288   

Summer 2017

MVST 5570 (4) Medieval Crusades
Call # 10159 (Paul) Session I, TR 4 - 7 p.m.

This course adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the medieval crusades in the Levant, southern France, Iberia, and the Baltic, with attention paid to the Islamic and Byzantine perspectives. The sources to be discussed include chronicles, charters, sermons, literary texts, songs, and hagiography, as well as architectural and artistic monuments and objects. Among the themes to be treated are crusader motivations, crusades and memory, European “colonization,” women and family in crusading society, crusading liturgies, the military orders, and diplomacy.

MVST 8999 (1-4) Tutorial: Study Tour of Medieval Spain
Call # 24286 (Myers) (TBA)

One of the great medieval pilgrimage routes, the Camino de Santiago crosses northern Spain from the passes of the Pyrenees to Santiago de Compostela. This tutorial will consider the legends of the Camino, some of its many surviving monuments, and the modern revival of the pilgrimage. The bulk of the tutorial consists of walking for two weeks as a peregrino/a from Leon to Santiago de Compostela. This class will meet periodically at Fordham before the walk to discuss reading assignments and prepare. Depending on the student's interest, the final project could involve devising a syllabus for future teaching or focus on some element of the pilgrimage and its history in the form of a journal.

LATN 5093 (3) Ecclesiastical Latin, Call # 10261 (McGowan) Session II, MW 6 - 9 p.m.

Study of the grammatical structure, form and vocabulary of Church Latin, focusing on the Bible, the Church Fathers, and medieval thinkers.

LATIN 5090 (0) Latin for Reading, Call # 10148 (McGowan) Session I, TR 6 - 9 p.m.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading - Taught at LC Campus, Call# 10160 (A. Clark) Session I, TR 6 - 9 p.m. 

SPAN 5090 (0) Spanish for Reading - Taught at RH Campus, Call# 10161 (Méndez-Clark) Session I, TR 1- 4 p.m.

Fall 2016

MVST 5070 (4) Manuscript Culture
Call #30314 (Hafner) F 2 - 5 p.m.

This course will examine manuscript culture from the third through the fifteenth centuries, with particular attention to questions of textual transmission and illuminated adornment. Issues examined will include: the principles, materials, and study of medieval manuscripts and primary documents; the problems of evaluation of the cultural contexts of their production and use; manuscript illumination; the resources of codicology and palaeography; the preparation and evaluation of modern editions; the assessment of readership and patronage; philology and the materialism of the Middle Ages; or the development of libraries. The course will include visits to local manuscript libraries, such as Special Collections at Walsh Library, Rare Books and Manuscripts at Columbia University, the Rare Book Collection of the NY Public Library, and the Morgan Library. Students will have the opportunity to do hands-on work with primary sources. Their final projects will be tailored to their research areas and expertise and must be based on the study of an original manuscript.

ENGL 6106 (3) Medieval Communities and Modern Thought
Call #31130 (O'Donnell) T 12:30 - 3 p.m.

This interdisciplinary course will consider the roles played by modern images and ideas of the medieval past in the formulation of modern ideas of community, nation, subjectivity, and habitus. Course readings will include modern theoretical texts and medieval source material (mostly in translation). What can a more vital understanding of the medieval past offer modern thinking about community and belonging? The course will be appropriate for medieval specialists as well as for anyone interested in the intersections of social history, social theory, and literature.

ENGL 6235 (3) Medieval Travel Narrative
Call #29896 (Yeager) R 2:30 - 5 p.m.

In a project which brought together the greatest minds and resources of the western world, the crusading movements inspired subsequent generations of Western European poets and chroniclers to create some of the most beautiful and, at times, most brutal romances and histories ever written. This course will focus on a range of traditions, including the romance, Richard, Coeur de Lion in light of contemporary chronicler, Roger of Howden's, Chronica. Even Josephus' Jewish War is barely recognizable in the fourteenth-century Siege of Jerusalem. Pilgrim and merchant narratives, from Egeria to Margery Kempe, and Mandeville to Marco Polo, will provide a contrast to romance and chronicle modes. We will be especially concerned with the ways in which chivalric quest came to influence the romance and chronicle genres. This course is designed to contextualize travel within the medieval world as we read and discuss those travel narratives with a specific set of concerns: salvation, conquest, and conversion.

HIST 6152 (4) Medieval Women and Family
Call #30306 (Kowaleski) T 4 - 6:30 p.m.

This course surveys recent historiography on the roles and status of women in medieval society, as well as the structures and dynamics of medieval families. Among the debates to be explored are the effect on medieval society of the Christian Church's teachings on virginity, sex, and marriage, and the influence of geography (northern vs Mediterranean Europe), environment (village, town, and convent), and status (noble, bourgeois, or peasant) on the work, family role, and authority of women. Chronologically the course will range from the early Christian period to the Renaissance. Recent scholarly work on nuns, mystics, and beguines will be examined, and readings will also cover different approaches to the study of women and family, including the methodologies of literary scholars, demographers, feminists, and legal historians.

HIST 7056 (4) Proseminar: Medieval Political Cultures
Call #30307 (Paul) W 5 - 7:20 p.m.

This course, the first part of a two-semester proseminar/seminar sequence will introduce students to recent debates and different approaches to cultures of power and political processes in western Europe in the central middle ages. Among the many topics we might consider are: lordship, status and the sources of political authority; the origins and significance of consultative assemblies; the rituals and rhetoric of courtliness and persuasion; the relationship between rulership and sanctity; and the rise of accountability. Through in-class presentations and discussions, students will become familiar with a wide range of source material, from diplomatic and documentary collections to historical narratives and courtly literature. With this solid foundation in the current historiography and available research tools, students will be expected to identity a suitable topic for a sustained research project. Completing this project will be the objective of the seminar course offered in Spring 2017.

PHIL 5001 (3) Introduction to Plato
Call #11387 (Johnson) T 2 - 4 p.m.

Study of Plato's developing thought, starting with the materials he inherited from poetic and philosophical forerunners, and analyzing how his original ethical-political interests compelled him to confront epistemological, metaphysical, and theological concerns. Course will focus mainly, but not exclusively, on early and middle dialogues.

PHIL 5009 (3) Introduction to Aristotle
Call #11393 (Tress) M 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.

An introduction to the thought of Aristotle through the study of the De Anima and the Metaphysics.

PHIL 7080 (3) Medieval Views on Cognition and Certainty
Call #29878 (Pini) M 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Several later medieval authors inquired about the limits of what can be known and the extent to which we can say we are certain of something. Are our cognitive powers sufficient to put us in a state in which we cannot possibly be wrong? Or do we need some external, i.e. superhuman, help to reach that state? And is a state of absolute certainty something we should be willing to achieve at all? What is the scope of our cognitive powers? What are their limits? And, for that matter, what does it mean to be certain of something? In this course, we will consider these and related questions in the writings of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century authors such as John Duns Scotus, Henry of Ghent, Nicholas of Autrecourt and others. While dealing with the legacy of Aristotle and Augustine and exploring the extent to which superhuman beings can deceive us, those authors laid the premises of the early modern debate on certainty and skepticism. The course will be based on the close reading of texts in English translation and the detailed consideration of the arguments contained in those texts.

THEO 6465 (3) Asceticism and Monasticism
Call #29903 (Lienhard) M 2:30 - 5 p.m.

The course begins with a consideration of asceticism in Judaism, among pagans, and in early Christianity, including dedicated virginity, and then treats the history of the monastic movement up to the Carolingian era and Benedict of Aniane. The principal work of the course is reading and analyzing, in English translation, pertinent documents from this period, from four categories: lives of monks (Antony, Pachomius, Martin, Benedict), collected lives (Lausiac History, History of the Monks in Egypt, and others), rules (Basil, Augustine, the Master, Benedict), and theory (Evagrius of Pontus, John Cassian).

THEO 6445 (3) Affect, Emotion, and Religious Experience
Call #29901 (Davis) W 9 - 11:30 a.m.

This course will explore the diverse engagements with affect and emotion across the humanities and social sciences in terms of their potential to open up new approaches for thinking theologically and historically about embodied religious experience. The first part of the course will situate the articulation of religious experience as the foundation for the modern study of religion as a human science within a broader philosophical and theological genealogy of affect, emotions, passions, and moral sentiments. The second part of the course will take up recent work in affect theory, psychoanalysis, and the history of emotions. On the one hand, there has been an effort among some historians and philosophers, drawing on cognitive science, to argue for the “intelligence” of emotions as rational, judicative functions with which individuals and groups manage subjective and social life. On the other hand, much recent work in feminist and queer theory, disability studies, critical race theory, and political theory takes as its point of departure precisely those dynamics of affect—what Brian Massumi calls a “prepersonal intensity”—that are irreducible to rationality, subjectivity, and signification, either via Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s reading of Spinoza, or through psychoanalytic approaches to grief, trauma, and melancholia. The final section of the course will think critically and constructively about how these diverse theoretical approaches might inform our own theological and historical approaches to religious experience.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading
Call #24288 (Instructor TBA) W 8:30 - 11 a.m.

An intensive study of basic French grammar and shorter readings in French.

GERM 5001 (0) Graduate Reading in German I
Call #15446 (Hafner) TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Spring/Summer 2016

Spring 2016

MVST 5905 (4) Medieval Pilgrimage
Call#28764 (Gyug, Yeager) R 2:30 - 5 p.m.

"Medieval Pilgrimage" is a new graduate seminar, team taught by Dr. Richard Gyug (History) and Dr. Suzanne Yeager (English). Over the course of the semester we will focus on a variety of medieval pilgrims and their destinations, ranging from the well-known shrine at Compostela to those places mainly frequented by local audiences such as the shrine of St. Foy. In this seminar, we conceptualize pilgrimage broadly, entertaining a variety of aims for travel, and also considering the pilgrimage form as a purely conceptual exercise (seen, for instance, inThe Travels of Sir John Mandeville) as well as those with more practical aims - such as the pilgrim's guide to Jerusalem supplied by William Wey. We will also consider relics and the process of shrine-making and promotion intranslation accounts. Through the work of medieval as well as contemporary scholars of pilgrimage, we will consider pilgrimage anthropologically as well as a component of a variety of religious and political ideals of the Middle Ages. Readings include Egeria's Letter, Guibert of Nogent's treatise on relics, promotional materials of the crusading era,The Marvels of Rome, the Liber Sancti Jacobi, the Mandeville writer, the Voyage of St. Brendan, Edith and Victor Turners' twentieth-century work on pilgrimage, and many others.

MVST 6209 (4) Themes in Preconquest Literature
Call#27331 (Chase) T 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

This course is an advanced-level seminar on the language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England. We will read (in Old English) a variety of texts from the period, including poetry, homilies, saints' lives, and chronicles. Substantial attention will also be given to Anglo-Saxon palaeography and relevant critical literature, with the aim of providing students with the resources needed for the scholarly study of Old English. Prior knowledge of Old English is expected.

ENGL 6215: (3) Medieval British Historical Writing
Call#27483 (O'Donnell) F 2:30 - 5 p.m.

History-writing was fundamental to medieval and early-modern literary sensibilities, but in its relation to truth, genre, and identity, medieval history differs dramatically from contemporary understandings of the discipline of history. This course will introduce you to the major historiographical thinkers and practitioners of the English Middle Ages and include selections from Gildas, Bede, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Matthew Paris, and the Middle English Brut.

HIST 5202 (4) Medieval Interfaith Relations
Call#28270 (Novikoff) T 5:30 - 8 p.m.

Interfaith relations are today a valuable and potentially urgent category of historical analysis. This seminar explores the relations among Christians, Muslims, and Jews across Europe and the Mediterranean from early medieval papal policy to rise of the Ottoman Turks, with a particular focus on religious, intellectual, and cultural instances of interfaith conflict and coexistence. Attention will especially be given to historiographical models that have attempted to understand how such relations are useful to the modern world.

HIST 5553 (4) Book History: Texts, Media, Communication
Call#27257 (Rigogne) W 5:30 - 8 p.m.

This course explores the history of media and communication in general, as well as textual scholarship. Topics range across time periods and continents, with particular focus on the medieval and early modern transitions, as well as on more recent "media revolutions." It will introduce graduate students to key works, concepts and methodologies that analyze how communication media of all sorts (from manuscripts to printed books, newspapers and images, from songs and rumors to audiovisual and digital media) have been a driving force in history, and have shaped all historical research. We will study texts and methods drawn from a wide variety of historical fields, as well as from sociology, anthropology, philosophy, literary criticism, art history, bibliography and media studies, all of which provide historians with powerful insights and indispensable tools and skills.

HIST 8110 (4) SEM: Church Law and Medieval Society
Call#27255 (Müller) W 2:30 - 5:30 p.m.

The course forms the second part of a two-semester pro-seminar/seminar sequence and invites graduate students to pursue original research projects in the field of medieval church law. Their inquiries may address a wide range of issues, such as legal theory, judicial practice, and the medieval uses and perceptions of canonical justice. The previous pro-seminar has provided an introduction to the field and helped formulate appropriate study agendas. This seminar will offer a forum for the presentation, discussion, and refinement of each participant's scholarly work-in-progress. The ultimate goal will be to submit a fully annotated 30 to 40-page essay which successfully analyzes select source material.

PHIL 5010 (3) Intro to Aquinas
Call#18395 (Davies) W 7 - 9 p.m.

This course will be a general introduction to Aquinas's philosophical thinking. We shall pay special attention to his philosophy of God. We shall also turn to what he says about questions such as the scope of human knowledge, the nature of the human being, and the nature and significance of human action. As well as being expository, the course will consider the cogency of Aquinas's position on various topics. It will also try to relate what Aquinas says to what other philosophers, especially modern philosophers, have had to say. The course will not presuppose any previous detailed knowledge of Aquinas on the part of students.

PHIL 5012 (3) Intro to Augustine
Call#5012 (Pini) W 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

This course will provide a survey of some of the key aspects of St. Augustine's thought. Topics will include faith and reason; divine ideas; the theology of the Holy Trinity; mind; skepticism; divine foreknowledge and predestination and human free will; the problem of evil; original sin and divine grace; happiness; human history and society. These topics will be approached by studying relevant sections from Augustine's major works. Ideally, each class will consist of an introductory lecture (first hour) and discussion on the readings (second hour). This format may vary according to what the material requires and the needs of students. Students are expected to complete the readings in advance and take an active role in the discussion.

PHIL 7042: (3) Buridan on the Soul
Call#27519 (Klima) T 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.

This course will be based on the recently completed edition and translation of Buridan's "Questions on Aristotle's On the Soul" and its companion volume comprising a number of essays that place Buridan's thought in its own historical context, while always reflecting on what we can learn from this outstanding thinker on the borderline of late-scholastic and early modern thought about our own contemporary problems in the philosophy of mind.

LATIN 6521: (4) Latin Paleography
Call#27196 (Clark) R 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

"From Script to Print": A study of the development of Latin handwriting from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Includes a study of the manuscript as book (codicology) and as cultural artifact. Some consideration of textual transmission and critical editing. There will be hands-on practice in reading the various scripts. Weekly transcriptions, some outside reading, a final examination, and a final palaeographical project are course requirements. The final project will involve transcribing and identifying an original manuscript leaf from the Fordham collection, although advanced students, with specific needs, may, with permission, develop their own final palaeographical projects.

GERM 5002: (0) Graduate Reading in German II
Call#17960 (Hafner) TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

ITAL 5090: (0) Italian for Reading
Call#25070 (TBD) W 8:30 - 11 a.m.

Summer 2016

MVST 5201 (4) The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century (Novikoff)
Session I, MW 3 - 6 p.m.

This graduate seminar explores the religious, intellectual, literary, and cultural contours of the "long" twelfth century, with equal weight given to the diversity of medieval sources that survive and to modern historiographical interpretations. The class will include visits to the Cloisters museum and to the Morgan library.

MVST 8999 (1-4) Tutorial: Study Tour of Medieval Spain (Myers)

One of the great medieval pilgrimage routes, the Camino de Santiago crosses northern Spain from the passes of the Pyrenees to Santiago de Compostela. This study-tour will consider the legends of the Camino, some of its many surviving monuments, and the modern revival of the pilgrimage by walking for two weeks with the peregrinos/-as from Leon to Santiago de Compostela. This class will meet periodically at Fordham before the walk to discuss reading assignments and prepare. A journal is required at the end of the course. Fees and travel costs not included.

LATN 5090 (0) Latin for Reading
Call #10072 (Sogno) Session I, TR 6 - 9 p.m.

LATN 5093 (3) Ecclesiastical Latin
Call #10073 (J. Clark) Session II, MW 6 - 9 p.m.

Study of the grammatical structure, form and vocabulary of Church Latin, focusing on the Bible, the Church Fathers, and medieval thinkers.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading
Call #10220 (Taught at Lincoln Center) (A. Clark) Session I, TR 6 - 9 p.m.

SPAN 5090 (0) Spanish for Reading
Call#10221 (Méndez-Clark) Session I, TR 1 - 4 p.m.

Fall 2015

MVST 5077 (4) Editing Medieval Texts (Reilly)
Call#27616, R 5:30 - 8 p.m.
This course explores the theory and practice of editing medieval texts. We will study how different types of edition influence our readings of texts, whether in literary criticism, historiography, theology, or other disciplines of medieval studies. Through practical exercises and a final editorial project, we will see how such editions get made and what choices underlie them. Our choices will be informed by reading both foundational and contemporary articles that argue for a particular rationale or editorial practice (Lachmannian, Best-Text, facsimile, documentary, versioning, etc.). Special attention will be given to editorial practice in the digital age.

ENGL 6224 (3) The French of England: Texts and Literacies in a Multilingual Culture (Wogan-Browne)
Call#29066, T 4 - 6:30 p.m.
French of England helps prepare graduates in medieval disciplines deploy the newly important multilingual paradigms for the study of medieval English and related cultures. It looks at the rich and still under-researched francophone corpus (c. 1000 literary texts and large bodies of documentary records) composed and/or circulating in medieval England and related regions from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries. French was a major regional and transnational language in England, used in literature, governance, administration, culture, trade, and the professions. Taking francophone literary and documentary culture into account changes our paradigms for English medieval literary history and prompts new thought about the relations between literature, literacy, and language. Aiming to move as rapidly as possible from the pains of language-learning to the pleasures of reading text, the course combines a weekly linguistic practicum with a literary seminar and runs from 4pm to 7.00 pm on Tuesdays. Previous experience of Old French is not required; basic reading or speaking of modern French is useful; experience with other languages is also sometimes enough of a help.

ENGL 6231 (3) Late Medieval Women: Reading, Texts, Audiences (Erler)
Call#27332, M 2:30 - 5 p.m.

The course will study women as producers and consumers of literature, that is as writers and readers. Instead of examining women as subjects of literary representation, we will use non-literary disciplines--social history, bibliography, iconography--to recover elements of women's lives in order to understand their involvement with reading. Like much current medieval scholarship, the class will employ cultural perspectives in which literature, history, and visual materials illuminate each other.

HIST 6078 (4) The Crusader States: Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem 1099-1291 (Paul)
Call#27124, W 5:30 - 8 p.m.
This course charts the social, political, and cultural history of the feudal principalities that were established by Latin Christians in the Eastern Mediterranean in the wake of the First Crusade. Students will be introduced to the narrative and documentary sources through which the history of the Latin Kingdom has been constructed, as well as the archaeology and art of the Levant during the period of Frankish occupation and settlement. In addition, we will engage with the major historiographical debates concerning the constitutional organization of the Latin kingdom, the relationship between the Frankish crusaders and the Muslim and eastern Christian populations over whom they ruled, and the "colonial" character of the Latin settlements.

HIST 7110 (4) PSM: Church Law and Medieval Society (Mueller)
Call#27619, M 5:30 - 8 p.m.
The course will consist of a two-semester pro-seminar/seminar sequence inviting graduate students to formulate and pursue original research projects in the field of medieval church law. Possible study questions may address a wide range of issues, including legal theory and judicial practice, contemporary uses and perceptions of 'canonical justice'. The pro-seminar will be devoted to becoming familiar with the bibliography and tools available for original investigations into the subject. It will also assist students in defining their own research topics. The seminar in the spring of 2016 will provide a forum for the presentation, discussion, and refinement of each participant's scholarly work, which should eventually result in a 30 to 50-page essay.

PHIL 7039 (3) Aquinas's Philosophy of God (Davies)
Call#27183, W 7 - 9 p.m.

Aquinas is often, and rightly, taken to be a theologian who assumes that certain truths have to be revealed to us by God since we lack the ability to demonstrate them. But he also engaged in what is commonly called 'natural theology' - i.e. philosophical argumentation aiming to prove that there is some knowledge of God to be attained by human reason. In this course we shall be looking at Aquinas's natural theology, chiefly as presented in his Summa Theologiae, but also as we find it in his Summa Contra Gentiles. We shall see how Aquinas approaches the notion of natural theology in general. We shall then see how Aquinas argues for certain conclusions concerning the existence and nature of God. Given the importance of natural theology for Aquinas's philosophy as a whole, and given the fact that Aquinas draws on metaphysical notions scattered throughout his writings, the course will provide a serious introduction to Aquinas's thinking in general. This will be primarily a lecture course, but will include class discussions. Partly to stimulate them, numerous comparisons and contrasts will be made between what Aquinas has to say and what other philosophers have argued since early modern times. The course will relate Aquinas's natural theology to that of other thinkers, including contemporary analytical ones. This course can satisfy for either the medieval requirement or for the contemporary analytical one. This course will not require a knowledge of Latin, and it will not presuppose any previous familiarity with the thinking of Aquinas or that of any other medieval philosopher.

THEO 5300 (3/4) History of Christianity I (Lienhard)
Call#27136, W 5 - 7:30 p.m.

The history of the doctrines and theology of Christianity from New Testament times to A.D. 1500. Topics treated are the canon of the Bible, the Trinity, the Person of Christ, grace and predestination, and the presence of Christ in the Eucharist. To accompany this study, books by some classic authors will be read: Jean Leclercq, Joseph Pieper, Etienne Gilson, and others, along with W. H. C. Frend's The Rise of Christianity.

THEO 6305 (3) Introduction to Rabbinic Literature (Gribetz)
Call#27133, T 1 - 3:30 p.m.

In this course, students will explore the vast corpus of rabbinic literature and the historical, intellectual, religious, social, legal and political circumstances in which rabbinic Judaism developed in Palestine and Babylonia between the first and seventh centuries C.E. Students will gain experience reading different genres of rabbinic texts; become familiar with cutting-edge scholarship in the field; experiment with various methodologies in the study of late antiquity; and learn about a formative period in Jewish history. The course will cover a range of topics, including biblical exegesis, the development of tradition, the relationship between law and literature, inter-religious tolerance and conflict, scholasticism, women/gender/sexuality, interactions between lay and religious authorities, the development of ritual, the transmission of oral and written texts, manuscripts, and reception history. The course is designed to train graduate students in a range of disciplines and fields - theology, history, literature, law, classics, medieval studies, women and gender - to be able to use rabbinic sources and methodologies developed in the field of rabbinics in their own research. The texts will be taught in translation, with optional additional sessions for those interested in reading in the original Hebrew and Aramaic.

THEO 6463 (3) From Lollards to Luther (Hornbeck)
Call#27137, R 9 - 11:30 a.m.
The period between the outbreak of the Black Death and the emergence of Martin Luther, Huldrych Zwingli, John Calvin, and others as leaders of a new "Reformation" was a period of great diversity and contestation in Western Christianity. In this course, we will explore the theology, spirituality, and ecclesio-political ramifications of several reform "movements" in the later middle ages. Our focus will fall primarily on the Lollard or Wycliffite controversies of late medieval England, on fifteenth-century phenomena like conciliarism and the Modern-Day Devout, and on the early Lutheran Reformation, but broader themes (women, preaching, soteriology, academic life, heresy and inquisition) will be treated throughout the semester.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading (TBA)
Call#24288, W 8:30 - 11 a.m.

GERM 5001 (0) Graduate Reading in German I (Hafner)
Call#15446, TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Spring/Summer 2015

Spring 2015

MVST 5078 (4) Meditation, Contemplation, and the Spiritual Senses
Call #25015 (Albin and Davis); W 5 - 7:30 p.m.

The late Middle Ages saw an astonishing proliferation of texts, practices, and styles of devotion seeking to draw human beings closer to God through the body. New emphasis on Christ's humanity and Aristotelian natural philosophy prompted the rediscovery of the five corporeal senses and their cognitive processes in devotional literature. In this course, we will examine the languages, knowledge, desires, and anxieties surrounding the senses in a diverse corpus of texts, probing them for their theological import as much as for their literary design. Major authors: Aristotle, Augustine, Origen, Hugh of St. Victor, Bonaventure, Richard Rolle, Chaucer, Margery Kempe, Meditations Vitae Christi.

ENGL 5261 (3) Sir Thomas Malory: Political, Religious, and Literary Cultures of the Fifteenth Century
Call #25016 (Wogan-Browne); T 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Malorys vast Morte Darthur and the wide multilingual reading that went into it is both object of study and the gateway into the troubled fifteenth century in this course. After relative critical neglect, the fifteenth century is now increasingly studied, often as part of rethinking early modern and late medieval periods. Clerical literary production of religious devotion and controversy, and interest in medieval neo-classicism and early modern humanism as an area of book history have been two of the main drivers of renewed attention. Malory is best known as the writer of one of the most enduring and most loved Arthurian works in English, but this course seeks to take a fresh look at Morte Darthur by not making Arthurian literature its framing concern. Instead, the course looks at Morte Darthur as a work of secular culture composed within a period of richly various literary production amidst political and ideological crisis. Malorys representation of political stability and governance, of conquest and other internal and foreign relations, treason law, and chivalry investments in Eucharistic theology will be some of the issues explored in this wider context, alongside questions of manuscript-print interrelations, the valence of secular and sacred chivalric discourses, and the challenges posed by Malorys powerful and sometimes puzzling work to various conceptions of literary form. Reception, both in terms of the audiences for Malorys text and modern critical paradigms for Morte Darthur will also inform these explorations. No prerequisites (Malorys French sources can be read in translation on this course).

HIST 6076 (4) Noble Culture and Society
Call #25885 (Paul); M 5 - 7:30 p.m.

The world of High Medieval Europe was politically, economically, and culturally dominated by a new kind of aristocracy, one whose special status was based on a combination of landholding, military dominance, exclusive bloodlines, and elaborate performances. The group who we designate as "nobility" shaped the medieval political landscape, just as often acting as the avowed enemies of the centralizing monarchies as they were its agents and the beneficiaries of the royal policies that enshrined their status and privileges in law. The nobility were also the primary patrons and consumers of courtly culture. They wrote law and poetry and spoke often of the laws of love. They were the nurturers of religious reform and dissent: some were crusaders, some heretics, and some both. This course will explore the recent scholarship on the nobility. Among other topics, we will explore the arguments surrounding the supposed feudal and familial crises that created the noble class, the meaning and exercise of violence by the aristocracy, the social function of courtliness, the relationship between chivalry and religious belief, and the response of the nobility to the threat of rising centralized government and the emergence of a wealthy merchant class in the later middle ages. We will read poetry, family histories, devotional texts, and knightly biography and consider art objects, landscape, and architecture.

HIST 8070 (4) Medieval Intellectual Cultures
Call #26848 (Novikoff); R 5:30 - 8 p.m.

This course is a continuation of the pro-seminar from the previous semester. The course takes a broad approach to medieval intellectual history, focusing not just on the texts and ideas that were central to medieval intellectual life but also on the cultural conditions that enabled scholarship and creativity to flourish. Students enrolled in the seminar will under ordinary circumstance have taken the first part of the seminar/pro-seminar and be expected to work on a research paper of substantial size. Seminars will be principally devoted to discussing additional historiographical and methodological issues that arise from the study of medieval intellectual and cultural history.

PHIL 5010 (3) Introduction to St. Thomas Aquinas
Call #18395 (Klima); T 11 a.m.- 1 p.m.

This course will be a general introduction to Aquinas' philosophical thinking. We shall pay special attention to his philosophy of God. We shall also turn to what he says about questions such as the scope of human knowledge, the nature of the human being, and the nature and significance of human action. As well as being expository, the course will consider the cogency of Aquinas' position on various topics. It will also try to relate what Aquinas says to what other philosophers, especially modern philosophers, have had to say. The course will not presuppose any previous detailed knowledge of Aquinas on the part of students.

PHIL 5012 (3) Introduction to St. Augustine
Call #18396 (Cullen); R 2:30 - 4:30 p.m.

At the age of nineteen a young man living in Roman north Africa discovered philosophy. The world has never been the same since. While the world of the late Roman Empire a world known for its decadence and brutality teetered on the brink of collapse all about him, this teenager gave himself wholeheartedly to the pursuit of wisdom; he developed into one of greatest philosophical geniuses of all time a genius who did more to shape the thought and culture of the next millennium of history than perhaps any other single individual. This course is a survey of the philosophy of this singularly influential intellectual Augustine of Hippo. The course will begin by discussing Augustine's life, from his tumultuous and lurid youth in the streets of Carthage to his deathbed where he lay dying while the barbarians were literally at the gates. The course will discuss his intellectual struggle with Gnostic Manicheanism and skepticism. Attention will be given to the philosophical currents that shaped Augustine, especially Neo-platonism. The course will follow Augustine on his inner journey into the depths of the human soul. In addition to his teachings on being and truth, the course will examine his philosophy of education and his history-making intervention in the centuries-long battle between Socrates and the Sophists. The last section of the course will focus on Augustines ethical and political ideas. Particular attention will be given to those seminal doctrines that have had a pervasive influence, such as his teachings on society, the political order, war, and his philosophy of history.

PHIL 6460 (3) Intentionality
Call #24988 (Klima); F 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.

This course explores the key concept of intentionality both in its medieval and in its modern varieties, as it functions in various medieval and modern theories of cognition and mental representation.

THEO 6194 (3) History, Theory and Pre-Modern Christianity
Call #24981 (Dunning); W 11:45 a.m. - 2:15 p.m.

This course will provide a thorough introduction to recent developments in historiography and critical theory in light of the so-called "linguistic turn." It will also explore the methodological relevance of these theoretical shifts for the study of pre-modern Christianity/historical theology.

THEO 6425 (3) Augustine in Context
Call #24977(M. Tilley) M 9 - 11:30 a.m.

This course investigates the life and writings of Augustine of Hippo in the context of late antiquity including philosophical and religious influences upon him as well as the controversies and archeological remains of his ministry

THEO 6444 (3) Medieval Modernisms
Call #24980 (Moore); T 4 - 6:30 p.m.

In twentieth-century Europe, an astonishing range of intellectuals were animated and energized by the study of pre modern and early modern Christianity. For theologians, historians, philosophers, and literary figures, Christian medieval and patristic sources were galvanizing forces of transformation, and harbingers of ethical, theological, and political renewal. This course investigates the various appropriations of medieval and ancient Christianity from the Catholic nouvelle theologie movement (Henri de Lubac, Yves Congar, MD Chenu, and Jean Danielou in particular), literature (Charles Peguy), philosophy, and historiography (Michel de Certeau), along with secondary works by Amy Hollywood and others.

Ital 5090 (0) Italian for Reading
Call#25070 (Long) W 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

GERM 5002 (0) Graduate Reading in German II
Call #17960 (Hafner); TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Summer 2015

MVST 5200 (4) Medieval Iberia
(Novikoff) Session I; TR 4 - 7 p.m.
This course examines and evaluates the interaction among the three religious cultures of medieval Iberia: Christian, Muslim, and Jewish. Readings and discussion will cover the successive historical periods of medieval Iberia (ca. 600-1500), but a major focus of the class will be a holistic approach to intellectual traditions and cultural interactions among the three groups. To this end, a substantial amount of attention will be devoted to considering the architectural, poetic, musical, and polemical interactions that shaped the countries we now call Spain and Portugal. This class will also take advantage of New York's exceptional museum and library collections.

HIST 8999 (4) Tutorial: Study Tour of Medieval Spain
(Myers) (TBA)

One of the great medieval pilgrimage routes, the Camino de Santiago crosses northern Spain from the passes of the Pyrenees to Santiago de Compostela. This study-tour will consider the legends of the Camino, some of its many surviving monuments, and the modern revival of the pilgrimage by walking for two weeks with the peregrinos/-as from Leon to Santiago de Compostela. This class will meet periodically at Fordham before the walk to discuss reading assignments and prepare. A journal is required at the end of the course. Fees and travel costs not included.

LATIN 5090 (0) Latin for Reading
Call #10072 (Sogno) Session I; TR 6 - 9 p.m.

LATN 5093 (3) Ecclesiastical Latin
Call #10073 (Clark) Session II; MW 6 - 9 p.m.

Study of the grammatical structure, form and vocabulary of Church Latin, focusing on the Bible, the Church Fathers, and medieval thinkers.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading- Taught at LC Campus
Call #10251 (Latour) Session I; TR 6 - 9 p.m.

SPAN 5090 (0) Spanish for Reading - Taught at LC Campus
Call #10250 (Lenis) Session II; TR 6 - 9 p.m.

Fall 2014

MVST 5070 (4) Manuscript Culture
Call #24287 (Hafner) F; 1 - 3:30 p.m.

This course will examine manuscript culture from the third through the fifteenth centuries, with particular attention to questions of textual transmission and illuminated adornment. Issues examined will include: the principles, materials, and study of medieval manuscripts and primary documents; the problems of evaluation of the cultural contexts of their production and use; manuscript illumination; the resources of codicology and palaeography; the preparation and evaluation of modern editions; the assessment of readership and patronage; philology and the materialism of the Middle Ages; or the development of libraries. The course will include visits to local manuscript libraries, such as Special Collections at Walsh Library, Rare Books and Manuscripts at Columbia University, the Rare Book Collection of the NY Public Library, and the Morgan Library. Students will have the opportunity to do hands-on work with primary sources. Their final projects will be tailored to their research areas and expertise and must be based on the study of an original manuscript.

ENGL 5208 (3) The English Language 1154-1776
Call #23921 (Chase); M 2:30 - 5 p.m.

This course will deal with the linguistics and sociolinguistics of Middle English and Early Modern English. The beginning date, 1154, is the year of the last entry in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and the year Henry II, the first Angevin king, acceded to the throne. It is as good a date as any to mark the demise of Old English and the beginning of the Middle English period. 1776, the year of the American Declaration of Independence, marks another turning point, when Early Modern English began to become the English(es) of the present day. This course, which should be of special interest to students of medieval and early modern literature, will examine the ways in which the language developed from the twelfth through the eighteenth centuries. Topics will include dialects and standardization, lexicon, grammar and syntax, phonological change (The Great Vowel Shift), stress and prosody, palaeography and codicology of Middle English manuscripts, and early printing, all with an aim to better understanding and appreciating the literature of these periods.

ENGL 5264 (3) Chaucer
Call #24265 (Yeager); R 2:30 - 5 p.m.

This course is an introduction to Geoffrey Chaucers poetry as well as to trends in medieval literary criticism. By reading Chaucers The Canterbury Tales, the Troilus, and selections from his mid-length and shorter poems, we will touch on some of the concerns that have animated Chaucer studies: Chaucers representation of the social world, religion, gender, and the self. Any analysis of Chaucers writing implicitly or explicitly raises a question about the most responsible approach to texts that are now over 600 years old. Indeed, this question has remained constant since the beginning of Chaucer studies. We will, therefore, be very interested in what it has meant and what it means now to read Chaucer historically. Discussion will also be animated by our exploration of Chaucers continued dialogue with his sources. No prior knowledge of Middle English or medieval history is assumed; however, most of the primary readings will be offered in Chaucers highly accessible dialect of Middle English. The course aims to develop close reading and recitation skills in Middle English, as it raises students awareness of Chaucers status as a poet in a triglossic society. Because Chaucer is so commonly associated with a medievalists teaching expectations on the job market, we will also explore aspects of syllabus and undergraduate teaching design. It is recommended that those who are unfamiliar with this period look at Maurice Keens English Society in the Later Middle Ages or May McKisacks The Fourteenth Century before the class begins.

HIST 6153 (4) Medieval Society and Economy
Call #24653 (Kowaleksi); T 4 - 6:30 p.m.

This course explores major themes in the social and economic history of medieval Europe, including the impact of the barbarian migrations, technology and social change, agriculture and rural life, the commercial revolution, the Black Death, social revolts, craft guilds and the textile industry, and changing notions of poverty and charity, among other topics. The different methodological approaches to these issues will also be highlighted in examining not only schools of history (such as the Annales school, neo-Marxism, and prosopography) but also the contributions of other disciplinary approaches, including archaeology, demography, environmental science, historical geography, and numismatics.

HIST 7070 (4) PSM: Med Intellectual Cultures
Call #24925 (Novikoff); W 5 - 7:30 p.m.

This pro-seminar takes a broad approach to medieval intellectual history, focusing not just on the texts and ideas that were central to medieval intellectual life but also on the cultural conditions that enabled scholarship and creativity to flourish. Beginning with the late antique absorption of classical learning and the formation of a monastic tradition, the course will deal successively with the deep impact of the Augustinian tradition, the Carolingian renewal, the conflicts between Church and State that erupted during the investiture controversy, the classicizing tendencies and innovative ideas of the twelfth-century renaissance, the golden age of scholasticism and the medieval university, and the various crises of authority that reshaped Europe on the eve of the Reformation and before the invention of print. A particular concern of the class will be with the history of the liberal arts and the evolution of teaching practices.

PHIL 7076 (3) Metaphysical Themes in Duns Scotus
Call #23845 (Pini); M 5:30 - 7:30 p.m.

John Duns Scotus (1308) is commonly recognized as having made a major contribution to Western metaphysics, but because his works are quite technical, they are read only rarely by a limited number of specialists. In this course, students will study and discuss some key texts concerning topics such as being, substance, essence, and individuation. The course will devote much attention to historical context but the ultimate goal will be to assess Scotus's positions and arguments from a philosophical point of view.

THEO 6360 (3) Alexandrian Theology
Call #23854 (Lienhard); M 5:15 - 7:45 p.m.

This course will focus on reading and interpretation of selected writings of Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Athanasius, Didymus the Blind, and Cyril of Alexandria, against the background of the pagan and Jewish traditions of Alexandria.

THEO 6196 (3) Early Christian Ritual (3)
Call #23852 (Peppard); M 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.

This graduate seminar surveys the evidence for ritual practices in the first few centuries of Christianity. Through engagement with theoretical literature on ritual and identity formation, we will explore what can be known about early Christian practices and interrogate our means of knowing it. Much of the course will focus on the rituals of initiation and their diverse interpretations in ancient sources, but other topics will be covered as time allows. Prior study of early Christian history is recommended.

THEO 6367 (3) Byzantine Christianity: History and Theology
Call #23858 (Demacopoulos); W 11:45 a.m. - 2:15 p.m.

This graduate-level survey course introduces students to the theological ideas and historical transitions that captivated the minds of Eastern Christians from the 8th to the 15th centuries. Through a careful reading of primary sources (in English translation) and the scholarly debates about those sources, we will explore the Iconoclastic controversies, the expansion of Christianity to the Slavs, the experience of Christians living under Islamic authority, and a host of issues related to rupture between Eastern and Western Christianity. In most circumstances, successful completion of this course authorizes doctoral students in Theology to teach the undergraduate cognate course.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading
Call #24288 (TBA); W 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

GERM 5002 (0) Graduate Reading in German I
Call #15446 (Hafner); TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Spring/Summer 2014

Spring 2014

MVST 5078 (4) Medieval Books and Materials
Call #22183 (Gyug); W 5 - 7:30 p.m.

The handwritten sources of the medieval period, whether records, chronicles, treatises, Bibles, or many other genres and types, are fundamental materials for medieval studies. Using examples from a range of documentary and literary sources, the course will consider the purposes, preparation, transmission, and preservation of written sources from the period. The emphasis will be on how such materials can be used for medieval studies and the tools important for their study.

ENGL 6216 (3) Late Medieval Autobiography: T. Hoccleve, O. Bokenham, M. Kempe
Call #22514 (Erler); M 2:30 - 5 p.m.

Margery Kempe's Book is often called the first female autobiography in English but the writing of her fifteenth-century contemporaries Thomas Hoccleve, a London scribe and bureaucrat, and Osbern Bokenham, an East Anglian friar, also offer a personal voice. We will explore the social and theological context of each author as we read their work in Middle English.

ENGL 6250 (3) Postcolonial Middle Ages
Call #22515 (Yeager); R 2:30 - 5 p.m.

Postcolonial study has been a productive scholarly approach for decades. But the accuracy of the term, postcolonial, with reference to pre-modern literature, has been on ongoing subject of debate. According to accepted, critical definitions, postcolonial literatures are products of colonizing communities and previously colonized cultures, rising in the wake of periods of colonization; moreover, postcolonial study has been linked to modern European communities which formed global empires. These expectations and others have made the postcolonial Middle Ages appear controversial. In spite of these controversies, productive understanding of pre-modern culture has emerged from research under the postcolonial lens, encouraging the study of displaced cultures, and of minority and subjugated voices within the medieval period, the production and performance of identity, and the ways in which communities define, remember, and perpetuate themselves. This course will focus on medieval texts produced in England, France, and the Levant under changing pre-modern regimes, and will explore the varied literary responses to colonization, diaspora, and displacement that occurred long before the Age of Empire. Texts to be read in Middle English include the Croxton Play of the Sacrament, Geoffrey Chaucers Man of Laws Tale and Prioress's Tale, along with pre-modern work in translation, such as The Letter of Prester John, the Beauvais Play of Daniel, the Chanson de Roland, and Fulcher of Chartres history. These works offer complex views of alterity, conquest, place, space, and performance which are foundational in discussing how the Middle Ages can be viewed as postcolonial.

HIST 5201 (4) Twelfth Century Renaissance
Call #22485 (Novikoff); R 5:30 - 8 p.m.

This seminar examines the renaissance of the twelfth century from multiple historiographical angles: as a medieval "renaissance" in the sense famously popularized by Charles Homer Haskins in 1927, as a "reformation" or "European revolution" formulated by historians of religion in the later twentieth century, and as a "long twelfth century" preferred by cultural historians today. Readings of secondary and select primary sources will cover a wide range of ideas, institutions, and personalities associated with intellectual life (broadly conceived) from Anselm of Canterbury to the first universities. Participants will be invited in writing assignments and discussions to challenge older paradigms, introduce new ones, and consider alternate and cross-disciplinary approaches to studying this enduringly fascinating epoch in medieval civilization

HIST 8150 (4) Seminar: Medieval England
Call #22491 (Kowaleski); T 4 - 6:30 p.m.

Students continue to work on the research project they defined in the Proseminar to this course. They also learn to design and use a computer database that includes data gathered in the course of research on the final paper, participate in seminars to improve their academic writing and public speaking skills, and familiarize themselves with professional standards for writing a scholarly article, giving a talk at an academic conference, and writing an academic curriculum vitae. They complete the seminar by giving a 20-minute conference paper on their research project and writing a thesis-length original research paper that could be published as a scholarly article.

LATN 6521 (3) Latin Palaeography
Call #23011 (Clark); F 4 - 6 p.m.

From Script to Print: A study of the development of Latin handwriting from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Includes a study of the manuscript as book (codicology) and as cultural artifact. Some consideration of textual transmission and critical editing. There will be hands-on practice in reading the various scripts. Weekly transcriptions, some outside reading, a final examination, and a final palaeographical project are course requirements. The final project will involve transcribing and identifying an original manuscript leaf from the Fordham collection, although advanced students, with specific needs, may, with permission, develop their own final palaeographical projects.

PHIL 5010 (3) Introduction to St. Thomas Aquinas Call # 18395 (Davies) M 7 - 9 p.m.
This course will be a general introduction to Aquinas' philosophical thinking. We shall pay special attention to his philosophy of God. We shall also look at what he says about questions such as the scope of human knowledge, the nature of the human being, and the nature and significance of human action. As well as being expository, the course will consider the cogency of Aquinas' positions on various topics. It will also try to relate what Aquinas says to what other philosophers, especially modern and contemporary ones, have had to say. The course will not presuppose any previous knowledge of Aquinas on the part of the student.

PHIL 5012 (3) Introduction to St. Augustine
Call #18396 (Klima); F 2 - 5 p.m.

This course will provide a survey of some of the key aspects of St. Augustines thought. Topics will include faith and reason; divine ideas; the theology of the Holy Trinity; mind; skepticism; divine foreknowledge and predestination and human free will; the problem of evil; original sin and divine grace; happiness; human history and society. These topics will be approached by studying relevant sections from Augustines major works. Ideally, each class will consist of an introductory lecture (first hour) and discussion on the readings (second hour). This format may vary according to what the material requires and the needs of students. Students are expected to complete the readings in advance and take an active role in the discussion.

THEO 5300 (3) History of Christianity I
Call #22913 (Lienhard); M 5:15 - 7:45 p.m.

This course is meant to introduce students to the history of Christian doctrine and theology from the end of New Testament times to 1500. The course will run on two parallel tracks. One track will be lectures, which will treat three principal doctrines of Christian faith: the doctrine of the one God whose name is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; the doctrine of the person of Jesus the Christ, true God and true man; and the doctrine of the presence of Christ in the Eucharist. The second track, intended to enhance participants knowledge of the greatest theologians and movements of the period, will consist of reading eight relatively short books and reporting on them in writing.

THEO 6365 (3) Cappadocian Fathers
Call #22910 (Demacopoulos); M 9 - 11:30 a.m.

This course is designed to provide a thorough introduction to the writings, interaction, and significance of the Cappadocian fathers. Although we will cover a number of theological, literary, and scholarly themes, we will pay special attention to their writings (and the scholarly debates about their writings) on anthropology, gender, asceticism, philanthropy, and the Nicene cause. Special Note: PhD students working in late antiquity are strongly encouraged to take the corresponding course in Cappadocian Greek, which will be offered by Dr. Dunning later the same day. The two courses have been redeveloped to be taught in conjunction with one another.

THEO 6461 (3) Mystical Theology
Call #22917 (Davis) W 11:45 a.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Examines the influences of Neoplatonic philosophy and the writings of Pseudo-Dionysius on medieval Latin Christianity, with attention to both "negative" theological language and reflection on the paths to and modes of union with God. Modern deconstructive, psychoanalytic, and feminist approaches to mysticism will also be considered.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading
Call #23272 (Lynch) W 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

GERM 5002 (0) Graduate Reading in German II
Call #17960 (Ebner); TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Summer 2014

MVST 5570 (4) Medieval Crusades
(Paul) Session I, TR; 4 - 7 p.m.

This course adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the medieval crusades in the Levant, southern France, Iberia, and the Baltic, with attention paid to the Islamic and Byzantine perspectives. The sources to be discussed include chronicles, charters, sermons, literary texts, songs, and hagiography, as well as architectural and artistic monuments and objects. Among the themes to be treated are crusader motivations, crusades and memory, European colonization, women and family in crusading society, crusading liturgies, the military orders, and diplomacy.

HIST 8999 (4) Tutorial: Study Tour of Medieval Spain (Myers)
The tutorial will offer graduate students the opportunity to gain credit by walking the Camino de Santiago, the traditional pilgrimage route from France across Spain to Santiago de Compostela, the legendary burial site of St. James. For more information, contact W. David Myers at dmyers@fordham.edu.

LATIN 5090 (0) Latin for Reading
Call #10072 (Sogno) Session I; MW 6 - 9 p.m.

LATN 5093 (3) Ecclesiastical Latin
Call #10073 (Clark) Session II; MW 6 - 9 p.m.

Study of the grammatical structure, form and vocabulary of Church Latin, focusing on the Bible, the Church Fathers, and medieval thinkers.

SPAN 5090 (0) Spanish for Reading - Taught at LC Campus
Call #10250 (TBA) Session I; TR 6 - 9 p.m.

FREN 5090 (0) French for Reading- Taught at LC Campus
Call #10251 (Brandon) Session II; TR 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Fall 2013

MVST 5050 (4) World of Late Antiquity: History, Art, Culture
Call #20959 (McFadden and Sogno) W 5 - 7:30 p.m.

The legacy of Gibbons masterpiece "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" has exercised a great and lasting influence on the way in which the world of Late Antiquity is perceived and presented, but the work of Peter Brown and other scholars has offered a powerful alternative to the Gibbonian narrative of inevitable decline. The two opposing concepts of "crisis" and "transformation" now co-exist as interpretive frameworks in the flourishing field of Late Antiquity and continue to inspire thought-provoking studies about this fascinating and enigmatic period, which defies easy explanation. This course offers an introduction to the Late Antique world by surveying the History, Art, and Culture of the Roman Empire from the third to the sixth century. We shall analyze both primary sources and monuments and examine critically the secondary literature that studies them.

ENGL 6215 (3) Medieval British Historical Writing
Call # 21970 (O'Donnell) M 2:30 - 5 p.m.

History-writing was fundamental to medieval and early-modern literary sensibilities, but in its relation to truth, genre, and identity, medieval history differs dramatically from contemporary understandings of the discipline of history. This course will introduce you to the major historiographical thinkers and practitioners of the English Middle Ages and include selections from Gildas, Bede, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Matthew Paris, and the Middle English Brut.

ENGL 5216 (3) Three Medieval Embodiments
Call # 21963 (Albin) M 5:30 - 7 p.m.

In this course, we will explore three models of human embodiment (theological, medical and musical) available to the high and late English Middle Ages; we will examine how writers, doctors, artists, and musicians gave expression to those models, we will locate and interrogate the places they overlap, interweave, and fall apart; and we will challenge ourselves to imagine how they constituted alternative modes of embodied experience in the world. To reach these goals, we will cast a wide net and study diverse primary sources drawn from philosophy, medicine, theology, drama, poetry, music, and visual art alongside secondary sources in historical phenomenology, cultural studies, and performance theory. Major authors/texts include: Bernardus Silvestris (Cosmographia), Chaucer, Second Shepherds Play, Aristotle (De anima), the Trotula, Boethius (Consolatio philosophiae and De institutione musica). All readings in English or Middle English.

HIST 6078 (4) The Crusader States: The Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem 1099-1291
Call #22073 (Paul) R 5:30 - 8 p.m.

This course charts the social, political, and cultural history of the feudal principalities that were established by Latin Christians in the Eastern Mediterranean in the wake of the First Crusade. Students will be introduced to the narrative and documentary sources through which the history of the Latin Kingdom has been constructed, as well as the archaeology and art of the Levant during the period of Frankish occupation and settlement. In addition, we will engage with the major historiographical debates concerning the constitutional organization of the Latin kingdom, the relationship between the Frankish crusaders and the Muslim and eastern Christian populations over whom they ruled, and the colonial character of the Latin settlements.

HIST 7150 (4) Proseminar: Medieval England
Call #21564 (Kowaleski) T 4 - 6:30 p.m.

This is the first half of a year-long course that focuses on the social, economic, and administrative history of England from the eleventh through fifteenth centuries. Special emphasis is placed upon 1) how to identify and exploit a wide variety of primary sources (such as wills, cartularies, court rolls, account rolls, chronicles, among others); 2) how to use major historical collections (such as Rolls Series, VCH, Record Commissioners, Royal Historical Manuscripts Commission, the Ordnance Survey, Selden Society, and others); and 3) gaining an awareness of the regions and landscape of medieval England, as well as the contributions of historical geography. Besides treating thematic issues such as the church and society, law and legal system, the growth of government and administration, maritime trade and industry in town and country, the weekly discussions will also consider the society and economy of the peasantry, townspeople, and the landowning elite.

PHIL 7071 (3) Aquinas: Questions on God in Summa Theologiae
Call # 21140 (Davies) M 7 - 9 p.m.

An exposition and critical discussion of Summa Theologies, 1a, 1-26.

THEO 6350 (3) North African Christianity
Call # 21954 (M. Tilley) W 9 - 11:30 a.m.

Ancient Christians in North Africa developed more sophisticated theologies than their contemporaries in Rome. Terms for the Trinity and the sacramental character imprinted on the soul come from Africa, as does the saying "Outside the Church there is no salvation." This course introduces students to the physical and cultural environment of early Christian communities in North Africa and to the theologies Africans produced between the origins of African Christianity in the second century and the Middle Ages. Subjects include Tertullian, Cyprian, stories of martyrs and literature of the Donatist controversy (with Augustine). Some attention will be paid to archaeology and, if possible given the talents of the class, pseudo-Cyprianic literature.

THEO 6456 (3) Medieval Liturgy
Call #21510 (Baldovin) T 1 - 3 p.m.

A study of the written sources and architectural setting of liturgy in the West from the 6th century to the eve of the Reformation. Special attention will be given to the liturgy of the Eucharist in the Roman Rite, the liturgical calendar, and the Liturgy of the Hours.

Spring/Summer 2013

Spring 2013

MVST 5035 (4) Writing East: Outremer and Identity in the Middle Ages
Call # 20401 (Paul and Yeager) FMH 416 R 2:30 - 5 p.m.
As the stage for the central events of the Gospel narrative, the lands of the eastern shore of the Mediterranean long occupied a central place in the collective imagination of Latin western Europe. Over the course of the Middle Ages, however, increasingly frequent encounters resulting from trade, pilgrimage, and crusade not only enriched the European image of the East, but vastly enhanced the significance to how medieval Christians approached the Other. This course will trace the rise of a discourse of difference centered in what was called, in England and France, Outremer, the land beyond the sea. Together with medieval literary productions, histories, letters, and travel narratives, we will read works from the growing body of scholarship on this important topic.

ENGL 6239 (3) French of England III
Call # 20935 (Wogan-Browne) TBD T 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

This course studies the rich, under-researched corpus (c. 1000 texts) in the Frenches of medieval England. Coursework includes projects of translation/editing (for acquiring techniques of presenting and interpreting medieval texts). FOE I, II not necessarily required.

ENGL 6265 (3) Manuscript Into Print
Call # 20936 (Erler) TBD F 3:45 - 6:15 p.m.

The course will explore the transition from manuscript to print culture in England during the half-century from William Caxton's introduction of printing to the death of Henry VIII. It will ask about the cultural changes produced by printing, particularly in audiences, reading, and book ownership. Sample topics might include: what happens to medieval authors like Chaucer or Langland when they first appear in print? How do books of hours, the most popular book of the middle ages, negotiate the transition to print? Early reading will be done in Middle English.

HIST 6152 (4) Medieval Women and Family
Call # 20344 (Kowaleski) FMH 416 M 2:30 - 5 p.m.

This course surveys recent historiography on the roles and status of women in medieval society, as well as the structures and dynamics of medieval families. Among the debates to be explored are the effect on medieval society of the Christian Church's teachings on virginity, sex, and marriage, and the influence of geography (northern vs Mediterranean Europe), environment (village, town, and convent), and status (noble, bourgeois, or peasant) on the work, family role, and authority of women. Chronologically the course will range from the early Christian period to the Renaissance. Recent scholarly work on nuns, mystics, and beguines will be examined, and readings will also cover different approaches to the study of women and family, including the methodologies of literary scholars, demographers, feminists, and legal historians.

HIST 8025 (4) SEM: Medieval Religious Cultures
Call # 20347 (Gyug) TBD W 5 - 7:30 p.m.

Participants will build on the reading and topics from HIST 7025 (Proseminar: Medieval Religious Cultures) to prepare research papers based on sources and debates in the study of medieval religious cultures. Weekly readings will be selected by the participants from materials for their papers; later in the semester, they will present drafts of their own papers, and prepare critiques of others.

PHIL 5010 (3) Introduction to St. Thomas Aquinas
Call #18395 (Davies) Collins PO M 7 - 9 p.m.

This course will be a general introduction to Aquinas' philosophical thinking. We shall pay special attention to his philosophy of God. We shall also look at what he says about questions such as the scope of human knowledge, the nature of the human being, and the nature and significance of human action. As well as being expository, the course will consider the cogency of Aquinas' positions on various topics. It will also try to relate what Aquinas says to what other philosophers, especially modern and contemporary ones, have had to say. The course will not presuppose any previous knowledge of Aquinas on the part of student.

PHIL 5012 (3) Introduction to St. Augustine
Call # 18396 (Cullen) Collins PO T 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.

This course will provide a survey of some of the key aspects of St. Augustine's thought. Topics will include faith and reason; divine ideas; the theology of the Holy Trinity; mind; skepticism; divine foreknowledge and predestination and human free will; the problem of evil; original sin and divine grace; happiness; human history and society. These topics will be approached by studying relevant sections from Augustines major works.
Ideally, each class will consist of an introductory lecture (first hour) and discussion on the readings (second hour). This format may vary according to what the material requires and the needs of students. Students are expected to complete the readings in advance and take an active role in the discussion.

THEO 6444 (3) Medieval Modernisms
Call # 20579 (Moore) TBD T 4 - 6:30 p.m.

In twentieth-century Europe, the study of pre-modern and early modern Christianity energized an astonishing range of intellectuals, across the ideological and disciplinary spectrums. For theologians, historians, philosophers, and literary figures, Christian medieval and patristic sources were galvanizing forces of transformation, and harbingers of ethical, theological, and political renewal. This course investigates the various appropriations of medieval and ancient Christianity from la nouvelle theologie movement (Henri de Lubac, M.D. Chenu, and Jean Danilou in particular), the Catholic literary revival (Charles Peguy, Georges Bernanos), philosophy, (Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, and Julia Kristeva), and historiography (Michel de Certeau), along with secondary works by Amy Hollywood and others.

THEO 6464 (3) From Lollards to Luther
Call # 20776 (Hornbeck) Duane 140 R 9 - 11:30 a.m.

The period between the outbreak of the Black Death and the emergence of Martin Luther, Huldrych Zwingli, John Calvin, and others as leaders of a new Reformation was a period of great diversity and contestation in Western Christianity. In this course, we will explore the theology, spirituality, and ecclesio-political ramifications of several reform movements in the later middle ages. Our focus will fall primarily on the lollard or Wycliffite controversies of late medieval England, on fifteenth-century phenomena like conciliarism and the Modern-Day Devout, and on the early Lutheran Reformation, but broader themes (women, preaching, soteriology, academic life, heresy and inquisition) will be treated throughout the semester.

THEO 6466 (3) Hagiography
Call # 20583 (Tilley) Duane 140 W 9:00-11:30

This course surveys methods for researching and writing about as well as evaluating the religious functions of stories of holy people. The course begins with a look at contemporary saint-making and then surveys classic works on hagiographic methods. After these explorations the course studies examples primarily from late antiquity and the Middle Ages, applying the methods of the first part of the course. Requirements include book reports, seminar leadership, a mid-term paper using primary sources and illustrating hagiographical method on a person not canonized (yet?), and a final paper in the students own field of interest. Students in history, fine arts, literature, theology, etc. are welcome.

GERM 5002-R02 (0) Graduate Reading in German
Call # 17960 (Hafner) TBD TF 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Summer 2013

MVST 6700 (4) Medieval Scholasticism
(Harkins) 1st session , T 4 - 6:30 p.m.

This interdisciplinary graduate course will provide an introduction to the history, theology, and philosophy of the Scholastic movement in the High Middle Ages. Topics to be considered include: the economic, social, political religious, and educational transitions that together constitute the renaissance of the twelfth century; the rise of open urban schools and the development of the university; and characteristic modes of thought and discourse in scholastic theology and philosophy. Thinkers to be examined include Anselm of Canturbury, Hugh and Richard of St. Victor, Peter Abelard, the school of Laon, Peter Lombard, Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham.

MVST 8999 (4) The Knights of the Round Table
in London (Hafner) 1st session

This tutorial course is linked with a Medieval Studies undergrad elective offered at Fordham's London campus, Heythrop College. The course looks for the traces of King Arthur and his Knights in modern-day London and its environs. Reading the foundational texts of Arthurian literature right where it happened, students will be able to go to the sites and see the artifacts as they occur in the readings. Students will study excerpts from the early annals and chronicles that laid the foundation for Arthur's fame in history, and it will follow the exploits of some of the most prominent members of Arthur's circle as they were depicted in medieval literature: Sir Gawain, Sir Perceval, Sir Tristrem, and Merlin the magician. The course will go on excursions to Winchester to have a look at King Arthur's original Round Table; as well as to Stonehenge and Canterbury. In London, participants will visit Westminster Abbey, the Tower, museums holding Arthurian artifacts, and the British Library, which has many manuscripts of the texts that will be read. Housing, insurance, a local travel card, cell phone, and excursions cost $2600; students also must pay for their own food and airfare.

SPAN 5090(0) Spanish for Reading
Call #10176 (TBD) Dealy 110 1st session, TWR 6 - 9 p.m.

LATIN 5090 (0) Latin for Reading
(Sogno) LC Campus 1st session, MW 6 - 9 p.m.

FREN 5090(0) French for Reading
Call #10786 (TBD) (TBA) 2nd session, TR 6 - 9 p.m.

LATN 5093 (3) Ecclesiastical Latin
(Clark) 2nd session, MW 6 - 9 p.m.

Study of the grammatical structure, form, and vocabulary of Christian Latin, focusing on the Bible, the Church Fathers, and medieval authors. Prerequisite: LATIN 5090: Latin for Reading, or equivalent.

Fall 2012

MVST 5070 (4) Manuscript Culture
Call # 18077 (Hafner) F 4:00-6:30

This course will examine manuscript culture from the third through the fifteenth centuries, with particular attention to questions of textual transmission and illuminated adornment. Issues examined will include: the principles, materials, and study of medieval manuscripts and primary documents; the problems of evaluation of the cultural contexts of their production and use; manuscript illumination; the resources of codicology and palaeography; the preparation and evaluation of modern editions; the assessment of readership and patronage; philology and the materialism of the Middle Ages; or the development of libraries. The course will include visits to local manuscript libraries, such as Special Collections at Walsh Library, Rare Books and Manuscripts at Columbia University, the Rare Book Collection of the NY Public Library, and the Morgan Library. Students will have the opportunity to do hands-on work with primary sources. Their final projects will be tailored to their research areas and expertise and must be based on the study of an original manuscript.

ENGL 5211 (3) Intro to Old English
Call # 19286 (Chase) T 3:45-6:15

This course will introduce students to Old English (Anglo-Saxon) language and literature, as well as palaeography and codicology of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts.

ENGL 6323 (3) European Writing and England in the 12th Century
Call # 19439 (O'Donnell) R 3:45-6:15

This course has two objectives: First, it uses English writing between 1050 and 1250 to consider the history of European literature more generally. It looks to the complex and multilingual background of individual works produced in England, including histories, debate poems, romances, works of spiritual instruction, and lyric poetry. How does literature help us understand the profound changes in twelfth-century Northwest Europe? Second, it provides students with the background they need in Middle English language and literature. Translations will be offered for readings in another language, such as French, Latin, Welsh, or Occitan, as well as individual translation tutorials for those who want them.

HIST 6077 (4) The Angevin Empire
Call # 19226 (Paul) W 5:15-7:45

From the Middle of the twelfth until the first quarter of the thirteenth centuries, one dynasty, the house of Anjou, were the effective rulers of an enormous agglomeration of kingdoms and principalities which stretched from the North Sea to the Mediterranean and encompassed England, large parts of Ireland, Wales, and nearly half of the territory which today constitutes modern France.