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Actions Against Bias

Action Against Bias

Our community is not isolated from the larger context of the ongoing national struggle against bias in its many forms. While we cannot always keep these repugnant events from occurring in our midst, we are committed to excellent education, training, and response to incidents of bias, bias crimes and hate crimes on campus. The University has worked over many years to continuously add to its array of resources, protocols and policies and to assure that response is sensitive, caring, and transparent. Our response will be ever-changing and improving, tailored to the incident, the changing culture and developments in student affairs practice, but strives to uphold the mission and values of our University, which call each of us to welcome and respect one another.

University Policies and Procedures

Bias-Related Incidents and/or Hate Crimes Policy: The University's policy regarding bias-related incidents and/or hate crimes is included in the Student Handbook and disseminated to the entire community at the beginning of each semester. For students, the policy is enforced through the student conduct process with all bias-related incidents and/or hate crimes policy violations handled by the Dean of Students and the Department of Public Safety. http://www.fordham.edu/info/21684/university_regulations/6566/bias-related_incidents_andor_hate_crimes

Bias/Hate Crimes Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ): A document answering frequently asked questions related to bias/hate crimes and how to report these incidents is available on the Student Affairs website and disseminated to the entire community at the beginning of each semester.www.fordham.edu/bias

Bias Incident Resource Group (BIRG): The Bias Incident Resource Group is comprised of administrators within the division of student affairs at Fordham University. Consistent with Fordham's mission and commitment to diversity, the purpose of the group is to promote an environment of care, inclusion, respect and moral reflection. Following a bias related incident, BIRG engages and empowers all members of the community through mutual education, support, and shared dialogue.http://www.fordham.edu/info/24936/biashate_crimes_faq/7896/bias_incident_resource_group

Confidential Online Reporting System: A confidential online reporting system was created on the my.fordham.edu portal for Fordham community members to report non-emergency incidents. http://www.fordham.edu/info/23846/caring_for_students/4088/confidential_non-emergency_online_reporting_guidelines

Internal Bias Response Protocol: Student Affairs' bias response protocol was developed to integrate and coordinate the work of the multiple Student Affairs departments and programs that respond to bias/hate crime incidents. This protocol includes the convening of the University's Emergency Management Team to assure that clear and accurate information is shared and coordinated among all areas of the University.

Divisional Staff Hiring, Training and Orientation

Staff Hiring: The Division of Student Affairs is committed to a hiring process that seeks to recruit and hire a talented and diverse pool of candidates for positions at all levels of the Division and in all departments.

Undergraduate Staff Hiring: after intentional efforts at recruiting at each campus, nearly 46% of the RAs at Rose Hill and almost 60% of the RAs at Lincoln Center are people of color.
At Lincoln Center, 10.8% of RAs are Latinx and 18.9% are Black. At Rose Hill, 20.6% of RAs are Latinx and 9.2% are Black. At Rose Hill, 54.6% of the RAs are women; that percentage is slightly higher at Lincoln Center.

New Staff Orientation Program: The New Staff Orientation is a one day program welcoming new staff in the Division of Student Affairs. The program consists of sessions focused on history: life of St. Ignatius, history of Jesuit education, and history of Fordham University and Fordham Athletics. There are also sessions about the structure of the division, our mission statement, and expectations. In addition, the program includes bias crime reporting and response training for all new staff and we also conduct annual refresher bias response training for all staff in September. New Staff Orientation occurs two to three times per year depending on the number of new staff hired during the course of the year.

Divisional Staff Training: Student Affairs requires all full-time and part-time staff to participate in a Divisional Training Day each semester. The topics for the training days vary, but are focused on issues related to our students and how staff in the Division of Student Affairs can best serve students. Diversity and inclusion has been the main topic for numerous mandatory Divisional Staff Training Days with significant focus during the 2020-2021 academic year on Anti-Racism:
Spring 2021: Jesuit Mission and Commitment to Anti-Racism
Fall 2020: Let’s Talk About It: Educating for Racial Justice (all staff completed implicit association tests)

Divisional Programs and Initiatives

Civility Core Programming Session (required for all new undergraduate students): In August 2014, a required core program was developed for all new freshmen centered on the concept of civility grounded in the Jesuit principles of cura personalis and men and women for others. The program is designed to include elements of Ignatian pedagogy of context, experience, reflection, action and evaluation. The 2020-2021 iterations of the program expanded on concepts connected to Anti-Racism, implicit bias, and systemic racism. The program includes interactive activities and a video conveying a unified campus message about civility, respect, expectations and resources. Video link:http://digital.library.fordham.edu/cdm/ref/collection/VIDEO/id/695

Diversity Assessment in Student Affairs Department Assessment Presentations: All departments in Student Affairs are required to include assessment metrics related to diversity programs and initiatives in the annual Department Assessment Presentations that take place each June. The January 2021 Divisional Planning Day with all Deans and Directors in Student Affairs had a large component of the day dedicated to sharing and discussing department Anti-Racist action plans/initiatives. .

Office of Multicultural Affairs

Training and Workshops:

The department facilitates diversity training and workshops with a number of student leaders and a growing number of administrators at both Rose Hill and Lincoln Center every academic year averaging anywhere between 800 - 1000+ students. Many of the training sessions occur in August before the academic year starts, however, many other requests come in during the year. This year, the majority of student leaders participated in implicit association tests as a requirement of the training, in addition to the incorporation of more content focused on Anti-Racism and Systemic racism. Some student groups include: Resident Assistants, Orientation Leaders, Commuter Assistants/Freshman Mentors, Ram Van Drivers, Global Transitions Assistants, and Rose Hill/Lincoln Center Ambassadors (tour guides). 

Racial Solidarity Network: This program provides the Fordham community an opportunity to increase empathy, awareness, and understanding around the complexities related to race and the unique lived experiences people share as racial and ethnic beings. A pilot of the program ran during Spring 2017 (one five-hour training over two days at each campus). The program officially launched in Fall of 2017 and is offered every November and February.

LGBTQ and Ally Network of Support: This program promotes an understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) students that is rooted in the Jesuit tenet of Cura Personalis and the principle that all persons should be treated with dignity and respect, which is explicit in Catholic teaching.  The program is open to the entire Fordham community (students, faculty and staff). One training session takes place on each campus during both the fall and spring semesters (five-hour training over two days on each campus each semester). This program is offered every October and March/April.

Diverse Student Engagement - Cultural Club Advising: OMA serves as the formal club advisor to four (4) cultural clubs at Lincoln Center and six (6) at Rose Hill. In this capacity, OMA staff meets with club leaders on a regular basis throughout the academic year to provide guidance and support in a variety of ways. These clubs include: 

Lincoln Center

Asian Pacific American Coalition (APAC) 
Black Student Alliance (BSA)
Caribbean Students Club (CSC)
Desi C.H.A.I. (South Asian)

Rose Hill:

Asian Cultural Exchange (ACE)
Asili:The Black Student Alliance  
Caribbean and African Student Association (CASA)
El Grito De Lares 
Fordham University Philippine American Club (FUPAC)
Fordham University South Asian Entity (FUSE)

As a note: While OMA does not have the capacity to serve as the formal advisor for every cultural club, any club is open to working with and being supported by the department.  

Cultural Committees and Cultural Programming/Initiatives: Direct undergraduate student leadership opportunities with OMA come through the form of cultural committees. The office oversees six (6) committees that span both RH and LC focused on the following identities: Latinx Heritage, LGBTQ History, Native and Indigenous Heritage, Black History, Women’s Herstory, and Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage. The committees plan programs and events during their designated months in addition to ongoing initiatives throughout the year.

The committee structure varies on committee size, however the following roles are consistent across the six:
Cultural Programming Coordinator (CPC): These students work directly with the OMA graduate interns and serve as the co-chairs for each of the committees. There are normally 12 CPCs, six (6) per campus.
Program Liaison (PL): These students are members of the overall committee, but work closely with the CPCs while taking on initiatives that may fall outside the scope of their committee’s designated month of programming.
Committee Member: These students serve as general committee members to assist the CPCs and PLs with events and initiatives. Depending on the size of the individual committees, there may also be additional sub-committee roles like finance, social media, visual arts, etc. 

Diversity Graduation Celebrations: In collaboration with the President’s Office, the Office of the Chief Diversity Officer, and Senior Week committees at RH and LC, OMA has been able to institutionalize four (4) identity based graduation celebrations for Asian, Black, Latinx, and LGBTQ seniors. Spring 2021 will mark the first year these programs will be offered to the undergraduate student population in this way. While there have been some similar events for Black and LGBTQ students during spring 2019, this iteration comprises student committees for each graduation celebration and commutation with the senior class will be done through Senior Week channels and website. 

Additional Diversity Collaborations
Ongoing:

DEI Admission Panels: Campus based spring student panels for admitted students of color. Partnership with Office of Admission
Diversity Leadership in a Global Society Conference and Diversity Networking Banquet: Partnership with Career Services
Global Transitions: Diversity workshop with incoming international students (started fall 2015).

Collaboration Completed, program now being ran by respective departments
PRISM LGBTQ Retreat: Collaboration with Campus Ministry.
Alumni Relations: Assistance with the formation of Rainbow Rams (LGBTQ Alumni affinity group) and the reformation of the Alumni of Color group - MOSIAC. 

New Student Orientation

Rose Hill New Student Orientation

Orientation Leader (OL) Training on Diversity: 6.5 hours of approximately 45 total training hours.

In collaboration with the Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA), the Orientation Coordinators implemented new diversity initiatives into OL Training. Three new sessions were Implicit Bias Test and Anti-Racism conversations, Captain Training, and OMA Part III. Counseling and Psychological Services assists in joint training for OLs in facilitating freshman small group conversations on the challenging topics of diversity and inclusion, sexual misconduct and gender-based discrimination covered in the Every Student Has a Voice Session.

Orientation Sessions for Freshmen Related to Diversity: 8.5 hours of approximately 21 hours

Candelighting Opening Ceremony (1 hour): since Fall 2012 this now-traditional opening to Orientation has focused on the core Jesuit Catholic and Mission-related values of respect for difference, civility, and inclusion in the Fordham student community.

Dean of Students' Welcome (30 minutes: at Summer, Fall, and Transfer/January Orientations): covers the Jesuit educational tenets, the Missions of the University and Student Affairs, and community standards including the core expectation that Fordham students respect the dignity of all others in the community, including those who are different from them.

12 Steps Toward Accepting Diversity with Mohamed Bilal (1 hour): "Former MTV Real World star and diversity consultant Mohammed Bilal has helped thousands of people move beyond the mere tolerance of difference. His "12 Steps Toward Accepting Diversity" is a fun, interactive presentation sprinkled with scholarship, hip-hop, and self-reflective narratives that equip the participant with easy, valuable, and powerful tools for appreciating the wondrous diversity around us."

Every Student Has a Voice (2 hours): "Join your orientation groups to explore and discuss various issues that may face you or a friend in your time at Fordham. Learn about how to make your time at Fordham a safe and enjoyable one." Monologues performed by Orientation Leaders dramatizing real world case studies and covering issues related to diversity, sexual misconduct, sexual identity and discrimination.

Hot Topics: Healthy Relationships (1 hour): mandatory Title IX/Campus Assault and Relationship Education training session covering gender discrimination. "New relationships are going to be an important part of your transition to college. How will you make healthy, responsible choices and avoid high risk behavior in social settings and in meeting new people? This interactive, inclusive and realistic session with guest presenters Marshall Miller and Dorian Solot begins the conversation. Get practical advice to make sure your relationships are based on safety, respect and responsible decision making."

Dean of Students' LGBTQ and Ally Reception (2 hours): in partnership with the campus LGBT student organization, this session invites incoming students to connect with other students, administrators and resources at the University.

Multicultural Reception (1 hour): hosted by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, this session invites all students and particularly students of color and other diverse identities to meet with students and staff at the University and connect with resources and other new students.

Lincoln Center New Student Orientation

Orientation Leader (OL) Training on Diversity: 3 hours of approximately 24 total training hours

Office of Multicultural Affairs Diversity Training Session about diversity and inclusion training.  The Orientation Coordinators and Student Involvement office staff leads a training for OLs in facilitating freshman small group conversations on the challenging topics of diversity and inclusion, implicit bias, anti-racism, sexual misconduct and gender-based discrimination covered in the Real Talk Session.

Orientation Sessions for Freshmen Related to Diversity: 5.5 hours (of a total of approximately 18 hours)

12 Steps Toward Accepting Diversity with Mohamed Bilal (1 hour): "Former MTV Real World star and diversity consultant, Mohammed Bilal, has helped thousands of people move beyond the sheer tolerance of difference. His "12 Steps Toward Accepting Diversity" is a fun, interactive presentation sprinkled with scholarship, hip-hop, and self-reflective narratives that equip the participant with easy, valuable, and powerful tools for appreciating the wondrous diversity around us."

Real Talk (1.5 hours): A performance by Orientation Leaders dramatizing real world case studies and covering issues related to diversity, sexual misconduct, sexual identity, prescription drug misuse, body image and discrimination. The performance is followed by a discussion led by an OL with the small groups that meet each day during the 3-day Orientation.

Multicultural Reception (1 hour): hosted by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, this session invites all students and particularly students of color and other diverse identities to meet with students and staff at the University and connect with resources and other new students.

LGBT and Ally Reception (1 hours): in partnership with the campus LGBT student organization, this session invites incoming students to connect with other students, administrators and resources at the University.

First Year Formation

While multiple elements of the course syllabus (called modules) touch on diversity, inclusion and civility, four sections are the main focus.

Being Part of the Fordham Community Module: Students explore what it means to be part of a large and multi-faceted community and they establish that membership in a community comes with rights and responsibilities that come with membership. Students examine a number of concepts led by the instructors and student assistants: what it means to be an "Open Community" (A college or university is a place where different ideas are discussed and debated and where civility is powerfully affirmed), a Just Community (A college or university is a place where the sacredness of the person is honored and where diversity is aggressively pursued), and a Caring Community (A college or university is a place where the well being of each member is sensitively supported and where service to others is encouraged), to name a few.

Introduction to Social Justice Module: Students explore the connection between the University's mission, social justice, and community service. They begin to examine their level of competency with social justice issues and how these issues affect the world in which we live. Students identify ways they can incorporate social justice into their everyday life. Activities include a Privilege walk and reading the Kolvenbach, S.J. article The Service of Faith and the Promotion of Justice in American Jesuit Higher Education.

Leadership in a Global Society Module: Students are introduced to the concepts of social and personal identity, and begin to explore their own identities. They are given the opportunity to explore the meaning and value of diversity, and its relevance to their undergraduate experience here at Fordham and as global citizens. Students begin to expand the ways in which they think about difference, inclusion, and respect for the perspectives of others.

Values and Ethics Module: Students construct their own understandings of values and ethics and create connections between their values and ethical decision-making skills. Students will be able to recognize the impact of values and ethics as a community.

Office of Residential Life

Rose Hill and Lincoln Center Resident Director Training

12 hours of 85.5 hours

Office of Multicultural Affairs Diversity Training Session: 3 hour session to educate and prepare Resident Directors to train Resident Assistants in this area.

A. Implicit bias and Anti-Racism for  RD training (1.5 hours) Professional staff engaged in bias tests and discussed their results during training. Professional staff was able to learn more about the different types of bias such as colorism, gender, physical, and religion.

B. OMA & Xenophobia/Racism following COVID-19 (1.5 hours) Staff learn and understand impacts of COVID-19 in the lens of xenophobia and racism. In addition, staff will discuss how to combat this both personally and professionally.

Campus Assault and Relationship Education (CARE) Training: 4 hour training on Title IX/Campus Assault and Relationship Education covering RD staff role in addressing campus gender discrimination.

Conduct and Students on the Autism Spectrum (1 hour) Staff watched a webinar to better grasp best methods of how to work with students on the spectrum, specifically how to make conduct more inclusive.

LC Book Club Professional Development Series: 4 dialogues throughout the Fall semester to review and reflect on How to be Anti Racist by Ibram x Kendi and 3 combined book discussions with ORL RH on Lead From the Outside by Stacey Abrams. (Total: 8 hours)

Motivating Our Students Session (1.5 hours) Staff will better understand how to motivate students in a variety of areas and concepts of stigma and accessing students will be discussed with CPS. 

Rose Hill Residential Life Professional Development Series: 5 meetings throughout the Fall semester to review scholarly journals and discuss topics related to diversity and inclusion on campus. (Total: 5 hours)

Rose Hill Resident Assistant Staff Diversity-Related Training

11.5 hours out of 60 hours total

Office of Multicultural Affairs Diversity Training Session (3 hours): session meant to help staff get to know and identify OMA staff, explain how Residential Life staff can work with OMA to support students, list the programs and resources that OMA offers, train staff on how to program on diversity and on how to have difficult conversations around diversity topics including privilege. Additional content included implicit bias testing and anti-racism content.

In-Hall Training: 30 minutes follow up training in each residence hall to follow the main session for the entire staff conducted by OMA.

Behind Closed Doors (3.5 hours): includes a scenario about residents telling racist or homophobic jokes in a public setting. Each scenario lasted 20 minutes and there were 12 scenarios for the new RAs.

Campus Assault and Relationship Education Training: 5 hour total training on Title IX/Campus Assault and Relationship Education covering RA staff role in addressing campus gender discrimination.

Residential Life Social Justice Coordinating Committee (Rose Hill): conducts weekly educational sessions on various diversity/social justice/social identity for Professional Staff and Resident Assistants. 

Diversity Programming “Menu" for resident assistants to connect with campus partners for programming efforts to create welcoming communities including programming with the Commuter Assistant staff in Student Involvement, Center for Community Engaged Learning, Office for Multicultural Affairs. 

21 Day Racial Equity Challenge through the Ignatian Solidarity Network: had staff participate.
Coordinated a staff read of Leading from the Outside by Stacy Abrams.

Bronx Resource for Resident Assistants: created a resource for the residence halls to "bridge residents to the borough with multiple community activity ideas (restaurants, museums, cultural experiences etc). 

Community Volunteer Opportunities: staff volunteered in the community, creating 500+ COVID safety packets for Part of the Cause (POTS) during our Professional Staff Training. 

In-Hall Social Justice Activities for RA staff:  passive and active programming and facilitation of conversations in staff meetings.

Lincoln Center Resident Assistant Staff Diversity-Related Training

17 hours out of 86 hours total

Office of Multicultural Affairs Diversity Training Session: 4 hour session on diversity topics and facilitating small group conversations and interaction.

A. Implicit bias and Anti-Racism for the RA/RFM training (2 hours) Student staff engaged in a bias test and discussed in the training session their results. Student staff was also able to learn more about the different types of racism and how to navigate conversations around social justice issues with their peers and residents.

B. Antiracism- Colorism: (1 hour) Staff has reached out to OMA to collaborate on an in-service dedicated to learning more about colorism and diving into how this plays a larger role in anti-racist work.

The Student Population and the International Student Experience (1.5 hours): Resident Director is in the process of planning an in-service training session on mental health and international student engagement with Dr. Ji Yu from Counseling and Psychological Services. The presentation will take place on April 13, 2021 during a Resident Assistant and Resident First-Year Mentor in-service training.

Ethics Session (1 hour): presentation by RD.

Supporting Our Students Session (1.5 hours): CPS presented on supporting students in their mental health with a focus on how to sustain continued follow up with residents after referrals to CPS. There was also a review on CPS services and how to support general mental health of students, especially around those with depression and anxiety.

"Behind Closed Doors" (Simulations)Session (7 hours): role play scenarios to practice working with students on counseling concerns, which include scenarios related to diversity and inclusion. Counseling and Psychological Services staff facilitated the session to prepare the RAs/RFMs before the role plays and RD staff facilitated the role plays and debriefed after their completion.

Case Studies (2 hours) ORL presented six scenarios for staff discussed in breakout rooms. The topics ranged from covid-19 policies, Title IX, mental health, bias/hate speech, and uncomfortable v unsafe. Staff were able to review how they would handle the situation as well as understand the resources available to the student(s).

Session on Programming for Diverse Student Populations (1 hour): presentation by RD.

Campus Assault and Relationship (CARE) Education Training: 1.5 hour total training on Title IX/Campus Assault and Relationship Education covering RA/RFM staff role in addressing campus gender discrimination.

In-service RA/RFM continuing education programs on diversity topics during the fall, spring, and January training: 1.5 hours for fall and spring and 2 hours during January training.

  1. Coalition On Action and Learning (COAL) committee members held a training session during the Resident Assistant and Resident First-Year Mentor winter training in January 2021. The session explored how to create brave spaces to discuss diversity, equity, and inclusion topics. Thirty-seven (37) staff members were trained. (2 hours)

  2. Coalition On Action and Learning (COAL) committee members are in the process of planning a comprehensive diversity, equity, and inclusion training session to be facilitated during Resident Assistant and Resident First-Year Mentor training in August 2021 by the incoming COAL team. Sessions are still pending and will be announced next quarter. (3 hours)

Book Club: (4 hours) Staff collaborated with Campus Ministry on a group discussion on the Robin DiAngelo book White Fragility, for student staff members. Sessions were held on November 17 and December 8. As part of the collective, group members are participating in on-going reflective journaling following topical prompts provided by the professional staff. In addition, another book club is being executed that caters to BIPOC student staff, “Feminism is for Everybody” by Bell Hooks and allows for dialogue about the definition of Feminism, in relation to what the media, their own experiences, and the implications of intersectionality with race and class.

Resident Assistant and Resident Freshmen Mentor Staff Diversity-Related Education Programming Requirement: each of 97 Resident Assistants at Rose Hill and 41 Resident Assistants and Resident Freshmen Mentors at Lincoln Center are required to complete at least one diversity education program per semester.

  1. Race Talks Sessions (LC):  (6 hours) Race Talks are a series of programs designed to raise awareness of the issues surrounding racism on our campus and in our country while working to promote inclusion and empathy through learning about and reflecting on, various topics including privilege, power, oppression, intent v impact, microaggressions, etc. During each session four to five questions are presented by Coalition On Action and Learning (COAL) committee members and participants silently reflect and then engage in dialogue on the question. Varies topics include: Black Lives Matter, Allyship and Accountability, and Unpacking the Election. Dates of events are: 10/21/2020, 11/5/2020, 11/18/2020, 2/26/2021, 3/12/2021.

  2. Talk About It Tuesday (LC): (1 hour) 11/10/2020 Topic: This event was a dialogue with the president of Filipino's of Lincoln Center Offering Welcome (FLOW) student organization exploring belonging and the identity of Filipino-Americans. This event was held as part of Filipino Heritage Month. 

  3. COAL Survey (LC): (3 hours) Ask current residents which areas of diversity, equity, and inclusion they are in need of learning more about through COAL programming. On December 4, 2020, the survey was sent out to all Fordham residential students from the fall 2020 semester, as well as those who deferred housing in the fall 2020. The survey closed on January 8, 2021. There were 20 responses. Thirty (30) percent of respondents indicated that they were interested in learning more about anti-racism, privilege, oppression, etc. Sixty (60) percent of respondents stated that they would be interested in exploring these topics through service-learning in the New York City community. 

  4. Unity in the CommUNITY (LC): (1 hour) RAs provided a safe space for open dialogue about the challenges facing the surrounding community. They also discussed different resources on and off campus that can further the conversation regarding power, privilege and oppression, as well as how students can get more involved in the community.

  5. Wellness Week (LC): (1 hour) On October 21, 2020, RHA partnered with Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS) to host an in-person event which provided students an opportunity to learn a deeper understanding of wellness and health--including professional tips and methods to ensure health is preserved.  With this, CPS discussed mental health resources for BI/POC students and campus resources available to the specified population. 

  6. Let’s Talk About Environmental Racism (LC): (1 hour) RAs held a discussion about environmental racism and the impact it has on different communities. In their discussion they were able to educate the residents on how environmental racism affects other people, gave them resources to help other people, and stressed the importance of advocating for others by utilizing the implementation of People for and with others.

  7. Cultural Appreciation vs. Cultural Appropriation: How To Honor Other Cultures (LC): (45 minutes) RA educated residents on the difference between cultural appropriation and cultural appreciation during the halloween holiday. 

  8. How to be an Ally? (LC): (45 minutes) RA engaged residents in a conversation around allyship and how to be an ally to marginalized communities.

  9. Re-Centering Indigenous Peoples' Day (LC): (1 hour) Residential students discussed the history and controversy surrounding Columbus Day.  The event, led by student leaders, also educated the community on the Indigenous/Native American community--including historical occurrences, continued injustices and disadvantages, what practices are necessary to honor, support, and show appreciation to the Indigenous Peoples of the stolen land. 

  10. Chinatown Hopping (LC): (2 hours) Residents went on a tour of local businesses in Chinatown. Residents had some conversations around the pandemic's impact on small businesses as well as business' treatment of workers, specifically asian identifying individuals.

Passive Programming: (2 hours) Student staff on both campuses have continued Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Bulletin Boards. Many have covered Black History Month and highlighted important black figures from the civil rights' movement. Also, staff have discussed environmental racism on their bulletin boards. For March, several floors focused on Women's History Month. One floor highlighted Asian American Influential Women, while another discussed Native Women. Another floor explained school segregation, Brown v the Board of Education, and Afrocentric Schools. Another floor reviewed Sign Language as well. 

Office for Student Involvement: Commuter Assistant/Commuter Freshmen Mentors

Rose Hill Commuter Assistant Staff Diversity-Related Training

2.5 hours out of 24 hours total

Office of Multicultural Affairs Diversity Training Session: 1.5 hour session including self awareness training and exploration of the intersections of student gender, racial, sexual and other identities in various contexts relevant to the CA position. This year, students participated in an implicit bias test prior to the training and engaged in dialogue about implicit bias, anti-racism and systemic racism during the training. 

Campus Security Authority/Campus Assault and Relationship Education Training: 1 hour training on Title IX/Campus Assault and Relationship Education covering staff role in addressing gender discrimination.

Lincoln Center Commuter Freshmen Mentor Staff Diversity-Related Training: 4.5 out of 44 hours total

Office of Multicultural Affairs Diversity Training Session: 1 hour session. In this session, CFMs will understand the impact that social identities (including race, class, and first-generation status) have on the freshman commuter experience in order to build relationships with freshman commuter students. CFMs will learn the power of language and how sometimes what you intend to express is not how it is received by others. This year, students participated in an implicit bias test prior to the training and engaged in dialogue about implicit bias, anti-racism and systemic racism during the training. 

The Freshman Diary: Understanding & Responding to First Year Student Needs: 1 hour session. In this session, CFMs will identify the challenges facing first-year college students (including issues surrounding sexual identity, religious identity, racial and ethnic identity, mental health, academic expectations, social expectations, etc.) in order to better address their freshman commuters' needs. CFMs will demonstrate skills appropriate for responding to the needs of first-year students, and identify appropriate resources on campus.

Campus Security Authority/Campus Assault and Relationship Education Training: 1.5 hours training on Title IX/Campus Assault and Relationship Education covering staff role in addressing gender discrimination.

Office for Student Involvement

Rose Hill

Freshman Year Formation Diversity Module: Fordham University’s First Year Experience is a zero-credit course designed to promote student engagement in the University’s distinct Jesuit mission in order to support student success and celebrate human difference. As the Jesuit University of New York, our mantra is “New York is my campus, Fordham is my school”. This course seeks to help and encourage students to experience New York City.  In this course, students are exposed to the tools, knowledge, and understanding that will assist in inclusion competencies needed for all members of the Fordham community.  A new Module implemented this year “Bias Incidents” helps students distinguish between a hate crime and a bias incident, learn the steps to report bias incidents and the importance of reporting, uncover and become aware of any hidden implicit biases they may have, and engage in discussions about diversity and inclusion both at Fordham and beyond. Another new Module that was implemented just last year “Mental Health” helps students understand the concepts involved in normal brain function, and the role the brain plays in determining thoughts, feelings, and behaviours, understanding the mental health and mental illness, differentiate the difference between having a mental health problem and having a mental illness, and comprehend the language of both mental health and mental illness. In the Module “Being Part of the Fordham Ramily” students learn how they are part of a larger, multi-faceted community and that membership in a community comes with rights and responsibilities. Students will integrate the concepts presented into their present community experience at Fordham University, a Jesuit Catholic Institution and will be able to explore the context of the development of the Bronx community in order to foster a growing relationship with the Bronx. The Module titled “Social Justice” students begin to explore the role of privilege in society. Students will be able to define the connection and difference between social justice and community service. Students will identify ways that they can incorporate social justice into their everyday life. In the Module “Identity Development in a Global Society” students are introduced to the concepts of social and personal identity, and begin to explore their own identities. Students explore the meaning and value of diversity, its relevance to their undergraduate experience here at Fordham, and as global citizens. Students begin to expand the ways in which they think about difference, inclusion, and respect for the perspectives of others.  

United Student Government, Campus Programming Board, Commuter Students Association, Residence Halls Association Diversity Month: the month of November is devoted to student-led programming on diversity, civility, and inclusion, a collaboration between advisers in Student Involvement and Residential Life, Campus Activities Board, Residence Halls Association, Commuting Students Association, and the United Student Government. These four organizations came together throughout the 2017-2018 school year for an initiative called “The Year of Fordham Voices.” Each organization brought this to life through a number of different programs and initiatives. This included a launch week in October in which each organization hosted events that celebrated different components of diversity.

Diversity Month Video 2016: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iT4vg7pxaRQ

Rose Hill Fordham University Emerging Leaders Program (FUEL): a semester-long program meeting one hour per week to conduct leadership skills training and discussion.  FUEL consists of workshops, interactive sessions, and networking opportunities and is marketed to sophomores and juniors. In 2019, 54 students graduated from the program. One session involved students attending the Global Diversity and Inclusion Conference.  In the 2020 program, Fordham’s President Council member, Julie Gebauer, presented a workshop on tips for building inclusive organizations. For the 2021 program, the Office of Multicultural Affairs will be hosting a workshop and in addition to this students can receive credit towards the certificate by participating in OMA’s LGBTQ+ and Ally Network.  

Rose Hill Student Organizations: 22 student organizations supported by the Office for Student Involvement in partnership with United Student Government have diversity and inclusion as a substantive part of their mission. Some of these organizations are the most active on campus. Through their activities, Rose Hill is immersed in a variety of events, both large and small scale. Examples include academic club-organized mentoring and tutoring events, support to cultural clubs hosting documentary nights with discussion, celebratory nights commemorating holidays, educational excursions, and invitations to speakers.

Lincoln Center

Freshman Year Formation Diversity Module: information included above under New Student Orientation.

Diversity Dinner: Since Fall 2015, at the beginning of each semester, the Office for Student Involvement with support from the Office of Multicultural Affairs works with cultural clubs to host a dinner to which all new students of color are specifically invited to meet upper-class students of color. All new students are encouraged to attend, but special invitations are sent based on the ethnicity students indicated on their application to the university. The upper-class students talk informally over dinner about getting involved with clubs and other resources they found helpful on campus as a student of color on a predominately white campus. This occurred virtually in Fall 2020.

Fordham Advocates Cultural Enrichment (FACE): The Office for Student Involvement and the Office of Multicultural Affairs jointly sponsor this week-long series of programs that focus on diversity and multiculturalism, typically in March.

Lincoln Center Fordham University Emerging Leaders Program (FUEL): a semester-long program meeting one hour per week to conduct leadership skills training and discussion. FUEL consists of workshops, interactive sessions, and networking opportunities and is marketed to freshmen and sophomores. In Spring 2016, 42 students graduated from the program. One session specifically on the topic of inclusion and was facilitated by the Office of Multicultural Affairs. In Spring 2021, the program adjusted to the first part of the semester in the hopes of increasing attendance before midterm academic assignments. The first week of the program was focused on Anti-Racism.

Lincoln Center Student Organizations: 12 student organizations supported by the Office for Student Involvement in partnership with United Student Government have diversity and inclusion as a substantive part of their mission. Some of these organizations are the most active on campus. Through their activities, Lincoln Center is immersed in a variety of events, both large and small scale. Examples include celebratory nights commemorating holidays, educational excursions to events and sites throughout NYC, and forums and discussions on campus.

Career Services

The Office of Career Services integrates diversity, equity and inclusion throughout all programs and works to ensure employers are accessible to all students. The Office is working with students to understand their needs for navigating the new world of work and recently held an Equity and Inclusion Career Focus Group with over 50 students on March 9, 2021 to provide input for reimagining  and fully integrating solutions into the office.  The Assistant Director of Diversity and Inclusion position is open.

Diversity Training: Training for Career Services staff began Summer 2016, conducted by the Office of Multicultural Affairs. All new hires attend the Racial Solidarity and LGBTQ training sessions and are encouraged to support DEI initiatives campus and community wide. All team members complete the University Diversity training annually.

Diversity Leadership in a Global Society Conference:  Career Services works collaboratively with employers and university partners to plan an annual,  full-day conference focused on diversity in the world of work. The conference is designed to provide workplace information to a diverse group of students who would like to engage in conversations about diversity and how intersections of identity affect the work environment.  The conference will be celebrating its ninth year in 2021. This year the Conference is being renamed and reimagined Diversity Equity and Inclusion Summit.

Diversity Networking Banquet: This annual event is designed to provide networking opportunities for our increasingly multicultural and diverse student populations and prospective employers. The Diversity Networking Banquet is a unique experience that provides highly motivated students, with multicultural backgrounds, the opportunity to network with accredited employers.

Equity and Inclusion Networking Banquet: This annual event is designed to provide networking opportunities for our increasingly multicultural and diverse student populations and prospective employers. The Diversity Equity and Inclusions Networking Banquet is a unique experience that provides highly motivated students with multicultural backgrounds, the opportunity to network with accredited employers. 

Equity & Inclusion Conversations:  Career Services created four additional programs for the 2018-2019 academic year to connect students with industry leaders focusing on Global Diversity & Inclusion relating to the workplace. The themes for the programs were Work Ethic and HR Practices, Out in the Workplace LGBT panel,  Women’s Leadership and Diversity in the Publishing Industry.  These interactive presentations provide the students the opportunity to engage in career conversations with industry experts. The director is on the planning committee and presents annually at the Women’s Philanthropy Summit in collaboration with DAUR. 

Technologies Promoting Equity & Inclusion: The Office of Career Services continuously selects tools and resources to promote equal access to all. In 2017 Handshake was chosen as the Career Management Platform in part based on its commitment to equity and inclusion.  Handshake's mission is to democratize access to opportunity and ensure any student can build a great career, regardless of who they know, what school they attend, or where they live. Our team shows up each day to create a more equitable and inclusive future for the over 14 million (and growing!) students on Handshake today.”  We work hard to ensure all students have access to all opportunities. In 2020, PeopleGrove was selected as a mentoring platform to connect all students to alumni equally.  PeopleGrove’s mission is to ensure each and every student and professional has access to a community and the connections needed to succeed. 

Training and Education: The Career Services team members are constantly seeking out external training opportunities and conferences dedicated to improving and expanding ideas and building skills for an inclusive community. The Office of Career Services presents and trains in partnership with employers and university departments including Veteran Career Liaison Training and Partnership with Office of Military and Veterans Affairs,customized Handshake workshop to Student Veteran Association, professional development interview on the Vet Scoop podcast.  In addition Career Services presents at Orientation for Cultural Clubs, held a panel discussion on Back to Basics: Reimaging Practices Panel (Breaking down Racial and Social Injustices at Fordham) with Co-sponsored by DAUR and the Alumni Affinity Group, Presented Resume Love with HEOP LC

Offering Multicultural Affairs Training for Student Workers & FCAs 
Presenting Navigating Your Career and Your Maternal Mental Health workshop for alumni
CSTEP (LC/RH) and HEOP (RH) drop in hours 

Employer Programming: (in addition to individual employer hosted sessions)
Misconceptions and Breaking Barriers- Panel speakers from PwC, Northwell, Department of Education, SMBC, Womxn in Workspaces Alumni Panel and the Diversity Consortium 2021:(Fordham, Hofstra, Adelphi, St. John’s, Fairfield, UConn and Queens College) Equity & Inclusion in the Workplace: What Are Employee Resource Groups and How Do They Support You?

Counseling and Psychological Services

Multicultural Suicide Prevention/Awareness Brochures: These brochures were developed to enhance community understanding and awareness of the mental health needs of diverse student groups in order to reduce their suicide risk. Brochures also developed in Spanish and Chinese

Weekly Multicultural/Diversity Seminar for Postdoctoral Fellows: Weekly seminars on various aspects of diversity and multicultural counseling that are facilitated by internal staff or an outside speaker.

Didactic Seminars for CPS Interns/Externs:  These seminars take place 3-4 times per semester and focus on the intersections of diversity, multiculturalism, social justice and mental health.

Ongoing Clinical Supervision and Training for Staff on Diversity and Mental Health: Clinical supervision for staff and trainees that attend to the interplay between inter-group, inter-cultural and intra-psychic dynamics.

Digital Wellness Newsletters:  Newsletters focusing on diversity and mental health and can be found at the following  links:

https://www.fordham.edu/downloads/file/5355/newsletter_6_-_spring_2016

https://www.fordham.edu/download/downloads/id/9981/welcome_to_wellness_8_-_spring_2018.pdf

Coordinator for Diversity, Inclusion & Social Justice Initiatives:

Position created to address the needs of marginalized students with regards to mental health support and programming. 

CPS Statement & Resources on Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Justice

https://www.fordham.edu/info/27543/cps_statement_and_resources_on_diversity_equity_inclusion_and_justice

Ongoing Support Groups for Historically Marginalized Student Groups (i.e. Black Students, International Students, LGBTQ+ Students, etc.)

Post-Doctoral Fellowship - International Students Specialization: Position created to enhance outreach, prevention and clinical services to international student population

Participation in Psychology Dept’s Monthly Colloquium Series on Race, Racism & Social Justice

Health Services                                              

LGBTQ Staff Training: Ongoing LGBTQ training for entire staff on sexual health presented by the Montefiore Oval Clinic on Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs), and HIV prevention through PREP and PEP.  Staff attends the Bronx Knows Meetings which helps promote awareness of HIV status, HIV education, access to quality care and prevention.   Staff attended Working with Transgender and Gender Non Conforming Persons presentation and GENDA and LGBTQ Rights in NY webinar.  

Interpretive Services:  These services are utilized at RH and LC to communicate medical needs to international students whose first language is not English.

Diversity Training for Administrative Staff: All administrative staff members are required to attend both the LGBTQ and Ally Network of Support.  Staff will attend the Racial Solidarity Network trainings offered by OMA.                                        

Disability Services                                           

Training and Workshops: The Office of Disability Services (ODS) facilitates multiple training workshops with different groups of  student leaders and faculty at both Rose Hill and Lincoln Center Campuses every year. The training occurs throughout the year, depending on the need. Each year we train these student groups: Resident Assistants at both campuses, Rose Hill Society Student Life Council, the Fordham football team, Student Veterans’ Orientation, GSAS new student orientation, MSW student resource fair, RH Student Council, and Philosophy Phd  first time student professors. Additionally, ODS presents to the Modern Language Department on an annual basis and has just begun to present at new faculty orientation.

Workshops: The Office of Disability Services participates in various training throughout the year. The staff takes part in multiple webinars and occasionally attends in-person training at various NYC colleges and universities.

University Transportation                           

Diversity Training for Student Staff: Student staff members are required to attend a diversity training session with the Office of Multicultural Affairs that is offered biannually to accommodate staff turnover. The session focuses on issues related to Ram Van drivers and office staff, ranging from communication skills/techniques to appropriate radio choices.

Diversity Training for Administrative Staff: All administrative staff members are required to attend both the LGBTQ and Ally Network of Support and the Racial Solidarity Network training offered by OMA.

Student Leadership Diversity & Inclusion Initiative: Special efforts will be made to recruit and retain student leaders from a wide range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds, in order to better reflect the broader Ram Van community. University Transportation believes this will drive a stronger sense of inclusion for all students within the department.

Dining Services                                               

Diversity and inclusion are the backbone of the company contracted to provide food and services to customers on the Fordham campus; Aramark.  Their vibrant workforce is essential to their success and our success on campus.  World wide, Aramark employs more than 270,000 unique people in different cultures around the world and each one of their employees is unique.  At Fordham and around the world, Aramark pushes to make sure the workplace is reflective of the diverse nature of the communities and customers it serves.

On campus, over 270 people are employed in dining services.  The department desires people with different abilities, backgrounds, experiences and orientations to come to Aramark at Fordham and be successful.  The goal is to encourage a culture that appreciates people’s differences and similarities.   

The diversity and inclusion programs and initiatives are focused around these areas:

  • Workforce:  The goal is to hire, retain, and develop people with different backgrounds that reflect the communities that are being served.

  • Workplace: The department strives to create a workplace culture that values and leverages differences among people and drives innovation through inclusion.

  • Marketplace:  we partner with diverse suppliers and community organizations  so we can deliver culturally relevant products   and services.  

  • Training on inclusion of gender-free speech training bi-yearly

  • Partnership - Active collaboration with the Office of Multicultural Affairs with events in dining

  • Development of an on-campus diversity champion to assist in developing a diverse environment in dining as well as participate in any campus diversity initiatives                               

We also have a number of resource groups available to our employees, giving them access to like-minded people with similar backgrounds and interests, including:

  • Aramark young professionals

  • LEAD

  • Synergy

  • Aramark PRIDE

  • Women's Business Resource Network

  • Aramark Salute (Veterans)

  • Impacto Hispanic Employee Resource Group

  • Rising Sun Indigenous Employee Resource Group

  • Aramark’s diversity and inclusion efforts have been recognized by many notable organizations like:

  • The Human Rights Campaign

  • Diversity Inc.

  • Black Enterprise Magazine

  • CAREERS & the disABLED Magazine

  • LATINO Magazine

Updated:  Spring 2021