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Current Upper Level Courses

Rose Hill
Fall 2021

ARHI 2553 – Art, Gender, and Sexuality in Asia (4 Credits)
This upper-level art history course probes into artistic and cultural representations of bodies in Asia in relation to such themes as sex, gender, sexuality, race, nationhood, war, and post-humanity. Through thematic examinations of diverse bodily representations, students will learn a broad range of interpretive tools and frameworks to appreciate artistic objects.

ARHI 3200 – Museum Studies in Ancient Art (4 Credits)
This class examines the display of Ancient Art using the collection at Fordham as a foundation.  The class considers the aesthetic issues of exhibiting ancient objects and addresses the ethical concerns of collecting “un-provenanced” antiquities.

ARHI 4230 – Art and Ethics: Articulating Function in the Visual Arts
This course will examine the inter-disciplinary dialogue between art and ethics. What exactly do the terms "art" and "ethics" denote... and connote? Can one nudge the terms together into some kind of binary concept, like "ethical art" or "artful morality" (!)? Or do these terms relate at some other, deeper level, with a common ontological foundation? In the course of the semester, we will consider the relationship between art and ethics, as they have surfaced in philosophy, in theology, in history, in the history of art, and in art criticism from antiquity to the present era.

ARHI 4600 - Senior Seminar (4 Credits)
As the capstone seminar for art history majors, this course has several goals: to give art history majors an introduction to the principal thinkers who shaped the field of art history; to explore some of the key methodological approaches to art history today; to hone students’ skills in critical reading and viewing; and to provide students the opportunity to conduct independent research on an art historical topic of their own choosing. Offered fall semesters only; required for majors.


Rose Hill
Spring 2022

ARHI 2257 – Modern Latin American Art (4 Credits)
In modern period, Latin American nations, the by-product of European colonization, developed artistic traditions that grew out of their own distinct realities. This course looks at two great shaping forces of modern Latin American Art: nationalism, which called on visual art to both create a national identity and to reflect it; and modernism, an aesthetic movement that insisted on artistic autonomy. In more recent years, the political integrity of Latin American nations has been challenged by oppressive governments and imperialism, leading artists to seek new ways of expressing ideas and identity within and beyond the national sphere. We will also be seizing the many opportunities that New York offers to see Latin American art firsthand at sites that include El Museo del Barrio, Sotheby's, and the Cecilia de Torres Gallery.

ARHI 2305 – Gods, Monsters, Heroes, and Mortals: Narrative in Greek Art (4 Credits)
This class will examine the development of storytelling on Greek painted pottery and sculpture.  The course is structured thematically, rather than chronologically or by medium, and relies on the study of primary source material, ancient works of art and literature.  This class meets at the Metropolitan Museum of Art every Friday during the designated time of 1:00-2:15 and at Rose Hill on Tuesday.

ARHI 2410 – Northern Renaissance Art (4 Credits)
Northern Renaissance art draws inspiration from the cultural and social developments of the early modern era (circa 1400-1600). Painters strove to depict the bustling energy of expanding cities, sculptors fabricated dynamic ensembles aimed at making tangible the subtleties of church doctrine, and illuminators and printmakers created precious and personal works that enhanced the domestic sphere. In this course we will explore such phenomena, considering how masters—including Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Dürer, and Hieronymus Bosch—experimented and innovated in an age of artistic revolution. 


Lincoln Center
Fall 2021

ARHI 2450 – 17th Century Art (4 Credits)
This course surveys artistic developments in Europe in the Seventeenth Century and their relationship to the shifting political and intellectual landscape. The art of the Baroque is characterized by an interest in emotional appeal, visual immediacy, and the articulation of power. Major artists include Caravaggio, Bernini, Velázquez, Rubens, Poussin, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. The themes we will explore include the relationship of art production and reception to the political and religious environment, the development of national styles, the intersection of art, nature and science, and the emergence of academies as systems for artistic training and political control. In addition to introducing students to the visual arts of the Seventeenth Century, this course will emphasize the critical analysis of works of art and of art-historical scholarship.

ARHI 2525 – Museums from Revolution to Restitution (1793-present) (4 Credits)
This course considers the past and future roles of museums in our global society.  Beginning with the founding of the Louvre in the wake of the French Revolution, we will explore the relationships between museums, their collections, and their diverse publics—people who build them and work in them, the artists whose works they display, the audiences who visit them, and the communities they surround.  Issues examined include theories of collecting; the practices and ethics of exhibition; empire and nation-building; colonial theft and restitution; and forms of institutional critique and anti-colonial action.  This class will incorporate site visits to institutions in Manhattan and the Bronx.

ARHI 2621 – Art and Fashion in the Modern Age (4 Credits)
This class is a survey of fashion history focused on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  It will incorporate critical readings, film, and other primary sources with the aim of understanding significant changes in dress and how clothing functions in culture.  Fashion is treated as a complex system combining material, image, and body with art and design history.  We will look at couture and ready to wear, alongside subculture, counterculture and street styles with an emphasis on how they fit into the visual culture and social environment of the period.  Image-driven lectures in conjunction with visual analysis will be the vehicle for critical reflection and understanding. 

ARHI 4555 – Art and Ecology (4 credits)
This course investigates the work of artists, writers, and filmmakers who have dedicated themselves to creating solutions to specific environmental problems or whose works have broadened public concern for ecologically degraded environments. Students will participate in a wide variety of discourses about the personal, public, and ethical dimensions of current environmental issues. 


Lincoln Center
Spring 2022

ARHI 2535 – History of Photography (4 Credits)
This course explores the possibilities of the photographic medium since its inception in the early nineteenth century. We will focus on photography in what is now called the United States, with attention to issues of race, migration, and belonging. We will consider a wide array of images, including paper silhouettes, daguerreotypes, cartes-de-visite, family albums, yearbooks, passport photographs, and film. Practitioners explored include J.P. Ball, Dorothea Lange, Roy DeCarava, Tōyō Miyatake, Graciela Iturbide, ASCO, Carrie Mae Weems, Wendy Red Star, Corky Lee, and Deana Lawson. Classes will be supplemented by a darkroom workshop, museum visits, and opportunities to take photographs.

ARHI 3455 – Michelangelo (4 Credits)
This course surveys the life, times, and works of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564). We will trace his development from his origins in fifteenth-century Florence to his role as the leading artist of sixteenth-century Rome and his ultimate fate as the “divine” artist memorialized by Giorgio Vasari. Our primary goal is to examine his major projects in painting, sculpture, and architecture, and analyze the social, artistic, political, and religious context that informed their production and reception. Throughout the course, we will be attentive to the “myth of Michelangelo” promoted by his principal biographers, Giorgio Vasari and Ascanio Condivi, and by the artist himself. We will test their histories of Michelangelo’s career against evidence drawn from other sources, including contemporary documents and modern scholarship.

ARHI 3621 –Museum Collaboration: Garmenting, Costume and Contemporary Art (4 Credits)
This course, in conjunction with an international exhibition at the Museum of Art and Design, examines contemporary art’s engagement with costume. It focuses on artists who use garments to examine issues of subjectivity, identity, and difference. This phenomenon may be identified by the term “garmenting,” which describes art that takes the form of garments to be exhibited as sculpture and installation.

ARHI 4230 – Art and Ethics: Articulating Function in the Visual Arts (4 Credits)
This course will examine the inter-disciplinary dialogue between art and ethics. What exactly do the terms "art" and "ethics" denote... and connote? Can one nudge the terms together into some kind of binary concept, like "ethical art" or "artful morality" (!)? Or do these terms relate at some other, deeper level, with a common ontological foundation? We will consider the relationship between art and ethics, as they have surfaced in philosophy, in theology, in history, in the history of art, and in art criticism from antiquity to the present era.

ARHI 4562 – Art and the Second World War (4 Credits)
This course will consider the relationship between art and war with particular focus on the artistic and cultural production in Europe, North America, and Asia during the Second World War.