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Current Upper Level Courses

Rose Hill - Fall 2018

ARHI 2221 – Japanese Visual Culture (4 credits)
An examination of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to contemporary society. Issues and material explored: the development and spread of Buddhism, temple art and architecture, narrative art and prints, the interaction of art and popular culture, manga, anime, and contacts with western society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. 

ARHI 2365 – Medieval Art & the Museum (4 credits)
In this course you will learn about the history of medieval art (ca. 400-1500); study the history of museums in Europe and the US, with a focus on medieval exhibitions; and consider the meanings medieval art holds for viewers in this country, where every royal or liturgical object serves as a relic of a geographically and temporally remote past. Site visits. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ARHI 2510 – 18th Century Art (4 credits)
The development, dominance and decline of the international rococo style in painting and sculpture will be examined with special attention devoted to Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, Chardin, Tiepolo, Canaletto, Guardi and Gainsborough. A study of the enlightenment sensibility and the rise of Neo-Classicism will follow Hogarth, Reynolds and David, among others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ARHI 4230. – Art and Ethics: Articulating Function in the Visual Arts (4 Credits)
This course will examine the inter-disciplinary dialogue between art and ethics. What exactly do the terms "art" and "ethics" denote... and connote? Can one nudge the terms together into some kind of binary concept, like "ethical art" or "artful morality" (!)? Or do these terms relate at some other, deeper level, with a common ontological foundation? In the course of the semester, we will consider the relationship between art and ethics, as they have surfaced in philosophy, in theology, in history, in the history of art, and in art criticism from antiquity to the present era. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ARHI 4600– Senior Seminar (4 credits)
As the capstone seminar for art history majors, this seminar has several goals: to give art history majors an introduction to the principal thinkers who shaped the field of art history; to explore some of the key methodological approaches to art history today; to hone students’ skills in critical reading and viewing; and to provide students the opportunity to conduct independent research on an art historical topic of their own choosing. Offered fall semesters only; required for majors. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. 


Lincoln Center - Fall 2018

ARHI 2320 –  The Fall of Rome: A Material Culture Investigation (4 Credits)
An interdisciplinary investigation of the period ca. 300—800 AD. The traditional model of Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" will be considered in the light of modern conceptions of "Late Antiquity" by scholars such as Peter Brown, who see this as a period of sometimes dramatic cultural and political transformation, defined by the growth of the vibrant new kingdoms of Western Europe, and the development of Christianity and Islam. Using the methodologies of Ancient History, Archaeology, Art History and Classics, the course will consider these two approaches through the lens of material culture. How and why did cities, sculpture, religious art, pottery, textiles, military equipment and luxury goods change during this period, and what do they all reveal about how and why Rome fell—if it did at all?.

ARHI 2571 - Topics in Modern Art (4 credits) NEW COURSE
How do we talk about abstract art, and how does it communicate with us? This course examines key movements and artists—from Wassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian, and Mark Rothko to Sam Gilliam, Sherrie Levine, and Loie Hollowell—with a particular focus on abstraction’s cultural and intellectual contexts in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will examine nonrepresentational art’s relationship to art history as well as its political, technical, and spiritual motivations.

ARHI 4100 – Contemporary Art in Exhibition (4 Credits)
Using the art galleries, museums and artists’ studios in New York City as field sites, this course provides an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of contemporary art and exhibition design. In recent decades, enormous shifts have occurred in exhibition practices as art itself changed from projected images on the walls of the museum, to temporary installations outdoors, and eventually into virtual reality. We will study an array of contemporary exhibition practices and sites in their social and historical contexts, including the temporary exhibition, museum installations, art fairs, international biennials, and websites. During the seminar, we will examine how issues such as patronage, the art market, globalization, identity politics, and environmental and social justice issues have progressively brought museums and other exhibition spaces into question. We will be meeting with a range of artists and art professionals. During the term students will create a virtual exhibition. The process of building this online exhibition will equip students with several skills, including writing for a public audience, the creation of effective and informative wall labels and educational programming, visual and digital literacy, and a basic understanding of copyright law and fair use guidelines


Spring 2019 - Rose Hill

ARHI 2257 – Modern Latin American Art (4 credits)
This course looks at two great shaping forces of modern Latin American Art: nationalism, which called on visual art to both create a national identity and to reflect it; and modernism, an aesthetic movement that insisted on artistic autonomy. In more recent years, the political integrity of Latin American nations has been challenged by oppressive governments and imperialism, leading artists to seek new ways of expressing ideas and identity within and beyond the national sphere. We will also be seizing the many opportunities that New York offers to see Latin American art first hand at sites that include El Museo del Barrio, Sotheby's, and the Cecilia de Torres Gallery as well as among Latin American immigrant communities in the Bronx.

ARHI 2530 – 19th Century Art (4 credits)
This course examines the relationship between art and modernity in nineteenth-century France, beginning with the age of revolutions and culminating in the rise of Impressionism and the avant-garde. We will explore experiments in painting, sculpture, photography, and print, as well as changing cultures of exhibition, spectacle, and display, Special attention will be paid to themes of industrialization, imperialism, capitalism, and transnational exchange — forces and phenomena that continue to inform our world today. Artists studied will include Jacques-Louis David, Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun, Théodore Géricault, Charles Cordier, Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Berthe Morisot, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Edgar Degas, and Paul Cézanne.

ARHI 2562 – Art & Fascism (4 credits) NEW COURSE
This course will study the artistic and cultural production of global fascism, focusing on Italy, Germany, and Japan between the 1920s and the early 1940s. Central issues to our course are the definition of fascism; the relationship between modernity/modernism and fascism; the relationship between aesthetics/style and political ideology, race, and gender. Students will become familiar with a wide range of artistic/cultural works from painting to theater, crafts, literature, and film, and read scholarship that employs diverse disciplinary approaches (history, philosophy, film studies, art history, design, literature, education, and psychology).

ARHI 3200 – Museum Studies in Ancient Art (4 credits)
This class examines the display of Ancient Art using the collection at Fordham as a foundation. The class considers the aesthetic issues of exhibiting ancient objects and addresses the ethical concerns of collecting “un-provenanced” antiquities.

ARHI 3350 – Age of Cathedrals (4 credits)
Gothic cathedrals were the skyscrapers of the Middle Ages. These impossibly tall and profusely decorated buildings were center-points for urban life in northern Europe between ca. 1150 and 1400. This course explores the architectural innovations behind the Gothic style as well as the extensive adornment of Gothic structures – sculpture, stained glass – and objects that were used in them — illuminated manuscripts, reliquaries —  in relation to their sacred, political, social, and economic meanings.

Spring 2019 - Lincoln Center

ARHI 2450 –  17th Century Art (4 Credits)
This course surveys artistic developments in Europe in the Seventeenth Century and their relationship to the shifting political and intellectual landscape. The art of the Baroque is characterized by an interest in emotional appeal, visual immediacy, and the articulation of power. Major artists include Caravaggio, Bernini, Velázquez, Rubens, Poussin, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. The themes we will explore include the relationship of art production and reception to the political and religious environment, the development of national styles, the intersection of art, nature and science, and the emergence of academies as systems for artistic training and political control. In addition to introducing students to the visual arts of the Seventeenth Century, this course will emphasize the critical analysis of works of art and of art-historical scholarship.

ARHI 2520 – American Art (4 Credits)
This course will examine the development of American painting, sculpture and architecture from colonial times to the early 20th century, with an emphasis on painting. Major artists will be discussed in depth along with a penetrating analysis of contemporary historical conditions (Copley, West, Allston, Cole, Church, Bierstadt, Mount, Bingham, Homer, Eakins, Cassatt, O'Keeffe and others).

ARHI 3555 – Contemporary Art (4 Credits)
This course will examine art produced within the last 50 years. We will explore a variety of artistic practices including relational aesthetics, identity politics, immersive environments, institutional critique, and contemporary painting focusing on thematic through-lines such as history, temporality, community, process, audience, parafiction, and subjectivity. Significant exhibitions from this timeframe as well as major contemporary exhibitions on view in New York will also be emphasized. 

ARHI 4230. – Art and Ethics: Articulating Function in the Visual Arts (4 Credits)
This course will examine the inter-disciplinary dialogue between art and ethics. What exactly do the terms "art" and "ethics" denote... and connote? Can one nudge the terms together into some kind of binary concept, like "ethical art" or "artful morality" (!)? Or do these terms relate at some other, deeper level, with a common ontological foundation? In the course of the semester, we will consider the relationship between art and ethics, as they have surfaced in philosophy, in theology, in history, in the history of art, and in art criticism from antiquity to the present era. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.