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Aug. 10, 2020 Update Fordham Forward, the plan to resume in-person teaching and learning on Aug. 26, is available below, along with extensive resources for students, parents, faculty, and staff. Full Details

Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity

Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity is a field of study for doctoral training that enables students to understand the encounters of Jews and Christians with other cultures of the Greco-Roman world.

Fordham’s program promotes immersion in the rich diversity of ancient communities and traditions, from the Levant and Asia Minor to North Africa and Rome. It provides advanced instruction in the methods, issues, and resources of Second Temple Judaism, New Testament, Rabbinics, and early Christian studies. Our faculty members embrace interdisciplinary research into literary sources, material artifacts, and ritual practices in order to explore theological themes and diverse constructions of identity.

Required Coursework
As part of the 12 courses required of all Ph.D. students in theology, students are required to take specific survey courses in Ancient Judaism and the Greco-Roman World. Students are especially encouraged to take Advanced Greek courses each semester they are offered, along with other ancient language offerings.

Language Requirements
All students in this field of study are required to pass exams in four languages prior to sitting for their Comprehensive Examinations: French, German, Ancient Greek, and ordinarily Latin or Hebrew (Biblical or Rabbinic).

Comprehensive Exams
Students select two exams from this field of study’s three options:

  • Ancient Judaism
  • Ante-Nicene Christianity
  • Greco-Roman World

Students also select a third “minor” exam from the other fields of study (Bible, History of Christianity, Systematic Theology, Theological and Social Ethics) and then create a fourth dissertation area exam in consultation with their mentor.

Dissertation
In dissertation research, students are encouraged to push the current boundaries of topics and methods in their chosen fields. Our faculty members embrace research into practices and artifacts, as well as the customary literary sources, in order to explore theological themes and diverse constructions of social identity.

Core Faculty
George Demacopoulos
Benjamin Dunning
Emanuel Fiano
Sarit Kattan Gribetz
Karina Martin Hogan
Joseph Lienhard, SJ
Michael Peppard
Larry Welborn

Also from Classics and Art History

Matthew McGowan>: Latin literature, Greek and Roman religion
Cristiana Sogno>: Latin literature, Roman history, late antiquity
Richard Teverson>: Roman Art, Hellenistic Art, the art of Rome’s allies
Jennifer Udell>: Latin literature, Greek and Roman religion