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English Graduate Alumni

Olivia Badoi

Olivia Badoi, Ph.D.

B.A., University of Bucharest
M.A., Wroclaw University
Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: 20th-Century American

Contact
obadoi@fordham.edu


Felisa Baynes-Ross, Ph.D.

B.A., Albertus Magnus College
M.A., Southern Connecticut
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: Medieval

Contact
fbaynes@fordham.edu


Anna BeskinPh.D.
Field of Study: Medieval
International fellowship coordinator


Jamie Bolker - 2016 Winterthur Fellowship Winner

Jamie Bolker, Ph.D.

B.A., Marquette University
M.A., Marquette University
Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: Early American

Courses Taught
Composition and Rhetoric II

Dissertation Title
Lost and Found: Wayfinding in Early American Literature

Dissertation Description
My dissertation explores the relationship between human identity and navigation (wayfinding), from the time of the colonists to the publication of Henry David’s Thoreau’s landmark Walden in 1854. Examining narratives of colonial women travelers, shipwrecked sailors, frontiersmen, fugitive slaves, and surveyors, my dissertation argues that getting lost privileges a sense of selfhood that relies upon the autonomy of nature, rather than the mastery of it.

Contact
jbolker1@fordham.edu


Malkah Bressler

Malkah Bressler, Ph.D.

B.A., University of Chicago
M.A., University of Chicago
Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: 18th-Century British and Transatlantic

Courses Taught
Composition II

Dissertation Title
Ecologies of the Novel: The British novel in Caribbean narratives

Dissertation Description
My dissertation explores the ways in which conventions of the novel - things like the picaresque, the sentimental, and the gothic - make their way into mid and late eighteenth-century Caribbean travel narratives and journals. These conventions allow Caribbean texts to challenge the social conventions of plantation society and offer a different view of the Caribbean, one in which slaves are featured as individuals with agency and one in which the boundaries between humans and animals begin to blur.

Contact
mbressler1@fordham.edu


Steven Bruso

Steven Bruso, Ph.D.

B.A., Westfield State University
M.A., Clark University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: Medieval

Courses Taught
Composition I
Composition II
Texts and Contexts: Return From Avalon, King Arthur in the Middle Ages
Texts and Contexts: Masculinities, Violence, and Medieval Literature

Dissertation Title
Knightly Male Bodies and Violence in Middle English Romance

Dissertation Description
Steven's dissertation explores the social significance of developed male bodies in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and argues that representations of knightly physicality in late medieval England are the vehicle for expressing anxieties about militarized bodies. His study begins with an analysis of two popular didactic texts, Knyghthode and Battaile and Secreta Secretorum, before closely analyzing three Middle English romances: the anonymous Sir Gowther, Chaucer's Knight's Tale, and Malory's Morte D'Arthure, in order to understand how and why that body and identity could register as both desirable and frightening to medieval audiences.

Contact
sbruso@fordham.edu
https://fordham.academia.edu/StevenBruso
@StevenBruso
www.stevenbruso.com
LinkedIn


Vernita Burrell, Ph.D.

B.A., Hunter College, CUNY
M.A., Loyola Marymount University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2016)

Field of Study: 18th-Century British

Contact
vburrell@fordham.edu


Alexis Butzner

Alexis Butzner, Ph.D.

B.A., Eugene Lang College
M.A., Portland State
MPhil, Fordham
Ph.D., Fordham University (2016)

Field of Study: Early Modern

Courses Taught
Composition I
Composition II
Texts and Contexts: Bad Doctors: Magic, Learning, and Science in Early Modern Literature
Texts and Contexts: Morbid Desires: Death and Literature
Texts and Contexts: Human/Nature: Relating to the Natural World
Texts and Contexts: Staging Tragedy

Dissertation Title
Practice Imperfect: The Struggle for Health in Early Modern English Literature

Dissertation Description
My dissertation considers the various ways authors represent illness and dying in their work, with particular emphasis on how texts work both with and against practical models for attaining and maintaining health.

Contact
abutzner@fordham.edu
https://fordham.academia.edu/AlexisButzner
https://alexisbutzner.wordpress.com/


Leslie Carpenter

Leslie Carpenter, Ph.D.

B.A., Maryville University
M.A., Fordham University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2018)

Field of Study: Medieval

Courses Taught
Composition I and II
Texts and Contexts: Fairy Tales
Texts and Contexts: Knights at the Movies
Texts and Contexts: Arthur Through the Ages

Dissertation Title
Pointing Rhythm and Rhyme: Punctuating Verse in post-Conquest England

Dissertation Description
My work focuses on the changes of metrical form, manuscript layout, and punctuation in 11th through 13th century vernacular English poetry, bringing attention to the interplay between versification and scribal practices.

Contact
lecarpenter@fordham.edu
https://fordham.academia.edu/LeslieCarpenter


Clarissa Chenovick

Clarissa Chenovick, Ph.D.

B.A., Bryn Mawr College
M.Phil., Cambridge University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: Late Medieval and Early Modern Literature

Courses Taught
Composition I 
Composition II  
Texts and Contexts: Bleeding Hearts

Dissertation Title
Repentant Readers: Medical Discourses and Spiritual Self-Shaping in Late Medieval and Early Modern England

Dissertation Description
My dissertation examines the use of medical discourses in Pre- and Post-Reformation penitential writings – personal meditations, allegorical narratives, sermons, poems – in order to elucidate how devout people in both periods used reading as a means of reforming body and soul. This project gives special attention to under-used archival sources that bear witness to individual penitential reading practices.

Contact
cchenovick@fordham.edu


Anthony Michael D'Agostino, Ph.D.

B.A., Sarah Lawrence College
M.A., NYU
JD, Fordham Law
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: The Victorian Novel, Queer Theory, Critical Theory, Feminism, Speculative Fiction, Law and Literature

Courses Taught
Composition II
Texts and Contexts: Telepathy in Literature

Dissertation Title
Queer Privilege: Reading Telepathy in the Victorian Novel

Dissertation Description
My dissertation analyzes depictions of mind-to-mind contact, feeling at a distance, and thought-reading in the mid-to-late Victorian Novel as tropes and strategies of queer identification and desire.

Contact
adagostino@fordham.edu


Will Fenton

William Fenton, Ph.D.

B.A., Rollins College
MA and MPhil, Fordham University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2018)

Field of Study: Early American

Courses Taught
Composition II

Dissertation Title
Unpeaceable Kingdom: Fighting Quakers, Revolutionary Violence, and the Antebellum Novel

Dissertation Description
My dissertation examines the discrepancy between fictional representations of fighting Quakers and their historical practices of pacifism and political participation.

Contact
fenton@fordham.edu


Patricia Grisafi

Patricia Grisafi, Ph.D.

B.A., Skidmore College
M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: 20th-Century American

Courses Taught
Composition I
Composition II
Texts and Contexts: Horror and the Gothic Representations of Mental Illness
Countercultures and Bohemians
Texts and Contexts: Modern American Novel

Dissertation Title
The Sexualization of Mental Illness in Postwar American Literature

Contact
grisafi@fordham.edu
www.patriciagrisafi.com


Caroline Hagood

Caroline Hagood, Ph.D.

B.A., Vassar College
M.A., SUNY Buffalo
Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: 20th Century American

Courses Taught
Composition II
Texts and Contexts: Writers Who Like to Watch--Beat Writers and Film

Dissertation Title
Women Who Like to Watch: 20th Century American Cinema Poetry

Dissertation Description
The project follows female poets responding to, and revising, the work of male filmmakers, and it pays special attention to the effects of cinematic theme and form on the poetry of H.D., Adrienne Rich, and Theresa Cha.

Contact
chagood@fordham.edu
http://www.carolinehagood.com

Lunatic Speaks
Making Maxine's Baby


Sharon Harris

Sharon Harris, Ph.D.

BM, Brigham Young University
M.A., University of Chicago
Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: Early Modern; Music and Sound Studies

Courses Taught
Composition II
Texts & Contexts: Shakespeare in London
Texts & Contexts: What is the Song Saying? Hermeneutics of Music and Its Texts
Texts & Contexts: Lyric and Lyrics, Music and English Poetry from the Medieval Period to Milton

Dissertation Title
Songs and Sonnets, Cries and Concerts: Music that Moves in Early Modern England

Contact
sharris29@fordham.edu
Curriculum Vitae


Rachael Faith HilliardRachael Hilliard, Ph.D.

B.A., Cornell University
M.A., University of York (UK)
Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: Early Modern

Courses Taught
Composition and Rhetoric I and II
Texts and Contexts: Bad Boys: Renaissance Villains
Texts and Contexts: Bad Boys: Renaissance Sonneteers

Dissertation Title
Changing Modes of Encounter in Shakespearean Adaptation: The New Digital Audience

Dissertation Description
Her dissertation considers recent mediatized adaptations of three plays: a Twitter Romeo and Juliet, a Google+ A Midsummer Night's Dream, and an immersive self-driven Macbeth (Punchdrunk's "Sleep No More").

Contact
rhilliard@fordham.edu
Work Mobile: 347-559-1623


Mahlika Hopwood

Mahlika Hopwood, Ph.D.

B.A., Arizona State University
M.A., Arizona State University
Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Theology

Courses Taught
Composition II
Texts and Contexts: The Spiritual Journey
Texts and Contexts: Imagination and Reality

Dissertation Title
God, Self, and Fellow: Community in the Religious Literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Dissertation Description
Mahlika's dissertation argues for the presence and relevance of human community within religious spaces of ostensible solitude.

Contact
mhopwood@fordham.edu


Melissa Hurwitz, Ph.D.

B.A., University of Delaware
M.S.J., Northwestern
M.S., Hunter College
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: 19th-Century British; Romanticism

Courses Taught
Composition II

Dissertation Title
Dispossessed Women: Female Homelessness in Romantic Literature

Dissertation Description
This work examines the real-life reception and literary representation of female vagrants at a point in history when females out numbered men two to one in terms of homelessness. The project surveys various genres to examine how vagrant women were treated by authors as the tides of vagrant populations continued to rise after a century of famine, war, and displacement due to enclosure and industrialization. The project begins with Mary Robinson’s lyric response to Wordsworth’s “The Female Vagrant”—a point of problematic sympathy for the homeless female—and ends with Robert Southey’s nasty treatment of the vagrant woman who originally invaded the cottage in “The Story of the Three Bears.”

Contact
mhurwitz@fordham.edu


Boyda JohnstoneBoyda Johnstone, Ph.D.

B.A., University of Calgary
M.A., University of Calgary
Ph.D., Fordham University (2016)

Field of Study: Medieval

Courses Taught
Composition I: Writing Culture 
Composition II
Texts and Contexts: Dreaming in Literature from the Medieval to the Modern 
Advanced Disciplinary Study: Dreamers and Visionaries in Medieval Literature

Dissertation Title
Immersive Reading: Dreamers and Their Books in Late Medieval England

Dissertation Description
Johnstone's dissertation examines the groundswell of interest in dreams and visions between the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries in England, arguing that the multivalent realm of dreaming offered readers renewed and sometimes controversial ways of approaching their everyday lives. Her chapters span the diverse materials of dream interpretation guides, literary dream visions, apocalypse manuscripts and illustrations, and the medium of stained glass in an effort to get closer to an understanding of what dreaming meant to medieval people.

Contact
bjohnstone1@fordham.edu
Curriculum Vitae


Richard Moore Jr., Ph.D.

B.A., Binghamton University
M.A., Binghamton University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2018)

Field of Study: 18th-Century British

Courses Taught
Composition II

Dissertation Title
Future Visions to Racial Apparitions: Changing Dreams in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Gothic Novels

Dissertation Description
My dissertation explores shifts in how dreams dramatize and at times satirize political anxieties concerning Great Britain's internal and external conflicts.

Contact
rmoore11@fordham.edu


Peter Murray, Ph.D.

B.A., Clark University
M.A., Clark University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2018)

Field of Study: 20th-Century British; Postcolonial

Contact
pmurray24@fordham.edu


Kate NashPh.D.
Field of Study: 20th-Century British


Martin NorthropMartin Northrop, Ph.D.

B.A., Colgate University
M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: 20th-Century American

Courses Taught
Composition I
Composition II
Texts and Contexts:
Reading Underworlds
Crime in American Fiction and Film
Friendship as a Way of Life
Literary Bromance
American Writers in Paris
Post-1945 American Literature and Culture

Dissertation Title
Booked: Sexuality and Taste in American Crime Fiction

Contact
mnorthrop@fordham.edu


David Pedersen student spotlightDavid Pedersen, Ph.D.

B.A., Nebraska-Lincoln
MSEd, Lehman College-CUNY
M.A., York, UK
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: Medieval

Courses Taught
Composition II

Dissertation Title
Conceptualizing the Inconceivable in Anglo-Saxon Wisdom Texts 

Dissertation Description
His dissertation, tentatively titled "Conceptualizing the Inconceivable in Anglo-Saxon Wisdom Texts," focuses on the effect of language and of cultural history on Christian subjectivity in Anglo-Saxon England. This project explores what it meant to an Anglo-Saxon in the century following the Alfredian Renaissance to self-identify as a Christian by examining the ways that Old English adaptations of Latin Christian philosophical and theological texts differ conceptually from the originals. David hopes, with this project, to challenge the monolithic definition of "Christian" that informs much of the modern scholarship on early medieval English Christianity.

Contact
dpedersen@fordham.edu


Liz Porter

Elizabeth Porter, Ph.D.

B.A., Adelphi University
M.A., Fordham University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: 18th-Century British

Courses Taught
Disobedience in Literature
Texts and Contexts: Novel Heroines and Heroes
Texts and Contexts: Travels and Novels
Texts and Contexts: Servants in Literature

Dissertation Title
The Urban Plunge: Eighteenth-Century Novel Heroines in London

Dissertation Description
The project investigates a trend in long eighteenth-century novels: heroines visiting or relocating to the London metropolis. Each chapter focuses on a particular female-centered novel, paying special attention to shifting representations of urban space and perception, promises and perils of female mobility, and relationships among women from different social classes.   

Contact
eporter3@fordham.edu


Christy Pottroff

Christy L. Pottroff, Ph.D.

B.S., Kansas State University
M.A., Kansas State University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: Early American

Courses Taught
LGBT Literature
Honors Integrated Writing Intensive Course
Honors Public Speaking
Composition II

Dissertation Title
Citizen Technologies: The U.S. Post Office and the Transformation of Early American Literature

Dissertation Description
At the heart of my dissertation is the premise that the U.S. Post Office Department--the nation’s first comprehensive social network and informational infrastructure--gave early Americans a way to understand national union. Not only did this early systematization of communication have a profound impact on textual circulation, but I argue that contemporary authors used representations of the postal system to negotiate the problems and promises of national union within their works. Each chapter draws upon the postal archive to argue for a range of intersections between the mail and the book. Building on recent work in print culture and temporality studies, my project draws out the geographical and temporal specifics of early American mail delivery, and theorizes how these underexamined material factors might differently orient scholars toward the study of early American literature.

Contact
cpottroff@fordham.edu
www.christypottroff.com


Samantha Sabalis, Ph.D.

M.A., University of St. Andrews
MPhil, Trinity College Dublin
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: Late Medieval Literature

Courses Taught
Composition II
Texts and Contexts, Caught in a Bad Romance: Magic, Quests, Gothic Prisons and the Development of the Romance Mode
Texts and Contexts, Medieval Sin and Virtue

Dissertation Title
Pastoral Education in England and Its Impact on Fifteenth-Century Literary Culture

Dissertation Description
My dissertation focuses on how female and middle-class audiences engaged with texts of religious instruction in fifteenth-century England. I examine how these texts gave such readers spiritual and political authority, allowing them to share the Church’s role of teaching the faith and giving them more universal, Christian definitions of the political virtues of prudence and justice that made these virtues relevant to a wider audience than the ruling class.

Contact
ssabalis@fordham.edu
https://fordham.academia.edu/SamanthaSabalis


Kevin StevensKevin Stevens, Ph.D.

B.A., Seton Hall University
M.A., MPhil, Fordham University

Field of Study: 19th-Century British

Courses Taught
Composition/Rhetoric I
Composition/Rhetoric II
Texts and Contexts: Sounds of the Nineteenth Century

Dissertation Title
Hearing Unreliable Narration: Noise in the Nineteenth-Century British Novel

Contact
kstevens7@fordham.edu


Kara StonePh.D.
Field of Study: Medieval


Judith Stuchiner

Judith Stuchiner, Ph.D.

B.A., Grinnell College
M.A., Columbia University
Ph.D., Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: 18th-Century British

Courses Taught
Composition I
Composition II
Texts and Contexts

Dissertation Title
Religious Enthusiasm and the British Worker, from Henry Fielding to George Eliot 

Dissertation Description
Her dissertation views the novel through the lens of major philosophical debates, such as revelation versus reason and faith versus works.  Essentially, Judith treats the rising novel as a spiritual space for self-definition, both from the perspective of a servant, such as Fielding’s Joseph Andrews, or an artisan, such as Eliot’s Adam Bede, during a time when religion, though central, offered an increasingly confusing proliferation of philosophical world views. 

Contact
jstuchiner@fordham.edu


English Graduate Student Profile Picture

James Van Wyck, Ph.D.

B.A., William Paterson University
M.A., SUNY Buffalo
Ph.D., Fordham University (2016)

Field of Study: 19th-Century American

Courses Taught
Composition I
Composition II
Texts and Contexts: God & NYC
Honors Writing Intensive
Honors Rhetoric and Public Speaking

Dissertation Title
Reading Minds, Bodies, and Souls: Nineteenth-Century Evangelical Fiction and Its Legacy

Dissertation Description
His dissertation examines the relationship between U.S. evangelical fiction and the life of the mind in the nineteenth century.

Contact
jvanwyck@fordham.edu
Twitter: @jmvanwyck


Charlotte WillisPh.D.
Field of Study: Modern American


Jordan WindholzPh.D.
Field of Study: Early Modern


Jonathan Wolf, Ph.D.
Fordham University (2017)

Field of Study: Modern American

Contact
jowolf@fordham.edu


Mira Sengupta

Mira Zaman, Ph.D. 

B.A., Barnard College, Columbia
M.A., City College, CUNY
Ph.D., Fordham University

Field of Study: 18th-Century British

Courses Taught
Composition II

Dissertation Title
Devilish Thoughts: Echoes of Satanic Persuasion in the 18th-Century Novel

Dissertation Description
Her dissertation examines the rhetoric of characters who invoke Satan’s deceptive tactics, while also investigating how satanic forces shape cognitive processes. Mira studies satanic persuasion in the Enlightenment novel in an effort to refine current definitions of secularity.

Contact
msengupta@fordham.edu