About the Center for Community Engaged Learning

Fordham students walking on campus.

Mission

To bridge Fordham University with our neighboring communities and global partners through experiential learning, research, and civic engagement. 

Vision

To engage every member of the University as active citizens in the alleviation of poverty, the promotion of justice, the protection of human rights, and respect for the environment.

Values

  • Experiential learning for social justice

  • Asset-based community development

  • Anti-racist pedagogies

  • Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm

  • Catholic Social Teaching

  • Student success

CEL Learning Objectives

Introductory Courses and Programs

  1. To develop an understanding of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD).
  2. To be introduced to the living history of community organizing, advocacy, and development in the city of New York. 
  3. To understand and appreciate the effect of participation in community engagement on personal and spiritual growth and development, and on interpersonal relations. 
  4. To advance a commitment to global citizenship by understanding the relationship between community-based work into community-based work in other local, national, and international places and spaces, especially in response to the following global issues:
    1. Education access
    2. Migration justice
    3. Food insecurity
    4. Environmental sustainability.
  5. To understand the impact of community engagement projects or initiatives on their intended communities through reflection that is oriented towards lifelong discernment and commitment to the common good. 

Intermediate/Advanced Courses and Programs

  1. To develop an understanding of and gain hands-on experience practicing Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD).
  2. To achieve a working proficiency with the living history of community organizing, advocacy, and development in the city of New York, and to locate the community engagement project in that history. 
  3. To situate and understand participation in community engagement in terms of personal and spiritual growth and development, interpersonal relations, and the social, political, and economic structures that either uphold or undermine social justice and human rights.  
  4. To advance a commitment to global citizenship by engaging in initiatives that relate community-based work in New York to community-based work in other local, national, and international places and spaces, especially in response to the following global issues:
    1. Education access
    2. Migration justice
    3. Food insecurity
    4. Environmental sustainability
  5. To research, track, and analyze the impact of community engagement projects on their intended communities in tandem with reflective practices oriented towards lifelong discernment and commitment to the common good.