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UCSC Program

Students on the Rose Hill Campus love being Rams

Fordham is eager to welcome students from the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore.

You can choose classes in any session:

Session I: May 31 - June 30, includes synchronous class meetings
Session II: July 5 - August 4, includes synchronous class meetings
Session III: May 31 - August 4, asynchronous courses with no live sessions

Program Benefits

As a Fordham student for the summer, you will have access to all Fordham University online resources, including tutoring and library facilities, and you will have the benefit of meeting and networking with Fordham faculty and students. You will have an international experience without having to leave your home town.

Please refer to the program description on your university website and feel free to contact your international office at info.outbound@unicatt.it with questions.

Course selection

UCSC students are eligible to take any undergraduate course that fits with their program of study. Here we list courses that might work best with Central European Time (CET) for your convenience. Elsewhere on our website, courses will be listed in Eastern Standard Time (EST).

Anthropology

ANTH 1100 L11 Introduction To Cultural Anthropology
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and the family, adaptions to the environment and to political, economic and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures.


ANTH 1100 L21 Introduction To Cultural Anthropology
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and the family, adaptions to the environment and to political, economic and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures.


ANTH 1200 L21 Introduction To Physical Anthropology
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online Lab: M, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

This introduction to physical (or biological) anthropology satisfies a core life science requirement and serves as a general survey of the biological focus of anthropology. The course summarizes the different areas of physical anthropology and covers the history of evolutionary theories, human genetics and adaptation, primate biology, behavioral ecology and conservation, and an extensive overview of the human fossil record. In particular, we emphasize the variations found in non-human primates and the biological and cultural changes that took place in our ancestors over the past 6.8 million years. Lab sessions will provide a practical introduction to human osteology, primate morphology, primate conservation, and comparisons of human fossil morphology.


ANTH 1200 L21 Introduction To Physical Anthropology
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online Lecture: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

This introduction to physical (or biological) anthropology satisfies a core life science requirement and serves as a general survey of the biological focus of anthropology. The course summarizes the different areas of physical anthropology and covers the history of evolutionary theories, human genetics and adaptation, primate biology, behavioral ecology and conservation, and an extensive overview of the human fossil record. In particular, we emphasize the variations found in non-human primates and the biological and cultural changes that took place in our ancestors over the past 6.8 million years. Lab sessions will provide a practical introduction to human osteology, primate morphology, primate conservation, and comparisons of human fossil morphology.


ANTH 1500 R21 Introduction To Fashion and Culture
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This introductory lecture course is required for students pursuing the fashion studies minor. In this class, students will be introduced to cultural and media studies concepts that will equip them with the theoretical and methodological tools necessary to explore fashion as a historically situated and context-dependent form of communication and meaning-making. The course considers the implications of fashion within systems of power, everyday acts of self-presentation, and larger politics of representation.


ANTH 2619 L21 Magic Science and Religion
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Magic, science and religion will be analyzed, compared and contrasted. Problems in the comparative study of these topics, especially of religion, the "supernatural," and world view, are discussed in the context of various cultures.


ANTH 2700 R11 You Are What You Eat
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

As the center of all significant human rituals and ceremonies, food is studied by a range of natural and social scientists. For the anthropologist, food is connected to the human body, health social relations, identity, and even ideology; we are literally what we eat. This course examines the role food plays in shaping cultural practices throughout the world. Students will explore changing concepts of food through time, beginning with early humans, modes of food production, and consumption. Through primary literature, lectures, local ethnic markets, and sharing meals throughout the semester, this class will immerse you in the theoretical and empirical significance of the cross-cultural significance of food. Bon appetit!


ANTH 2886 L11 Anthropology Of Gender And Sexuality
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Are sex roles biologically determined or culturally defined? A cross-cultural perspective provides a unique opportunity to explore answers to this question through an examination of the roles of men and women in marriage and the family and in economic, political and religious institutions, as well as how such roles are interrelated with conceptions of masculinity, femininity, honor and shame.


ANTH 3385 R21 Post Apocalyptic Societies
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Humans have a long fascination with cataclysmic events. This course will use post-apocalyptic fiction as ethnography to examine the processes and forms of culture change in the wake of catastrophic events such as nuclear war, viral epidemics, and alien invasions. Using popular culture, we will study how humans adapt to the loss of the familiar structures that shape their lives, and will seek to develop a broad understanding of human cultural formation through these cases of its complete annihilation. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Art History and Music

MUSC 1100 L11 Introduction to Music History: African-American Musical Traditions and Jazz
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

This course explores a variety of musical styles and practices from the late 1800s to the present, with special emphasis on West African musical genres, spirituals, blues, and, with its variety of styles, jazz. These styles and traditions are examined as political and cultural texts as a narrative of African American musical identity. No previous knowledge of music is required.


MUSC 1100 L12 Introduction to Music History: Western Traditions
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 4-7 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

This course presents a survey of music history, with a focus on developing the skills of thinking and writing critically about music. Students will learn to listen in a focused way and relate what they hear to issues of musical “meaning” and general culture. Students will learn some technical vocabulary that will help them describe or advocate for any music they encounter, and they will apply this vocabulary to examples throughout the semester, for instance, a Beethoven Symphony or a Duke Ellington jazz arrangement. Sections may have different focuses in terms of geography or chronology.

Business, Finance, and Accounting,

ACBU 2223 R21 Principles of Managerial Accounting 
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

This course covers how to measure and use cost data for internal decision making under uncertainty. Among the topics covered are job costing, process costing, standard costing, activity-based costing, budgeting, balanced scorecard, direct versus indirect cost measures, cost volume profit analysis, and management control systems.


BLBU 3436 R11 Commercial Transactions
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

This course completes the legal background of the student and considers the commercial issues in the law of sales, bailments, suretyship, negotiable instruments, insurance, creditor's rights, and bankruptcy.


CBBU 1001 R21 The Ground Floor
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

This course introduces first-year students to business, to student-focused resources at Fordham, and to personal skills that contribute to success at GSB and beyond. Teamwork and critical thinking are emphasized to encourage students to develop an integrated perspective of business functions. 


CMBU 2665 L21 Business Communication
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

This course offers a chance to improve basic competency in written and verbal business communication skills. The ability to communicate well is crucial to career success. Corporate cultures, international communications, conversational strategies, timed writing, interviewing, problem-solving, business style are discussed.


CMBU 2665 PW1 Business Communication
Session III: June 1-August 5
Online: Asynchronous

3 credits

This course offers a chance to improve basic competency in written and verbal business communication skills. The ability to communicate well is crucial to career success. Corporate cultures, international communications, conversational strategies, timed writing, interviewing, problem-solving, business style are discussed.


FNBU 3440 L21 Corporate Financial Policy
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

From the standpoint of finance theory, the value created by a corporation depends on the profitability of investments and the mode of financing these profitable investments. This course enables students to analyze and understand the interaction between the investment and financing decisions. The course is case-oriented and covers advanced capital budgeting issues, debt-equity choice, dividend decision, investment banking, convertibles and warrants, and issues of international corporate finance.


FNBU 3441 L21 Investments & Security Analysis
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

Investing media, features, and characteristics. Security markets and their procedures. Investment risks, their recognition, and evaluation in security analysis. Problems in the analysis of data. Portfolio management techniques.


MKBU 3225 R11 Marketing Principles
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

Marketing's role within an organization is to develop products or services that have value to potential customers, to estimate that value and price accordingly to distribute the goods efficiently, and to communicate their value and availability effectively. This course introduces students to techniques and theories that help the marketer to accomplish these tasks, whether for a mom-and-pop store or a global or multinational manufacturer.


MKBU 3434 R11 Integrated Marketing Comm
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

Advertising is the most pervasive element of the marketing mix: the average American family of four is exposed to 1500 advertising messages a day! Students will study the role of advertising in the marketing communications mix, allocating the promotional budget, and developing advertising strategy: product positioning, creative development, media planning, research and control, legal issues, and ethical considerations. Students will apply theories to case discussions and develop a full-fledged competitive advertising campaign for a potential "client."


MKBU 3435 L21 Consumer Behavior
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

An interdisciplinary approach to the study of consumer behavior and motivation. Topics include behavioral science findings and their implications in the marketing mix; socioeconomics, demographic and cultural influences; theories of promotion and communication; consumer behavior models; attitude measurement; perception and consumerism.


MKBU 3440 R11 Global Marketing
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

This course addresses the need for global approaches to today's business by focusing on product design, promotion, distribution channels, and pricing strategies that are tailored to diverse international cultural, political, competitive, and economic environments. Specific attention is placed on the feasibility of import/export, and national or global policies regarding marketing issues.


OPBU 3438 R21 Operations & Production Management 
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)

3 credits

The operations function within an organization is responsible for managing the process flow that an organization has to use to produce a product, deliver a service, or both. Operations managers are responsible for the design, the daily operation, and the improvement of these processes. This course provides an introduction to the field of operations management: to understand the key decisions and to see how these decisions directly impact an organization's competitiveness and market performance.

Communication and Media Studies

COMC 1101 L21 Communication & Culture: Theory, History & Methods
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: Th, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

An introduction to the history, theory, and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This serves as the required introductory course for the major in Communication and Culture. It provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis.


COMC 2329 L21 Introduction to Media Industries
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

An overview of the mass media communication industries; examining such issues as the institutional, social, and technological histories of the media; the influence of economic factors in shaping content and issues governing regulatory policy.


COMC 3114 L11 Effective Speaking
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

A study of principles of effective communication with emphasis on the role of public speaking skills in professional life, the importance of critical thinking to communication, and its significance in a democratic political system.


COMC 3380 L21 International Communication
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Comparative study of media systems of different countries. The role of the media in the formation of the concept of nationality. Theories of communication development and the debate around the international flow of information. How the media informs us about other countries and how, through the media, we form our conception of the world.


DTEM 2443 L11 Fashion and Digital Media
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course examines what happens when one of the oldest forms of communication, fashion, meets up with the newest, digital media. Digital media has reconfigured the fashion industry: bloggers sit alongside famous magazine editors at Fashion Shows, the retail industry collapses as online shopping takes off, platforms such as Instagram reconfigure social status and power. While digital media creates new jobs, communities, celebrities, status, and power in the fashion world, it also maintains and creates new social inequalities. We will examine the relationship between fashion and digital media from three vantage points: globally, locally, and personally. Our global focus considers the ways digital media creates new networks of production/labor/people; the local unit considers new jobs and identities (such as “influencers”) in the fashion industry, with a special focus on New York City.


DTEM 2450 L11 Digital Property Rights, Policies, and Practice
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TF, 6-9 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course will provide a general overview of copyright law specific to its impact on media and entertainment institutions, online platforms, and distribution channels. The course will examine copyright subject matter, ownership, duration, rights, licensing, infringement, and fair uses with a focus, in particular, on issue-identification and other analytical skills for professionals in practice.


DTEM 2542 L11 Game Culture: Theory and Practice
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTW, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Games are everywhere and over 155 million Americans play them regularly on tabletops and electronic devices across the county. Their prevalence has prompted the medium as a space for expression, art, and meaning-making. Moving beyond the notion of simple entertainment games are creating provocative experiences to promote change or understanding. This course emphasizes exploration and critical thinking as we discover how games are designed to address issues such as social justice, gender representation, behavioral change, and education. Through analyzing game artifacts and engaging in creative exercises, students will be able to think critically about games and how they are designed. Students will apply this literacy to their own game projects. This course is open to anyone who is interested in games and their possibilities.


FITV 2425 L21 Digital Video Production I
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This introductory workshop class will teach the fundamentals of digital video production and cinematic storytelling. Students will learn concepts, techniques, and technologies pertaining to digital video and sound through hands-on production and post-production assignments. We will explore the aesthetics and the communicative potential of the medium through screenings, critiques, and exercises.


FITV 3554 L11 African American Film
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

The success of movies such as Black Panther and the popular recognition of filmmakers like Ava DuVernay and Jordan Peele suggests that we have entered a new era of African American media representation. This class will explore African American cinema from the silent era to the contemporary moment. We will discuss African American participation in the mainstream film industry as well as the robust tradition of black independent cinema. Particular attention will be paid to the intersections of black aesthetics and cultural politics on screen; representations of blackness in relation to gender, sexuality, and class; and issues of spectatorship and identification as well as stardom and performance. Looking at the past and present terrain of African American cinema, we will interrogate the fundamental concept of Black film and imagine what its future holds.


FITV 3571 R21 Science Fiction in Film and Television
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: Th, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Sociological, cultural, and psychoanalytic analysis and criticism of the science fiction genre in cinema, television, radio, print, and other media.


FITV 3648 L11 Television, Race, and Civil Rights
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-7 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised.” This was the rallying cry of Black radicals during times of national unrest, especially associated with the Black Power Movement. This course introduces students to the intersection of television, race, and civil rights broadly. How does U.S. TV engage with racial injustice and the fight for civil rights? How does the mass medium articulate pressing issues concerning the historical struggle for equality for African Americans? Students will engage with concepts in television studies as they connect to representations of racial Blackness on the small screen, paying special attention to TV texts, audiences, and industries. Topics discussed include mediations of protest, violence, and criminality in news media as well as social and political commentary in fictional programming.


NMDD 3150 L21 Creative Code
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 6:30-8:30 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course will develop programming skills used in the digital humanities, all in the context of critical and cultural media studies. Students will learn basic coding concepts such as variables, loops, graphics, and analyzing sound data, and will connect them to current debates in the culture of coding. No previous coding experience is required.

Economics

ECON 1100 L11 Basic Macroeconomics
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Investment, GDP, interest rates, the budget deficit, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, and exchange rates appear frequently in the media but are often little understood. Macroeconomics studies these aggregates and their interconnections and looks as well at the influence of the Federal Reserve and the federal government.


ECON 1100 R11 Basic Macroeconomics
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Investment, GDP, interest rates, the budget deficit, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, and exchange rates appear frequently in the media but are often little understood. Macroeconomics studies these aggregates and their interconnections and looks as well at the influence of the Federal Reserve and the federal government.


ECON 1100 R21 Basic Macroeconomics
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Investment, GDP, interest rates, the budget deficit, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, and exchange rates appear frequently in the media but are often little understood. Macroeconomics studies these aggregates and their interconnections and looks as well at the influence of the Federal Reserve and the federal government.


ECON 1200 PW1 Basic Microeconomics
Session III: June 1-August 5
Online: Asynchronous
3 credits

Microeconomics studies the decisions and interaction of consumers and businesses, resulting in an understanding of the process by which prices and quantities are determined in a market setting. Forms of industrial organization such as competition, monopoly, and oligopoly are explored. Also studied are the markets for labor and other factors of production.


ECON 1200 R11 Basic Microeconomics
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Microeconomics studies the decisions and interaction of consumers and businesses, resulting in an understanding of the process by which prices and quantities are determined in a market setting. Forms of industrial organization such as competition, monopoly, and oligopoly are explored. Also studied are the markets for labor and other factors of production.


ECON 1200 R12 Basic Microeconomics
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Microeconomics studies the decisions and interaction of consumers and businesses, resulting in an understanding of the process by which prices and quantities are determined in a market setting. Forms of industrial organization such as competition, monopoly, and oligopoly are explored. Also studied are the markets for labor and other factors of production.


ECON 2140 R12 Statistics I
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course introduces students to descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling methods, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing.


ECON 2142 PW1 Statistical Decision Making
Session III: June 1-August 5
Online: Asynchronous
4 credits

This computer-assisted course develops the student's ability to collect data, postulate a hypothesis or a model, select the appropriate statistical technique, analyze the data using statistical software, draw correct statistical inference and clearly summarize the findings. Specific topics include chi-square tests, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression and correlation models, time series analysis, and quality control.


ECON 2142 R21 Statistical Decision Making
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This computer-assisted course develops the student's ability to collect data, postulate a hypothesis or a model, select the appropriate statistical technique, analyze the data using statistical software, draw correct statistical inference and clearly summarize the findings. Specific topics include chi-square tests, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression and correlation models, time series analysis, and quality control.


ECON 3118 R11 Microtheory
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Theory of demand, price-output, equilibrium of firms under different market conditions, theory of production, and determination of factor prices.


ECON 3256 R11 Comparative Economic Systems
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Survey of the salient features of alternative economic systems; the mixed economies of the western world and Japan, the reforms in the former Soviet, Eastern European, and Chinese economies; problems of measuring economic performance.


ECON 3636 R11 Money and Banking
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

The role of commercial banks and financial institutions in the creation and allocation of money and credit; the central bank as a regulator of the money supply; monetary theory and policy; the international monetary system.


ECON 3886 R11 Machine Learning for Economists: An Introduction Using R
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course introduces students to a set of tools for modeling and understanding (possibly big) data. It blends elements from statistics/econometrics and computer science. It is therefore interdisciplinary in nature and designed for quantitatively inclined students. The course focuses on supervised learning with applications of interest, notably in economics and finance. In the first part of the course, we will define the field, discuss the meaning of model accuracy and the bias-variance trade-off, and briefly review linear regression using R. In the second part, we will extend our study of classifiers, i.e., tools to classify observations into categories, or evaluate the probability that an observation belongs to a category. For example, determining whether (and with what probability) the economy is currently in a recession is a classification problem. Methods may include the logistic regression, the naive Bayes classifier, and the K-nearest-neighbor approach. In the third part of the course, we will study resampling methods: cross-validation and the bootstrap. In the fourth and final part, we will cover more advanced topics that may include model selection and regularization, tree-based methods, or support vector machine.


ECON 4025 R11 Bronx Urban Econ Development
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

The course will use economics, urban studies, and social service policy to examine economic, political, and social issues that impact the local Bronx community. Topics covered will include budgetary policy, education policy, community development, and investment, and university/neighborhood relations, among others.

French

FREN 3625 L11 Writing for Theater
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

In this course, you will study French cinema history by focusing particularly on the "Auteur theory" and the work of world-renowned French filmmakers. Taught in French.

History

AFAM 1600 L11 History: Africa
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

This course introduces students to major themes in Africa's complex history, including early human origins; religion; trade networks; slavery and the slave trade; colonialism; and liberation struggles. We will explore Africa as an idea and field of study, by attending to the major debates that have shaped historical writing about Africa. Significant class time will be devoted to developing student writing and public speaking skills through individual and group presentations, revision writing, and peer review.


AFAM 3150 L11 Caribbean Peoples and Culture
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 4-7 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

An examination of the historical, cultural, and contemporary characteristics of various ethnic groups in the Caribbean. Special attention will be devoted to Afro-West Indians


HIST 1000 L21 History: Modern Europe
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and the examination of specific topics essential for understanding the evolution of modern institutions, ideologies, and political situations.


CLAS 1220 R21 History: Ancient Rome
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Introduction to Roman History focusing on problems and sources.


HIST 1075 L11 History: Renaissance to Revolution
Session I: June 1-July 1
Lincoln Center / Hybrid: TTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Understanding Historical Change in early modern Europe involves a modular and comparative approach to events and issues significant to the history of Europe from approximately 1500 to 1800. The course will examine a range of events stretching from Columbus's voyages to the rise of Napoleon, and issues including but not limited to religious change, state formation, intellectual development, and revolution.


HIST 1100 R21 History: American History
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.


HIST 3364 L21 Environmental History of the Atlantic World, 1250-1650
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Contemporary climate change has driven home the capacity of human societies to shape and be shaped by our environments. We are not, however, the first people to rely on fragile relationships with an ever-changing natural world. From the sequence of floods, famines, and human and animal diseases which struck Europe in the fourteenth century, linked to a minor fluctuation in global temperature, to the catastrophic transformation of American ecologies and societies with the arrival of Old World species, such relationships have defined our past. This course will explore the interactions between humans and their environment around the Atlantic basin, from the first faltering of the Medieval Warm Period in the thirteenth century, through the establishment of permanent European colonies on the North American mainland, exploring how societies were affected by changing environmental conditions, and how they tried to understand, adapt to, and shape those conditions in turn.


HIST 3430 L11 World of Queen Elizabeth
Session I: June 1-July 1
Lincoln Center / Hybrid: TTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course explores the world of Queen Elizabeth, the last Tudor sovereign, by looking at four overlapping themes that together shaped the Elizabethan period: state and society in the kingdom of England; overseas discovery; European diplomacy; and the kingdom of Ireland.

Latin

LATN 1004 R11 Intensive Latin
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MW, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

An accelerated introduction to the Latin language covering a full year of grammar in one semester. 


LATN 3061 R21 Christian Latin
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MW, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

A study of the language and literature of the late classical and early Christian eras. Taught in Latin.

Linguistics

LING 1500 L11 Intro to Psycholinguistics
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

An introduction to psycholinguistics, also called the psychology of language. The course focuses on how the mind and brain acquire and process language across the lifespan and in different populations. Taught in English.

Literatures

ENGL 3467 R21 Disobedience In Literature
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

"Of man's first disobedience" -- so begins John Milton's epic poem, PARADISE LOST. Milton was not alone in having his interest sparked: the concept of disobedience in its various permutations (literary, social, political, psychological, religious) has energized a wide variety of literary works. One might say that without some form of disobedience, there could be no storytelling. Some of the questions that will shape our explorations in this course include: when is disobedience heroic, and when is it destructive or regrettable? What is the difference between disobeying your family and disobeying the law? Can an obedient character be interesting? How are the different modes of authority (religious, juridical, familial) played off against one another in order to license behavior? Using disobedience as our guiding rubric, we will follow important continuities and innovative changes in literary history across the past three centuries.


MLAL 3043 L11 Modern Chinese Literature
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course focuses on the linguistic study of the Chinese language. Students discuss the formal domains of language structure with a focus on Chinese and discuss contemporary research and theory in Chinese linguistics. We will address key topics in Chinese linguistics, like whether Chinese has morphology or a tense/aspect system. The course is taught in Chinese.


MLAL 3080 L11 Tolstoy, Dostoevsky: Life & Death
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

We will read two works – one large book on Russian family life, one short meditation on death – from each of Russia’s two most famous authors: Leo Tolstoy and Fyodor Dostoevsky. We will read Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina (1878) and The Death of Ivan Ilych (1886) and Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov (1880) and The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877). Tolstoy and Dostoevsky are each profound psychologies and religious philosophers. While Tolstoy masters interpersonal and societal relations, Dostoevsky illuminates the extreme ranges of the human psyche. Tolstoy’s Levin in Anna Karenina asks “What is the meaning of life?” and Dostoevsky’s Ivan Karamazov struggles to reconcile God’s creation with the suffering of innocent children. The two novels were written in close proximity of 4each other and bear fruitful comparisons. Tolstoy’s The Death of Ivan Ilych explores the mind of a prestigious court official who is terminally ill. Dostoevsky’s The Dream of a Ridiculous Man reveals the story of a man who dreams his own death. These two great authors are often pitted against each other, but Dostoevsky himself described Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina as “flawless,” and Tolstoy adored Dostoevsky’s religious teachings in The Brother’s Karamazov expressed through the character of Father Zosima. This course shows how the works of the great Russian writers compliment our understanding of life and death.


MLAL 3525 R11 Cultures of Sexual Dissidence in Latin America
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

In this course, we will explore an alternative canon of Latin American literary and cultural production, created by and about subjects whose sexualities have been positioned, from the colonial period on, as divergent from the "norm." Topics to be covered include theoretical approaches to "queer" studies rooted in the region (and tensions with queerness conceived as a North Atlantic epistemological framework), alliances between radical feminism and LGBTQ movements, debates about trans people, the pros and cons of political militancy, and the relationship between sexuality and diaspora.

Mandarin

MAND 1001 L11 Introduction to Mandarin
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWThF, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
5 credits

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of Chinese Linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which, studied interdependently, comprise the Chinese Language.


MAND 1501 L11 Intermediate Mandarin I
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts.


MAND 2001 L21 Mandarin Language and Literature
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

A critical analysis of selected cultural and literary texts: composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.


MLAL 3043 L11 Modern Chinese Literature
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course focuses on the linguistic study of the Chinese language. Students discuss the formal domains of language structure with a focus on Chinese and discuss contemporary research and theory in Chinese linguistics. We will address key topics in Chinese linguistics, like whether Chinese has morphology or a tense/aspect system. The course is taught in Chinese.

Mathematics

MATH 1203 R22 Applied Calculus I
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

This course is designed for students who do not intend to take Calculus 2 or other upper-level math courses. Topics include derivatives of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; curve sketching; and optimization problems.


MATH 1206 R11 Calculus I
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Functions, limits, continuity, Intermediate Value Theorem. The derivative and applications, antiderivatives, Riemann sums, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.


MATH 2005 R21 Multivariable Calculus Ii
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This is a continuation of MATH 2004. Topics include vector fields and their derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, and the theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes. Additional topics, as time permits, may cover one or more of the following: differential forms, functions of a complex variable, equations of fluid mechanics, or mean and Gauss curvature.


MATH 2006 R11 Linear Algebra
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Topics include systems of linear equations, Real and complex vector spaces, linear independence, dimension, linear transformations, matrix representations, kernel and range, determinants and eigenvalues.

Organizational Leadership

ORGL 2210 PW1 Ethical Decision Making for Leadership
Session III: June 1-August 5
Online: Asynchronous
4 credits

Focuses on basic ethical viewpoints as a foundation and examines specific characteristics of business life through cases and examples. The fact that there is not one universal set of behaviors one considers ethical and no guidelines to follow to determine ethical behavior poses unique challenges to contemporary leaders. Yet, leaders are faced with situations where individual values may conflict with those of teams or organizations. Topics include professional responsibility and loyalty, conflict of interest, and employee rights, personal integrity, and critical thinking in decision making.

Philosophy

PHIL 4484 L21 Freedom and Responsibility
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

The course will investigate several problems concerning freedom, responsibility, and the morality of punishment. Is freedom possible in a world completely governed by physical laws? How can I be blamed (or praised) for my actions, given that upbringing, character, and environment are largely matters of luck? Is the practice of punishing criminals morally justifiable? How?

Psychology

PSYC 1100 R21 Biopsychology
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

An introduction to the biological bases of psychology. Research will be presented with an emphasis on how the activity of the nervous system, as shaped by phylogeny and ontogeny, determines behavior. Students replicate classic studies, analyze the results, and prepare lab reports.


PSYC 2000 L21 Statistics
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course covers descriptive statistics and (parametric and nonparametric) inferential statistics. It emphasizes mastery of statistical concepts and utilization of statistical software.


PSYC 2600 L21 Social Psychology
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

An examination of how others shape an individual's behavior. A review of selected topics of interpersonal behavior, including antisocial and prosocial behavior, prejudice, attraction, social influence, attitudes and persuasion, research methods.


PSYC 2800 L11 Personality
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

A critical survey of theories concerned with the origin and development of personality, including psychoanalytic theory, behaviorism, trait theory, field theory, and humanistic psychology. Attention will be given to conceptual problems, controversies, and empirical verification.


PSYC 2900 L21 Abnormal Psychology 
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Analysis of the development and structure of the abnormal personality. Consideration of neuroses and major psychoses as well as the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental disorders is given. 


PSYC 3610 R21 Global Health and Psychology
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

In order to address the needs of diverse populations, culturally-congruent training in health psychology is essential. The goal of this course is to provide a global perspective on understanding and treating significant public health problems and integrating cultural considerations into this framework.


PSYC 3950 R11 Behavior Modification
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

The goals of the course are to teach the principles of behavior and their application to complex human behavior. Students will understand basic principles of behavior, how to analyze complex human behavior in terms of those principles, how to collect data and plot it on graphs, how to conduct research to determine the causes of behavior, and the basics of how to change behavior. This course does not make a student competent to conduct therapy


PSYC 4900 R11 Psychology and Human Values
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This senior values seminar explores pioneering theories and research in the psychology of values. Topics include human motives/goals; the sense of right and wrong; cognitive, social, cultural, spiritual, and gender aspects of ethical decision making; behavior in morally challenging situations; and virtue in relationships, work, and community.

Religious Studies

THEO 3456 R12 Sacred Texts: Bible and Social Justice
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

A study of social justice in the Hebrew and Christian scriptures that involves historical, literary, theological, and ethical interpretations. Students will explore key biblical texts that address themes such as poverty, war, justice, power, and marginalization in historical context, within a history of interpretation, and in light of contemporary practice and theory.


THEO 3711 PW1 Sacred Texts: Middle East
Session III: June 1-August 5
Online: Asynchronous
3 credits

This course introduces students to religious literature from the Middle East, broadly conceived. In the course, students will learn to analyze and contextualize texts from Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia as well as foundational texts of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Zoroastrianism, including the Hebrew Bible and rabbinic writings, the New Testament and early Christian writings, the Qur'an and early Muslim writings. Special attention will be paid to the interactions of these traditions and communities as well as to their enduring legacies.

Sociology

SOCI 1100 L11 Introduction To Sociology
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. 


SOCI 1100 R21 Introduction To Sociology
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. 


SOCI 2925 R21 Media Crime Sex Violence
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Turn on the television set, pick up the local newspaper, go on the Internet or watch a movie. Wherever you turn, you will find the media-saturated with stories about corrupt cops and honest cops, drug dealers and drug users, murderers and victims, organized crime and serial killers, crusading district attorneys and defense attorneys, corrupt lawyers and hanging judges, violent prisoners and convicted innocents. How accurate are these representations? What are the ideological messages and cultural values these stories communicate? In this course, you will learn how to demystify media representations in order to understand how and why they are produced, and who is responsible for their production.


SOCI 3152 R21 Sociology Of Sports
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

In all societies, sports and athletics are socially organized into official events, group rituals, tests of manhood, areas for the expression of political sentiments. In modern societies they have become major industries (and their players, cultural heroes and celebrities); spectator sports and their audiences are important features of post-industrial societies.


SOCI 3406 R11 Race/Social Construct
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course concerns the evolution of racial typologies and classification system in the U.S. We will draw on a variety of texts from natural and social sciences, law, and literature to examine how "scientific" typologies of race are actually more reflective of power dynamics and social hierarchies than biological or genetic differences. Our goal is to understand the continuing significance of race in terms of social and economic power, as well and individual self-conceptualizations and identity politics.


WGSS 4400 L11 Gender, Bodies, Sexuality
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MW, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This course explores how gender and sex shape our lives and the world around us, our experiences of our bodies, and definitions of sexuality. Our focus will be on gender/sexuality as key dimensions of all social structures and institutions, with a particular interest in the intersection between gender and sexuality and the shaping of gendered and sexed bodies. We will examine gender, sex, and sexuality as social constructions, as social relations, as contested sets of cultural meanings, as lived experiences, and as dimensions of social structure. We will discuss challenges to and fissures in the sex/gender/sexuality system. Course materials include theoretical writings, empirical studies, autobiographical reflections, and films. These materials will inspire us to consider the social, economic, cultural, and institutional forces that shape our lives. Students will develop a critical perspective on the sources and consequences of social constructs and inequalities that shape us as individuals, our culture, and the social institutions that we inhabit, such as schools, the workplace, the state, and the family. This includes a critical evaluation of widespread assumptions about gender that we often take for granted, such as the naturalness of categories of “man” and “woman,” “femininity” and “masculinity,” and “heterosexual” and “homosexual.” 

Spanish

SPAN 1501 R11 Intermediate Spanish l
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. The second semester continues and amplifies the work of the first. Conducted in Spanish.


SPAN 1501 R21 Intermediate Spanish l
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. The second semester continues and amplifies the work of the first. Conducted in Spanish.


SPAN 1501 R22 Intermediate Spanish l
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m. (CET)
3 credits

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. The second semester continues and amplifies the work of the first. Conducted in Spanish.


SPAN 2500 PW1 Approaches to Literature
Session III: June 1-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

A basic course in Spanish literature. Close readings in the major forms, prose fiction, poetry and drama, and an introduction to the varieties of critical strategies for reading them. Conducted in Spanish

Theatre

THEA 3066 L11 Musical Theatre Intensive
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 4-6 p.m. and 7-10 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

A five-week summer intensive that offers a varied schedule of four classes: Musical Theatre workshop, Vocal techniques, Dance for Musical Theatre, and Acting, all online for Summer 2021. If you are interested in this course, please email us at summerschool@fordham.edu for special instructions about sending an audition video.

Visual and Media Arts

VART 1128 L21 Digital Photography
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This class is an introduction to the fundamentals of digital photography. Assignments throughout the semester encourage students to explore some of the technical and aesthetic concerns of the medium. Photoshop is used as the primary editing tool. A 3.2 or higher megapixel camera is required.


VART 1128 R11 Digital Photography
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

This class is an introduction to the fundamentals of digital photography. Assignments throughout the semester encourage students to explore some of the technical and aesthetic concerns of the medium. Photoshop is used as the primary editing tool. 


VART 1150 L11 Drawing I
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: MTWTh, 3-6 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

Work in pencil, ink, charcoal, and other graphic media designed to involve students in various approaches and attitudes toward representation and expression in drawing.


VART 1265 L11 Film/Video I
Session II: July 6-August 5
Online: MW, 7-11 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

An introduction to film/video production techniques used to make short projects. Students will study composition, lighting, and editing in creating their own Super 8 mm film and digital video work. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.


VART 2003 L11 Graphic Design and Digital Tools
Session I: June 1-July 1
Online: TWTh, 7-11 p.m. (CET)
4 credits

In this course, the student will learn the basic tools and operations of several different graphics programs. Photoshop, Illustrator, and QuarkXpress will be explained through demonstrations, tutorials, and weekly assignments. The focus will be on a conceptual and analytical approach to design vocabulary and problem-solving.

Apply

To apply please follow the instructions on your university website. When you are ready, please begin by completing the form here. We hope to welcome you to Fordham, online, this summer!