Summer Session UCSC Program

Students on the Rose Hill Campus love being Rams

Fordham is eager to welcome students from the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore.

Session II: July 5-August 4, 2022

Students from UCSC are invited to participate in Session II classes at Fordham's two beautiful New York City campuses, Lincoln Center in Manhattan and Rose Hill in the Bronx or online.

Students live on campus for five weeks and participate in two courses. Please refer to the program description on your university website and feel free to contact your international office at info.outbound@unicatt.it with questions.

Program Benefits

As a Fordham student for the summer, you will have access to all Fordham University facilities (cafeterias, fitness centers, libraries, computing labs) and you will have the benefit of being steps away from everything NYC has to offer.

Make up for lost time by living and learning in the most exciting city in the U.S.

Instructions

You will need to select two courses (at times that do not conflict) to be eligible for the visiting student visa. Please note that the Rose Hill and Lincoln Center campuses are about 30 minutes apart without traffic, so it will not be easy to change campuses between the morning and afternoon classes. Morning and evening or afternoon and evening will be fine! There is a free shuttle to take you between campuses. If you wish to find online options, you can visit the department pages here and look for classes listed as Online in Session 2.

Please note that to receive credit at UCSC, you will need to receive approval from the appropriate faculty at your school.

To apply please follow the instructions on your university website. When you are ready, please begin by completing the form here. We hope to welcome you to Fordham this summer!

  • ACBU 2223 R21 - Principles Of Managerial Accounting
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Rose Hill: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    This course covers how to measure and use cost data for internal decision making under uncertainty. Among the topics covered are job costing, process costing, standard costing, activity-based costing, budgeting, balanced scorecard, direct versus indirect cost measures, cost volume profit analysis, and management control systems.


    Instructor: TBA
    3 credits


    ACBU 3435 R21 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Rose Hill: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    This course is the continuation of ACBU 3434. The course contains rigorous, in-depth coverage of current and noncurrent liabilities, as well as owners' equity. In addition, the course revisits the cash flow statement for additional pertinent topics.


    Instructor: TBA
    3 credits

  • COMC 1101 L21 - Communication and Culture: History, Theory Methods
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Lincoln Center: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    An introduction to the history, theory and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This serves as the required introductory course for the major in Communication and Culture. It provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis.


    Instructor: TBA
    4 credits


    DTEM 2452 L21 - Game Culture: Theory Practice
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MTWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    Games are everywhere and over 155 million Americans play them regularly on tabletops and electronic devices across the county. Their prevalence has prompted the medium as a space for expression, art, and meaning-making. Moving beyond the notion of simple entertainment games are creating provocative experiences to promote change or understanding. This course emphasizes exploration and critical thinking as we discover how games are designed to address issues such as social justice, gender representation, behavioral change, and education. Through analyzing game artifacts and engaging in creative exercises, students will be able to think critically about games and how they are designed. Students will apply this literacy into their own game projects. This course is open to anyone who is interested in games and their possibilities.


    Instructor: Vicari
    4 credits


    DTEM 4480 R21 - Digital Media and Public Responsibility
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Rose Hill: MTWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    An examination of the public cultures, goods, and problems that emerge from the ongoing integration of digital media into everyday life. This course goes beyond a traditional focus on personal problems and responsibilities to explore how publics have and can take collective responsibility to address structural inequities in a digital society.


    Instructor: TBA
    4 credits


    FITV 3571 R21 - Science Fiction In Film and TV
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Rose Hill, Hybrid: T, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    Sociological, cultural, and psychoanalytic analysis and criticism of the science fiction genre in cinema, television, radio, print and other media. Lab fee.


    Instructor: Strate
    4 credits


    FITV 4570 L21 - Films Of Moral Struggle
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.


    Instructor: Foley
    4 credits


    JOUR 2789 R21 - Sports Broadcasting
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    This class will provide a detailed study in all aspects of the sports broadcasting industry. Students will be introduced to a wide array of techniques and philosophies for sports broadcasting, from fundamentals and essentials to advanced learning methods. The course will consist of discussions, critiques, learning exercises, take home assignments and hands-on practice and participation. The course assumes no prior experience in sports broadcasting.


    Instructor: Ciafardini
    4 credits


    NMDD 3880 L21 - Designing Smart Cities For Social Justice
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Lincoln Center, Hybrid: TWTh, 01:00PM - 05:00PM

    This class combines a critical introduction to the promises and perils of the smart city with a community-engaged learning and design project. "Smart Urbanism" represents the rapid integration of networked technologies into all modes of urban living as well as the reorienting of urban economies toward high-tech industries. While much of smart urban rhetoric focuses on designing efficient and globally competitive cities through data-driven platforms, critics argue it has led to stepped-up surveillance, discrimination, segregation, and economic inequality in urban environments. Through class readings, group discussions, and engagement with the Lincoln Square community, students consider how a smart urban design oriented towards social justice could help rework flows of wealth, power, and privilege in New York City.

    CRN:
    Instructor: Donovan
    4 credits

  • ECON 1100 L21 Basic Macroeconomics
    Instructor: Staff, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    Investment, GDP, interest rates, the budget deficit, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, and exchange rates appear frequently in the media, but are often little understood. Macroeconomics studies these aggregates and their interconnections, and looks as well at the influence of the Federal Reserve and the federal government.


    ECON 1200 R21 Basic Microeconomics
    Instructor: Staff, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    Microeconomics studies the decisions and interaction of consumers and businesses, resulting in an understanding of the process by which prices and quantities are determined in a market setting. Forms of industrial organization such as competition, monopoly and oligopoly are explored. Also studied are the markets for labor and other factors of production.


    ECON 2142 R21 Statistical Decision Making
    Instructor: Themeli, Booi, 4 credits
    Rose Hill: MTWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    This computer-assisted course develops the student's ability to collect data, postulate a hypothesis or a model, select the appropriate statistical technique, analyze the data using statistical software, draw correct statistical inference and clearly summarize the findings. Specific topics include chi-square tests, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression and correlation models, time series analysis, and quality control..


    ECON 3453 R21 Law and Economics
    Instructor: Themeli, Booi, 4 credits
    Rose Hill: MW, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school.

  • FNBU 3221 L21 - Financial Management
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Lincoln Center: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    Financial analysis, planning and control in the business firm. Optimum capital structure and leverage. Working capital management and sources of suitable short-term funds. Long-term investment decisions and capital budgeting. Valuation problems in financing and acquisitions.


    Instructor: Gu
    3 credits


    FNBU 3440 L21 - Corporate Financial Policy
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Lincoln Center: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    From the standpoint of finance theory, the value created by a corporation depends on the profitability of investments and the mode of financing these investments. This course enables students to analyze and understand the interaction between the investment and financing decisions. Corporate finance topics such as capital budgeting, cost of capital, raising capital, dividend policy, hedging, mergers and acquisitions, and international corporate finance may be covered.


    Instructor: Bode
    3 credits

  • HIST 1100 R21 UHC: American Slavery and Jacksonian Democracy 18012-1850
    Instructor: Alcenat, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.


    HIST 3362 L21 Crime & Punishment
    Instructor: Myers, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: MW, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    The history of defining, prosecuting, and punishing transgressions, both religious and secular, in Europe, especially from 1500-1800. The course will focus on the development of so-called modern beliefs about crime and law.


    MLAL 2000 L21 Texts and Contexts
    Instructor: Lapenta, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    This course examines the way in which the literary and artistic forms of modern Italy represent political and social movements such as revolution, unification, modernization, and migration. We will focus on texts from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries that utilize differing modes -- such as fiction, nonfiction, film, poetry, and music -- and we will analyze how these texts draw upon, reflect and refashion the meaning of historical events. In juxtaposing texts of different types, we will explore the mechanisms by which symbols and ideas are inherited through and adapted to differing contexts. Taught in English.


    MVST 3838 L21 Exploring Medieval NY
    Instructor: Maria Christina Bruno, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    All five boroughs of New York City bear traces of the medieval, despite having been built, as we see them, long after the period that corresponds with the European Middle Ages (c. 500 to c.1500 CE) ended. This course aims to explore the medieval, broadly understood, in New York City, keeping in mind several categories: Medieval objects and artifacts in New York City.  Students will participate in the Medieval New York project sponsored by Fordham’s Center for Medieval Studies. This project aims to investigate these issues and to craft walking itineraries around the city, showcasing these sites and ideas through the use of audio guides and multimedia materials for a broad public audience. By the end of this project, in addition to talking through these issues, student groups will have crafted itineraries of their own that will be featured on the project’s site at medievalny.ace.fordham.edu.


    PHIL 1000 L21 Philosophy of Human Nature
    Instructor: Ciaran Coyle, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    This course is a philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith, and reason); free will and determinism; self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity, and tradition); and the elements of identity (such as race, gender, sexuality, ability, and socioeconomic status). At least 60% of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure and one figure coming from a group traditionally underrepresented in philosophy.


    PHIL 1000 R21 Philosophy of Human Nature
    Instructor: Guin, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    This course is a philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith, and reason); free will and determinism; self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity, and tradition); and the elements of identity (such as race, gender, sexuality, ability, and socioeconomic status). At least 60% of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure and one figure coming from a group traditionally underrepresented in philosophy.


    PHIL 3000 L21 Philosophical Ethics
    Instructor: Marcus Schweiger, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision-making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences among these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half of the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure and one figure coming from a group traditionally underrepresented in philosophy.


    PHIL 3000 R21 Philosophical Ethics
    Instructor: Matthew Glaser, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision-making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences among these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half of the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure and one figure coming from a group traditionally underrepresented in philosophy.


    SPAN 1001 L21 Introduction to Spanish I
    Instructor: Mihailovic, Jelena, 5 credits
    Lincoln Center: MTWR, 02:00PM - 06:00PM

    An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of Spanish linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which studied interdependently, comprise the Spanish Language.


    SPAN 1501 R21 Intermediate Spanish I
    Instructor: Urízar, Blanca, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    Intermediate Spanish I will continue introducing students to the fundamentals of the Spanish language, emphasizing the five main components of language acquisition (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and cultural competence) using a task- and content-based Spanish learning program. Conducted in Spanish.


    SPAN 1502 L21 Intermediate Spanish II
    Instructor: Domenech-Romero, María Cristina, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    Intermediate Spanish II will continue introducing students to the fundamentals of the Spanish language, emphasizing the five main components of language acquisition (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and cultural competence) using a task- and content-based Spanish learning program. Conducted in Spanish.


    SPAN 2001 L21 Spanish Lang & Literature
    Instructor: Severiche, Guillermo, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    Study of selected literary texts and review of pertinent grammatical structures, textual analysis, composition, and conversation. Conducted in Spanish.


    SPAN 2001 R21 Spanish Lang & Literature
    Instructor: Bustos, María Natalia, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    Study of selected literary texts and review of pertinent grammatical structures, textual analysis, composition, and conversation. Conducted in Spanish.


    THEA 2015 L21 Acting for Non-majors
    Instructor: Kimmel, Michael, 4 credits
    Lincoln Center: MTWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    Introductory acting technique for non-theatre performance majors. Emphasis on developing and freeing the voice, body, imagination, and emotions. Activities of the course include vocal and body warm-ups, theatre games and exercises, improvisation, and scene work.


    THEA 3067 L21 Solo Vocal Performance
    Instructor: Sabella, David, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 10:00AM - 01:00PM

    In this course, students will develop the unique skills for solo vocal performance, from identifying your authentic voice to honing your vocal technique to connecting with your audience and promoting yourself. Grounded in the history and business of cabaret, the course will give students a chance to work one-on-one with a master teacher in vocal technique and with an accompanist to craft their own multi-song performance.


    THEO 1000 R21 Faith and Critical Reason
    Instructor: Van Dyne, Benjamin, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    An introductory theology course designed to acquaint students with the analytical study of religion and religious experience, and to give them some critical categories of evaluating the history of theological discourse. The academic study of some of the forms, concepts, experience, and theological formulations found in Christianity and various other traditions will be introduced.


    THEO 3390 L21 Church & Controversy
    Instructor: Barnes, John, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    This course traces the Catholic Church’s negotiations with the revolutionary challenges inaugurated by modernity. Topics will vary according to the instructor, but may include the colonial missions, the Enlightenment, the Holocaust, the Second Vatican Council, the rise of feminism, changing notions of normative sexuality, and more recent developments, such as the unprecedented numbers of religiously “unaffiliated” or “nones,” the majority of which have come from the Catholic Church. How did the Catholic Church—its theologians, the millions of everyday faithful, and the Vatican—respond to, sometimes deepening, sometimes informing, and oftentimes critiquing these challenges? Controversies forced the Church not only to make pronouncements on the crises of the moment, but to refine and sometimes revise some of its basic foundational beliefs about human nature, revelation, reason, truth, and God.


    THEO 3620 R21 Great Christian Hymns
    Instructor: Holsberg, Lisa, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    This course will examine the poetry of Christian hymnody, beginning with the New Testament to the present, in order to unpack the rich and divergent theology expressed through its language and symbol, metaphor and doxology.


    VART 1124 L21 Photography I
    Instructor: Lawton, Joseph, 4 credits
    Lincoln Center: MTWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    Instruction is offered in basic camera and darkroom techniques of black-and-white photography. Class will also include critiques of students' work and discussions of aesthetic questions pertaining to photography. Students should have adjustable cameras. Additional darkroom hours required.


    VART 1150 R21 Drawing I
    Instructor: Wamsley, Lesley, 4 credits
    Rose Hill: MTWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    Work in pencil, ink, charcoal, and other graphic media designed to involve students in various approaches and attitudes toward representation and expression in drawing.

  • BLBU 3443 L21 - Ethics In Business
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Lincoln Center: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    This course aims to help students recognize the moral dimension of business decision-making and to provide these students with tools to navigate the potential ethical issues that they are likely to face in the business world.


    Instructor: TBA
    3 credits


    ORGL 2200 L21 - Transforming Managers
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MW on campus; TTh online, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    This course will take an integrative view of the organization’s transformation, detailing which capabilities are most critical to success while providing key references to what defines the roles of leaders and how managers can acquire and develop leadership skills. There will be a focus on how managers are able to creatively innovate, inspire, and engage people to adapt to fast-paced transformation and minimize the risk of failure.

    CRN:
    Instructor: Politzer
    4 credits

  • MKBU 3435 R21 - Consumer Behavior
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Rose Hill: TWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    An interdisciplinary approach to the study of consumer behavior and motivation. Topics include behavioral science findings and their implications in the marketing mix; socioeconomics, demographic and cultural influences; theories of promotion and communication; consumer behavior models; attitude measurement; perception and consumerism.


    Instructor: Bohn
    3 credits


    MKBU 3440 R21 - Global Marketing
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Rose Hill: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    This course addresses the need for global approaches to today's business by focusing on product design, promotion, distribution channels and pricing strategies that are tailored to diverse international cultural, political, competitive and economic environments. Specific attention is place on the feasibility of import/export, and national or global policies regarding marketing issues.


    Instructor: DeFrancesco
    3 credits


    MKBU 4454 R21 - Special Topic: Sports Marketing
    Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
    Rose Hill: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    The entertainment sector is a major industry. Within that sector, sports activities are targeting a number of demographic and other segments of the population. While some sports (collegiate and professional) are quite successful in their marketing strategies, others struggle to gain or to hold their audience within a competitive market place. This course evaluates the marketing mix of those sports teams and institutions that are successful and assesses the marketing ingredients of those sports activities that are struggling to gain a larger or profitable share of the audience.

    CRN:
    Instructor: Petit
    3 credits

  • BISC 1010 R21 Foundations in Biology
    Instructor: Pool, Justin, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    In this introductory course for non-science majors, a general survey of the characteristics of life is presented, including such topics as cellular biology, metabolism, organ systems, genetics, development, evolution, behavior, and ecology. All forms of life will be studied, with emphasis on the human body and human evolutionary history.


    BISC 3221 R21 Human Anatomy
    Instructor: Frank, Craig, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    A lecture course which examines cell, tissue, and gross anatomy of the major organ systems of the human body as they relate to life processes in health and disease.


    BISC 3231 R21 Human Anatomy Lab
    Instructor: Frank, Craig, 2 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    A laboratory course employing slides, models and gross dissection to study the structure of the major organ systems of the human body.


    BISC 3643 R21 Microbiology
    Instructor: Santos, Victor, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    Detailed study of microbial metabolism and physiology; microbial roles in maintaining earth's ecosystems and human health; global environmental change and effects on emerging infectious diseases, epidemiology, and public health.


    BISC 3653 R21 Microbiology Lab
    Instructor: Santos, Victor, 2 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    Laboratory exercises are designed to develop skills in: sterile culture techniques for isolating bacteria and fungi from natural substrates; microscopy and staining techniques for visualization, identification and quantification of microbes.


    CHEM 1110 R21 Forensic Science
    Instructor: Beer, Robert, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: R, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    An introductory lecture and laboratory course designed for non-science majors who have not taken chemistry. A study of the methods and techniques in forensic science. Topics include fires, explosions, drugs, forensic toxicology, glass and soil, paints, fibers, hair, blood, body fluids, fingerprints, toolmarks, and firearms. Several short lab experiments will be required.


    CISC 4750 L21 Scientific Computation Matlab
    Instructor: Tad Strzemecki, 4 credits
    Lincoln Center: MTWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    An introduction to computer science concepts, programming skills, and algorithmic problem-solving in MATLAB. Assumes basic programming background. Design and analysis of numerical algorithms including numerical integration, numerical differentiation, curve fitting and differential equations. Introduction to Monte Carlo methods. Application of MATLAB in computational science and computational engineering. Solution of linear systems and eigenvalue problems. Complex numbers algebra. .


    MATH 1100 L21 Finite Mathematics
    Instructor: Staff, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    Solutions to systems of linear equations, counting techniques including Venn diagrams, permutations, combinations, probability, Bayes theorem, Markov chains. This course is designed to introduce general liberal arts students to the use of mathematics as a tool in the solution of problems that arise in the "real world". Applications will be chosen from areas such as business, economics, and other social and natural sciences. These applications will be based upon mathematical topics chosen from a field called Finite Mathematics. Specific topics to be covered may include Linear Programming, Probability, Statistics, and Finance. The only prior knowledge expected is arithmetic, elementary algebra, and graphing, which students should already be familiar with from previous high school or college courses and/or the Mathematics Workshop. It will be presumed that students possess basic skills in these areas.


    MATH 1109 L21 Math for Business: Calculus
    Instructor: Staff, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    Calculus for business majors. Topics include derivatives of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithm functions. Curve sketching and optimization problems. The definite integral. Applications are drawn from business and economics.


    MATH 1206 L21 Calculus I
    Instructor: Staff, 4 credits
    Lincoln Center: MTWR, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    Calculus for science and math majors. Functions, limits, continuity, Intermediate Value Theorem. The derivative and applications, antiderivatives, Riemann sums, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.


    NSCI 1020 L21 Physical Sciences: Today's World
    Instructor: Staff, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    This course will introduce the non-science major to the applications of physics and chemistry to medical, industrial, and environmental issues. Laboratory sessions will complement the lecture topics.


    NSCI 1030 L21 Human Function and Dysfunction
    Instructor: Staff, 3 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    Introduces the non-science major to intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting the human body. Topics include genetic engineering, neuroscience, behavior, and disease. Laboratory sessions will complement the lecture topics.

  • ANTH 1500 L21 Intro to Fashion & Culture
    Instructor: Gloria Garcia, 4 credits
    Lincoln Center: MTWR, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    In this class, students will be introduced to cultural and media studies concepts that will equip them with the theoretical and methodological tools necessary to explore fashion as a historically situated and context-dependent form of communication and meaning making. The course considers the implications of fashion within systems of power, every day acts of self-presentation, and larger politics of representation.


    IDIS 1250 R21 Foundations of Public Health
    Instructor: Sankar, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    This course will introduce students to community and public health. We will study the foundations of community and public health using readings and class discussions, and will examine prevailing community and health problems and new developments. There will be an emphasis on developing the knowledge base and skills necessary for a career in health education and health promotion. Topics will include definitions of health, community health, public health, and mental health, epidemiology, communicable and noncommunicable diseases, environmental health, health disparities in various population demographics, and racial and ethnic populations. Practitioners and experts in the field will be invited to give presentations to the class. Students will get opportunities to explore the various health issues and discuss prevalence of various diseases, with a focus on COVID-19, diabetes, asthma, and other diseases, as well as opportunities to participate in a volunteer experience in a clinical/hospital setting.


    POSC 3915 L11 - International Political Economics
    Instructor: Aleman, Jose, 4 credits
    Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    This course introduces various theoretical frameworks explaining the international political economy and examine topics including trade, monetary policy, exchange rates, finance, multinational corporations, international institutions, and economic development. There is a particular focus on the distribution of benefits within an increasingly globalized world, and the ways in which interest groups work to advance their favored economic policies within this system.


    SOCI 1100 R21 Introduction to Sociology
    Instructor: Daniel Durkin, 3 credits
    Rose Hill: TWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course is required prior to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.


    SOCI 3102 R21 Contemporary Social Issues and Policies
    Instructor: Daniel Durkin, 4 credits
    Rose Hill: MTWR, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

    Global issues such as world hunger, human rights, and nuclear war, as well as American issues concerning inequalities of wealth, civil rights, crime, family, and the role of government, are examined in this course. In addition to gaining an understanding of the social, political, and economic dimensions of these issues, students will carefully consider underlying value principles and religious ethics.


    SOCI 3249 L21 Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Death and Dying
    Instructor: Katia Yurguis, 4 credits
    Lincoln Center: MTWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    The primary goal of this course is to explore the social and cultural implications of the biological experience of human death and dying. Examples of topics that will be covered include: mortuary rituals and funerary behavior, the cultural construction of death, the effects of death on the social fabric, morning and bereavement, end-of-life issues, as well as ethical and moral Issues relating to death. Throughout the course, we will examine the fascinating variety of social and cultural responses to the biological fact of death. In doing so, we will explore Anthropological and Sociological literature that seeks to explain or interpret that tremendous variety. The course will be cross-cultural in its outlook and will require students to make conceptual connections between theoretical literature and empirical observations.

  • PSYC 2900 R21 Psychopathology
    Instructor: Staff, 4 credits
    Rose Hill: MTWR, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

    Analysis of the development and structure of the abnormal personality. Consideration of neuroses and major psychoses as well as the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental disorders is given.


    PSYC 3340 L21 Urban Psychology
    Instructor: Takooshian, 4 credits
    Lincoln Center: TWR, 01:00PM - 05:00PM

    How living in a large city can affect an individual's behavior and personality. Investigations into the "urban personality," stress, family, friends and strangers, crowding, the built environment, adaptation. Includes field research.


    PSYC 3600 L21 Multicultural Psychology
    Instructor: Staff, 4 credits
    Lincoln Center: MTWR, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

    The focus of this course is the multicultural applicability of scientific and professional psychology. Traditional psychological theories, scientific psychology, psychological tests, and the practice of psychology will be examined and critiqued from cultural and socio-historical perspectives. Contemporary psychological theories and research specific to men, women, gay men, lesbians, and race/ethnicity will be reviewed.