Skip to main content

English Graduate Current Courses

2021 - 2022 Graduate Courses

For English Website

All English graduate courses are held on the Rose Hill campus unless otherwise specified.

Undergraduate English Majors in their senior year are welcome to request admission to the 5000-level graduate courses listed below. If you’d like to take one of these courses, write to gradenglish@Fordham.edu. Please include in your email the specific course(s) in which you are interested.

Fall 2021

ENGL 5001: RESEARCH METHODS (Fridays, 2:00-4:30 at Lincoln Center)
Stuart Sherman
An introduction to English studies at the graduate level, emphasizing bibliography, scholarly writing, and critical intervention. Although the emphasis of the course will vary according to the aims of the instructor, areas covered may also include book history, textual editing, historical research, and other issues of professional concern to graduate students.
CRN 13250
~
Required for all incoming PhD students.

ENGL 5118 – WRITING THAT HEALS: STORYTELLING LAB (Thursdays, 10:30-1:00)
Julie Kim/Sarah Gambito
How do we heal and recover from illnesses and other bodily and mental challenges? We usually think that this question needs to be answered by science, but this course will consider the interdisciplinary field of narrative medicine and the connections it draws between scientific and humanistic practices of treatment. Narrative medicine holds that stories and storytelling are foundational to healing. Together, we will explore this premise by doing two things. First, we’ll read works about the methods of narrative medicine, as well as relevant stories of illness and healing from the eighteenth century to the present. Second, we’ll write our own stories to experiment with the connections between narration and healing. Additional activities will include workshopping the stories of our peers and working together as a “lab” or collaborative group of researchers on a collective storytelling project. The goal of this course is both to learn about new approaches to humanistic inquiry and to experience how writing can be a creative process of play that feeds into all areas of life, academic and otherwise. Texts may include Rita Charon’s Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness, Hans Sloane’s Voyage to Jamaica, Mary Prince’s History of Mary Prince, Saidiya Hartman’s Lose Your Mother, Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies, Kimiko Hahn’s Unbearable Heart, and Danez Smith’s Homie.
CRN 45456
~
Fulfills H2, H3, DI

ENGL 5194: MASTER CLASS: FICTION AND OTHER ART FORMS (Wednesdays, 12:00-2:00 at Lincoln Center)
Stacey D'Erasmo
Neither the writing nor the reading of fiction happens in an aesthetic vacuum. We read, watch, listen, feel, and even taste all manner of other art forms, and these experiences inspire us, move us, and often find their way into what we write and how we write. In this course, we will explore the influence of music, the visual arts, theater, film, and even cooking on the fiction we read and write, and vice versa. Bring your curiosity and your willingness to be changed as a writer by other ways of making art. 
CRN 45543
~

ENGL 5203: THE POSTCOLONIAL MIDDLE AGES (Tuesdays, 11:00-1:30)
Suzanne Yeager
The course addresses the multiplicity of ways in which postcolonial theory can be used to illuminate pre-modern texts. Texts to be read in Middle English include the Croxton Play of the Sacrament, Geoffrey Chaucer’s Man of Law’s Tale and Prioress’s Tale, among others, along with medieval texts in translation, such as The Letter of Prester John, and the Beauvais Play of Daniel. These works offer complex views of alterity, conquest, place, space, and performance which are foundational in discussing how the Middle Ages can be viewed as postcolonial.
CRN 45457
~
Fulfills H1, DI

ENGL 5301: ROMANTICISM AND ECOCRITICISM (Fridays, 10:30-12:50 at Lincoln Center)
Sarah Zimmerman
In the work of Raymond Williams, Jonathan Bate, and others, the field of British Romanticism made important contributions to an early ecocriticism. We will consider how this work participated in the growth of an interdisciplinary body of environmentalist studies that includes Lawrence Buell, Cheryll Glotfelty, Timothy Morton, and Monique Allewaert, and Anne-Lise Francois. Our historical questions will focus on how the period’s writers developed an acute attention to their natural environments in the midst of a “second scientific revolution,” the enclosure acts, urbanization and industrialization, the rise of a global tourism industry, and imperial expansion. Authors, artists, and tourists alike employed the popular aesthetic traditions of the sublime, the beautiful, and picturesque in viewing their surroundings. We will concentrate on authors such as Edmund Burke, Olaudah Equiano, William Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley, and John Clare. We will also spend some time on visual media, including book illustrations, and the experiments of Constable and Turner on (respectively) clouds and sunsets in the light of new scientific understandings of the atmosphere.
CRN 45544
~
Fulfills H2

ENGL 5717: TRANSATLANTIC WOMEN MODERNISTS (Thursdays, 2:30-5:00) 
Anne Fernald
This class looks at gender and modernism on both sides of the Atlantic. We will read a generous selection of women modernists, canonical and noncanonical, representing high modernism and “bad modernism” (to use Mao and Walkowitz’s term), fiction, film, and poetry from the first half of the 20th century. Our transatlantic focus offers a special opportunity to examine multicultural and cosmopolitan modernisms: many women writers in this period were travelers and immigrants. We will also analyze the complex and often fraught relationships among feminist criticism, feminist theory, and theories of modernism, both in the early 20th century and today. Authors include: Gertrude Stein, Zora Neale Hurston, Elizabeth Bishop, Una Marson, Jean Rhys, Bessie Smith, and Virginia Woolf.
CRN 45458
~
Fulfills H3, DI

ENGL 5749 - Twentieth-Century Studies: Decolonization and World Literature (Mondays, 5:30 PM - 8:00)
Christopher GoGwilt
Introductory graduate course in the study of selected twentieth-century figures from comparative cultural, literary, and theoretical perspectives. The course will examine the changing contours of literary theory, literary studies, and the status of literature itself in the twentieth century, in light of the contending imperatives of decolonization and globalization. The course will focus on three pairings of writers: Joseph Conrad and W. E. B. Du Bois; Jean Rhys and C. L. R. James; Pramoedya Ananta Toer and Amitav Ghosh. Select works from these writers will be studied in conjunction with critical selections from Fanon, Glissant, Pheng Cheah, and others.
CRN 46560
~

Fulfills H3, DI

ENGL 5998: MA CAPSTONE (Mondays, 2:30-5:30) 
Leonard Cassuto
Seminar for MA students who wish to fulfill the Capstone requirement (note: the Capstone requirement may also be fulfilled, as an independent study, during the spring or summer semesters. Please contact the DGS if you are unsure about which semester would be best for your Capstone completion.
CRN 45455
~
Fulfills: MA Capstone

ENGL 6105 Post-1945 US Literature and Culture (Tuesdays, 2:30-5:00)
Maria Farland
This course considers US authors from the post war period--John Hershey, Lorraine Hansberry, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsburg, Sylvia Plath, Toni Morrison, Audre Lorde, and others--in terms of contemporary cultural trends (suburbanization, the Cold War, censorship, McCarthyism) and countercultural movements (beatniks, hippies, feminists, free speech, antipsychiatry). We examine changing definitions of America’s “mainstream” and “margins” amidst social movements from the 1960s through the 1980s, and analyze the trajectory of new forms of dissent and protest. Topics include the Cold War, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of trauma and memory.
CRN 46215
~
Fulfills H3, DI


ENGL 5115: INTERNSHIP SEMINAR (Tutorial)
Maria Farland
Open to graduate students who have secured an internship in publishing or other degree-related fields for the fall 2021 semester. Before enrolling in this Tutorial, you must contact the Director of Graduate Studies to make sure that your internship qualifies for course credit.
CRN 33500
~

ENGL 6004 – COLLOQUIUM: PEDAGOGY THEORY PRACTICUM (Tuesdays, 2:30-5:00)
Crystal Colombini
Required 10th course for PhD Students. To register, contact the graduate administrator after receiving a passing grade in the first part of the Practicum, ENGL 5999.
CRN 13269
~

ENGL 8935: DISSERTATION SEMINAR (Tuesdays, 5:30-8:00)
Maria Farland
This 0-credit seminar is designed as a resource for all doctoral students. Students working on the dissertation proposal are encouraged to take this class. During each meeting students will present and respond to work in progress. Across the semester, the seminar will treat challenges of research and strategies of effective writing specific to large projects.
CRN 40212
~

ENGL 8936: ACADEMIC ISSUES: PUBLICATION, FELLOWSHIPS, & THE JOB MARKET(S) (Wednesdays, 5:30-8:00) 
Andrew Albin

This 0-credit seminar, open to all graduate students. For Fall 2020 students who would like help with three kinds of professional documents are especially encouraged to sign up: articles for publication, fellowship applications (internal and external), and materials for the job market. 
CRN 14025
~

 

Spring 2022

ENGL 5023: The Phenomenon of Oprah's Book Club (Fridays, 2:30 – 5:00; Lincoln Center Campus)
Dennis Tyler
Since its inception in September 1996, Oprah’s Book Club (OBC) has transformed the literary landscape—from ushering in a new wave of enthusiastic readers and spiking the sale of books around the globe to reshaping the advertising and marketing of literature and offering readers strategies for engaging it. This course will explore the phenomenon of OBC, thinking through its formation and rise as well as its strategies and approaches to literature. We will tackle these matters as we examine closely themes of racial beauty, sexual assault, racism, imprisonment, disability, and politics in OBC-selected texts, such as Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, Ernest Gaines’s A Lesson before Dying, and Michelle Obama’s Becoming.
CRN TBA
~

Fulfills H3, DI

ENGL 5024: Cultural Studies and Literary Studies: Keywords (Tuesdays, 11:00AM-1:30PM)
Glenn Hendler
This course is designed to encourage critical analysis of the language we use in the study of literature and culture. Our primary texts will be short essays drawn from Keywords for American Cultural Studies and the other books listed at http://keywords.nyupress.org/; Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society; Keywords: The New Language of Capitalism; and Keywords for Radicals. These essays will draw us to longer works of theory and scholarship; for instance, reading keyword essays on “race” and “racialization” will be linked to major works of Critical Race Theory that they cite. Students in the class can expect to try out forms of research and writing other than the standard critical essay, including but not limited to writing both individual and collaborative keyword essays of their own. 
CRN TBA
~

Fulfills H3, DI

ENGL 5193 – Master Class: Stuff of Fiction (Wednesdays, 12:00-2:00; Lincoln Center Campus)
Stacey D'Erasmo
“’The proper stuff of fiction’ does not exist,” Virginia Woolf declared in an essay called “Modern Fiction”: “everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss.” In this workshop we will explore the process of transforming imaginative musings and life experience into fiction, looking particularly at how memory and place can serve as points of departure. We'll examine how the details of everyday life can be transformed imaginatively into fiction through the use of character, setting, and dialogue. Along the way, we will stop to examine various aspects of craft such as theme, style, plot, and pacing in students' own writings as well as in selected readings.
CRN 38974
~

ENGL 5201 -- Autobiography and Politics (Mondays, 2:30-5:00)
Larry Kramer
When did writing one's life story become political?  Following St. Augustine's Confessions, most autobiographies until the eighteenth century (despite some notable exceptions) were narratives of religious conversion, and some element of redemption has remained a typical feature.  But by the end of the eighteenth century, autobiography in English had begun to replace redemption with personal development and religion with politics. These two trends were closely intertwined, as we will see in a series of readings that begins with Olaudah Esquiano and William Wordsworth, whose accounts engage respectively with slavery and the French Revolution.  Subsequent readings will investigate the mutuality of public and private life in works by John Stuart Mill, Henry James, Jane Addams, Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Richard Wright, and James Baldwin.
CRN TBA
~

Fulfills H2, H3, DI


ENGL 5115: INTERNSHIP SEMINAR (Tutorial)
Maria Farland
This seminar is open to graduate students pursuing internships in publishing, museum management, or arts administration during the spring 2020 semester. Please contact the Director of Graduate Studies to make sure that your internship qualifies for course credit.
CRN 33500
~

ENGL 5998: MA CAPSTONE (Mondays, 2:30-5:00) 
Maria Farland
Required course for MA students who wish to fulfill the Capstone assignment. Please contact the DGS if you are unsure about which semester would be best for your Capstone completion.
CRN 45455
~

ENGL 5999 – COLLOQUIUM: PEDAGOGY THEORY PRACTICUM (Tuesdays, 2:30-5:00)
Crystal Colombini
Required 10th course for PhD Students. To register, contact the graduate administrator after receiving a passing grade in the first part of the Practicum, ENGL 5999. 
CRN 44282
~

ENGL 8935: DISSERTATION SEMINAR (Thursdays, 5:30-8:00)
Andrew Albin
This 0-credit seminar is designed as a resource for all doctoral students who have passed the comprehensive exam. Students working on the dissertation proposal are encouraged to take this class. During each meeting students will present and respond to work in progress. Across the semester, the seminar will treat challenges of bibliographic research and strategies of effective writing specific to large projects.
CRN 40212
~