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Communication and Media Studies Summer Courses

COMC 2117 PW1 - Language and Strategic Communication
Session III, May 26 - August 4, 2020

Online

An examination of how we use words and symbols as tools for thought and guides for action, how the structures of language and symbolic communication can relate to the structures of consciousness and culture. Analysis of the role of language in understanding our world, constructing reality, and evaluating messages and information. Pragmatic strategies for avoiding misevaluation and misunderstanding, resolving conflict, and improving clarity of communication through awareness of language habits in interpersonal, organizational, and mediated contexts are emphasized.

CRN: 11409
Instructor: Strate
4 credits


COMC 2277 L11 - Media and Sexuality
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1 - 5 p.m.

By all accounts, we have witnessed an explosion of LGBTQ representation in the media over the last decade. This course critically examines the terms of this new visibility, and inquires into the exclusions that accompany the recognition of certain queer and trans subjects. Through the study of media, film, and popular culture, we will explore how representations of sex and sexuality are also central to the construction of ideas about race, class, gender, and nation

CRN: 11250
Instructor: Moorman
4 credits


COMC 3114 L21 - Effective Speaking
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Lincoln Center: W (hybrid), 6 - 9 p.m.

A study of principles of effective communication with emphasis on the role of public speaking skills in professional life, the importance of critical thinking to communication and its significance in a democratic political system.

CRN: 11241
Instructor: Terrigno
4 credits


COMC 3247 L21 - Race, Class, and Gender in Media
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Lincoln Center: TTh (hybrid), 9:30 - 12:30 p.m.

This class analyzes representations of social class, racial and ethnic identity, and gender and sexuality in media. We begin our work with two assumptions. First, that media both shape and are shaped by social conceptions. Second, that these categories - race, class, and gender - are embodied, that is, they describe different physical bodies that inhabit real, lived environments. From there, students learn to identify central themes and problems in representing differences of race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality in fiction and nonfiction media. The class will use a mixture of hands-on activities with contemporary media (such as blogging, journaling, and online discussions) plus more traditional readings about theories of representation and embodiment. The course is intended as a learning environment where students are able to do more than simply identify stereotypes. Rather, they intervene in these representations, actively critiquing stereotypes and moving past them towards a reflective attitude about the relationship between society as it is lived for people of different racial, sexual, and class groups - and the image of those groups as depicted in the media.

CRN: 11243
Instructor: Schwartz
4 credits


COMC 3375 L11 - Children and Media
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This course explores the controversy surrounding children's media. Topics such as the role of media in socialization and learning, the effects of media content and communication technologies on children's behavior, thought and emotions are examined. The functions that media perform for children, and the efforts to design media specifically for children are considered. Various forms such as television, popular music, film, video games, fairy tales, and children's literature are explored. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

CRN: 11252
Instructor: Freeman
4 credits


COMC 4348 R11 - Religion, Theology, and New Media
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 9 a.m. - Noon

An interdisciplinary capstone course, this course examines the historical and theoretical significance of the intersection between communication, technologies, and religious communities. Drawing on the disciplinary methods and assumptions of both communication and media studies and theology, the course will ask students to critically and theoretically explore the significance of religion as a cultural phenomenon as well as to take seriously the theological significance of media practices as articulated by religious subjects.

CRN: 11254
Instructor: Casteline
4 credits


DTEM 2443 L11 - Fashion and Digital Media
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1 - 5 p.m.

This course examines what happens when one of the oldest forms of communication, fashion, meets up with the newest, digital media. Digital media has reconfigured the fashion industry: bloggers sit alongside famous magazine editors at Fashion shows, the retail industry collapses as online shopping takes off, platforms such as Instagram reconfigure social status and power. While digital media creates new jobs, communities celebrities, status, and power in the fashion world, it also maintains and creates new social inequalities. We will examine the relationship between fashion and digital media from three vantage points: globally, locally, and personally. Our global focus considers the ways digital media creates new networks of production/labor people; the local unit considers new jobs and identities (such as "influencers") in the fashion industry, with special focus on New York City; and our focus on the personal.

CRN: 11256
Instructor: Van Cleaf
4 credits


DTEM 4440 R11 - Privacy and Surveillance
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Rose Hill: TTh (hybrid), 1 - 5 p.m.

New technologies, from closed-circuit television cameras to large databases, have shifted the information landscape in ways that call into question cultural assumptions and social norms about sharing, visibility, and the very essence of privacy. Can we have privacy in the digital age? Is mass surveillance justified? Whose interests are being served, and who is at risk? This course is designed to promote student awareness of and sensitivity to the ethics, values, and latest developments in global privacy and surveillance.

CRN: 11258
Instructor: Klang
4 credits


DTEM 4480 L21 - Digital Media and Public Responsibility
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1 - 5 p.m.

An examination of the choices and responsibilities which shape personal identity and common humanity for those who regularly employ the tools of digital media and computer technology. Regular use of digital media enables individuals to separate from their physical selves and from the community spaces in which they have traditionally lived. This course focuses on the resulting ethical tensions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

CRN: 11245
Instructor: Donovan
4 credits


FITV 1601 L21 - Understanding Television
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Critical analysis of television as a storytelling medium. Study of current approaches to television narrative and style. Screenings and discussion of television series and news programming.

CRN: 11276
Instructor: Monk-Payton
4 credits


FITV 2425 L11 - Digital Video Production I
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

This introductory workshop class will teach the fundamentals of digital video production and cinematic storytelling. Students will learn concepts, techniques, and technologies pertaining to digital video and sound through hands-on production and post-production assignments. We will explore the aesthetics and the communicative potential of the medium through screenings, critiques, and exercises.

CRN: 11260
Instructor: Bordogna
4 credits


FITV 3571 R21 - Science Fiction in Film and Television
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Rose Hill: T (hybrid), 6 - 9 p.m.

Sociological, cultural, and psychoanalytic analysis and criticism of the science fiction genre in cinema, television, radio, print, and other media. Course fee.

CRN: 11278
Instructor: Strate
4 credits


FITV 3579 R21 - Movies and the American Experience
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 9 a.m. - Noon

A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature film from the early 20th century to the present. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Course fee.

CRN: 11279
Instructor: Hayes
4 credits


FITV 4570 R11 - Films of Moral Struggle
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

This course will survey both American and world cinema for their approaches to moral and ethical issues. We will unpack some of the complex philosophical underpinnings of morality while becoming better readers of film and develop a more acute awareness of the relationship between form and content, medium and message. Fulfills the Senior values/EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Course fee.

CRN: 11262
Instructor: Reich
4 credits


JOUR 2789 R21 - Sports Broadcasting
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Rose Hill: TWTh (hybrid), 6 - 9 p.m.

This class will provide a detailed study in all aspects of the sports broadcasting industry. Students will be introduced to a wide array of techniques and philosophies for sports broadcasting, from fundamentals and essentials to advanced learning methods. The course will consist of discussions, critiques, learning exercises, take-home assignments and hands-on practice and participation. The course assumes no prior experience in sports broadcasting.

CRN: 11295
Instructor: Ciafardini
4 credits


NMDD 3450 L11 - UX Design: Design for Empowerment
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Lincoln Center: MTTh (hybrid) 3 week intensive, 1 - 5 p.m.

This course focuses on how human-centered design and participatory design methods can be used as approaches to empowerment. Students will gain hands-on experience with conducting user research, synthesizing findings into insights, ideating, sketching, rapid prototyping, and validating concepts with users. Course readings, discussions, and activities will be organized into a user-experience project to help students get out and interact with real users, needs, and challenges.

CRN: 11264
Instructor: Vacca
4 credits