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Communication and Media Studies Summer Courses

Classes listed as "online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during a portion of their scheduled meeting times with additional coursework to be completed asynchronously. Session III online courses are all asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus; however, the university will continue to implement the Flexible Hybrid Learning Environment to keep the community safe and allow for the possibility of remote attendance as necessary.


Fordham students please check courses in my.fordham.edu for the most accurate Attribute listings.

COMC 1101 L21 - Communication and Culture: Theory, History, and Methods
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TTh, 9 a.m.-10:15 a.m.

An introduction to the history, theory, and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This serves as the required introductory course for the major in Communication and Culture. It provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis.

CRN: 12583
Instructor: Patrick
4 credits


COMC 2112 R21 - Strategic Communication: Theory and Practice
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: MW, 6-9:45 p.m.

Introduction to strategic communication for students interested in advertising, public relations, health communications, social advocacy, and political campaigns. Presents today's best practices used to research, design, implement, and evaluate campaigns. Topics include: impact of the evolution of technology and the digital environment on delivery of campaigns, basic elements of a strategic media plan, ethics and regulation of strategic communications, and the role of strategic communications in the process of marketing products, people, ideas, and social causes.

CRN: 12584
Instructor: Durkin
4 credits


COMC 2117 PW1 - Language and Strategic Communication
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

Our use of language forms the basis of communication, whether the intent is to report or represent, persuade or promote, inform, instruct, or influence. Words and symbols serve as tools for thought and guides for action in communication to the public, within organizations, and among individuals. Understanding how we evaluate and respond to messages and information is essential to effective strategic communication. This course emphasizes pragmatic strategies for avoiding misevaluation and misunderstanding, resolving conflict, improving clarity of communication, and framing ideas and arguments, through analysis of the role of language and other codes in professional and personal environments.

Closed
Instructor: Strate
4 credits


COMC 2277 L11 - Media and Sexuality
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

By all accounts, we have witnessed an explosion of LGBTQ representation in the media over the last decade. This course critically examines the terms of this new visibility, and inquires into the exclusions that accompany the recognition of certain queer and trans subjects. Through the study of media, film, and popular culture, we will explore how representations of sex and sexuality are also central to the construction of ideas about race, class, gender, and nation.

Closed
Instructor: Moorman
4 credits


COMC 2329 L21 - Introduction to Media Industries
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

An overview of the mass media communication industries; examining such issues as the institutional, social, and technological histories of the media; the influence of economic factors in shaping content and issues governing regulatory policy.

CRN: 12585
Instructor: Hockenberry
3 credits


COMC 3114 L11 - Effective Speaking
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

A study of principles of effective communication with an emphasis on the role of public speaking skills in professional life, the importance of critical thinking to communication, and its significance in a democratic political system. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Freeman
4 credits


COMC 3247 L11 - Race, Class, and Gender in Media
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: Th, 9 a.m.-Noon

This class analyzes representations of social class, racial and ethnic identity, and gender and sexuality in media. We begin our work with two assumptions. First, that media both shape and are shaped by social conceptions. Second, that these categories—race, class, and gender—are embodied, that is, they describe different physical bodies that inhabit real, lived environments. From there, students learn to identify central themes and problems in representing differences of race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality in fiction and nonfiction media. The class will use a mixture of hands-on activities with contemporary media (such as blogging, journaling, and online discussion) plus more traditional readings about theories of representation and embodiment. The course is intended as a learning environment where students are able to do more than simply identify stereotypes. Rather, they intervene in these representations, actively critiquing stereotypes and moving past them towards a reflective attitude about the relationship between society as it is lived for people of different racial, sexual, and class groups—and the image of those groups as depicted in media. Fulfills the Pluralism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Schwartz
4 credits


COMC 3370 L11 - Ethical Issues in Media
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

Review of some basic ethical principles and examination of media-related issues such as freedom of expression, the right to privacy, and the public's right to know.

Closed
Instructor: Foley
4 credits


COMC 3375 L21 - Children and Media
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course explores the controversy surrounding children's media. Topics such as the role of media in socialization and learning, the effects of media content, and communication technologies on children's behavior, thought and emotions are examined. The functions that media perform for children, and the efforts to design media specifically for children are considered. Various forms such as television, popular music, film, video games, fairy tales, and children's literature are explored Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Silton
4 credits


COMC 3380 L21 - International Communication
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Comparative study of media systems of different countries. The role of the media in the formation of the concept of nationality. Theories of communication development and the debate around the international flow of information. How the media informs us about other countries and how, through the media, we form our conception of the world.

Closed
Instructor: Hockenberry
4 credits


COMC 4246 L11 - Media, Disability Futurity
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: Th, 1-4 p.m.

This interdisciplinary capstone course explores the theme of futurity through the lenses of media studies, disability studies, and narrative studies. Futurity is not just the stuff of science fiction, but is rather an integrated part of the rhetoric we use when imagining the kind of world we want to build. Media and other digital technologies are often a part of this narrative imagining, and with those tools we often imagine which bodies we might repair, represent, or rebuild. Using a variety of interpretive and analytical methods, students will ask what futures are available to which bodies and why; how bodies are figured as legibly human, and how dominant narratives enable or foreclose the full expression of a range of embodiments. The object of analysis is simultaneously representative, linguistic, narrative or historical: this course argues that any critical examination of embodiment necessarily touches upon not only key cultural studies categories such as race, class, gender and sexuality, but also upon the question of technology’s relationship to the body and its narrative figuring of health and flourishing. Students will finish the course with a nuanced understanding of how contemporary texts both visual and linguistic determine a shared cultural imagining of a better world, and how we might work to craft that image in a more inclusive and socially just way.

Closed
Instructor: Schwartz
4 credits


COMM 1000 R11 - Fundamentals of Communication and Media Studies
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: MW, 6-9:45 p.m.

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamental approaches, theories, and perspectives essential for an understanding of mediated communication, the industries that make it possible. Throughout the term, we will explore many ways in which our symbolic environment both reflects and shapes life in the 21st century, from interpersonal to international relations, and everything in between.

Closed
Instructor: Dozier
3 credits


DTEM 2417 L21 - Data Visualization
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 10 a.m.-Noon

Obtaining, interpreting, visualizing, and displaying data are essential skills for communication professionals in the 21st Century. This hands-on introductory course in data visualization will help students learn to use data to tell visual stories. Topics discussed will range from where to find data and how to evaluate sources to how to organize data to create visually appealing graphics that tell stories that can be grasped in an instant. Students will critique published visualizations to identify common pitfalls, as they create a data-based story to add to their portfolio.

CRN: 12588
Instructor: Vacca
4 credits


DTEM 2421 L11 - Digital Production for New Media
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTW, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Analysis and practice of visual design concepts as they apply to a wide range of digital software programs. The course generally covers photo editing, audio editing, video editing, desktop publishing, and basic website design. Classes are structured around individual production assignments with a focus on project management, composition, and layout.

Closed
Instructor: Katsafouros
4 credits


DTEM 2443 L11 - Fashion and Digital Media
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course examines what happens when one of the oldest forms of communication, fashion, meets up with the newest, digital media. Digital media has reconfigured the fashion industry: bloggers sit alongside famous magazine editors at Fashion Shows, the retail industry collapses as online shopping takes off, platforms such as Instagram reconfigure social status and power. While digital media creates new jobs, communities, celebrities, status and power in the fashion world, it also maintains and creates new social inequalities. We will examine the relationship between fashion and digital media from three vantage points: globally, locally, and personally. Our global focus considers the ways digital media creates new networks of production/labor/people; the local unit considers new jobs and identities (such as “influencers”) in the fashion industry, with special focus on New York City.

CRN: 12435
Instructor: Van Cleaf
4 credits


DTEM 2450 L11 - Digital Property Rights, Policies, and Practice
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TF, Noon-3 p.m.

This course will provide a general overview of copyright law specific to its impact on media and entertainment institutions, online platforms, and distribution channels. The course will examine copyright subject matter, ownership, duration, rights, licensing, infringement, and fair uses with a focus, in particular, on issue-identification and other analytical skills for professionals in practice.

Closed
Instructor: Klang
4 credits


DTEM 2452 L11 - Game Culture: Theory and Practice
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTW, 9 a.m.-Noon

Games are everywhere and over 155 million Americans play them regularly on tabletops and electronic devices across the county. Their prevalence has prompted the medium as a space for expression, art, and meaning-making. Moving beyond the notion of simple entertainment games are creating provocative experiences to promote change or understanding. This course emphasizes exploration and critical thinking as we discover how games are designed to address issues such as social justice, gender representation, behavioral change, and education. Through analyzing game artifacts and engaging in creative exercises, students will be able to think critically about games and how they are designed. Students will apply this literacy to their own game projects. This course is open to anyone who is interested in games and their possibilities.

CRN: 12596
Instructor: Vicari
4 credits


DTEM 4440 L21 - Privacy and Surveillance
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TF, Noon-3 p.m.

New technologies, from closed-circuit television cameras to large databases, have shifted the information landscape in ways that call into question cultural assumptions and social norms about sharing, visibility, and the very essence of privacy. Can we have privacy in the digital age? Is mass surveillance justified? Whose interests are being served, and who is at risk? This course is designed to promote student awareness of and sensitivity to the ethics, values, and latest developments in global privacy and surveillance.

Closed
Instructor: Klang
4 credits


DTEM 4480 L11 - Digital Media and Public Responsibility
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

An examination of the choices and responsibilities which shape personal identity and common humanity for those who regularly employ the tools of digital media and computer technology. Regular use of digital media enables individuals to separate from their physical selves and from the community spaces in which they have traditionally lived. This course focuses on the resulting ethical tensions.

Closed
Instructor: Levinson
4 credits


DTEM 4480 L21 - Digital Media and Public Responsibility
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

An examination of the choices and responsibilities which shape personal identity and common humanity for those who regularly employ the tools of digital media and computer technology. Regular use of digital media enables individuals to separate from their physical selves and from the community spaces in which they have traditionally lived. This course focuses on the resulting ethical tensions. Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 12591
Instructor: Levinson
4 credits


DTEM 4480 L22 - Digital Media and Public Responsibility
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

An examination of the choices and responsibilities which shape personal identity and common humanity for those who regularly employ the tools of digital media and computer technology. Regular use of digital media enables individuals to separate from their physical selves and from the community spaces in which they have traditionally lived. This course focuses on the resulting ethical tensions. Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Donovan
4 credits


FITV 1501 L21 - Understanding Film
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Examination of the aesthetics of film, its formal language, and structure. Screening and analysis of representative films. Study of film theory and criticism. Strongly recommended that students complete this course before other film courses. Lab fee.

CRN: 12629
Instructor: Shanitkvich
4 credits


FITV 2425 L21 - Digital Video Production I
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This introductory workshop class will teach the fundamentals of digital video production and cinematic storytelling. Students will learn concepts, techniques, and technologies pertaining to digital video and sound through hands-on production and post-production assignments. We will explore the aesthetics and the communicative potential of the medium through screenings, critiques, and exercises.

CRN: 12630
Instructor: Bordogna
4 credits


FITV 2501 L11 - History of Film: 1895-1950
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

A survey of film history from 1890 to 1950, looking at industrial practices and stylistic developments. The contribution of major national cinemas is also explored.

CRN: 12657
Instructor: Prettyman
4 credits


FITV 2511 L21 - Screenwriting I
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Analyzing and writing screenplays for theatrical motion pictures.

CRN: 12631
Instructor: Jennewein
4 credits


FITV 2511 L22 - Screenwriting I
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Analyzing and writing screenplays for theatrical motion pictures.

Closed
Instructor: Bordogna
4 credits


FITV 3554 L11 - African American Cinema
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

The success of movies such as Black Panther and the popular recognition of filmmakers like Ava DuVernay and Jordan Peele suggests that we have entered a new era of African American media representation. This class will explore African American cinema from the silent era to the contemporary moment. We will discuss African American participation in the mainstream film industry as well as the robust tradition of black independent cinema. Particular attention will be paid to the intersections of black aesthetics and cultural politics on screen; representations of blackness in relation to gender, sexuality, and class; and issues of spectatorship and identification as well as stardom and performance. Looking at the past and present terrain of African American cinema, we will interrogate the fundamental concept of Black film and imagine what its future holds.

CRN: 12660
Instructor: Prettyman
4 credits


FITV 3571 R21 - Science Fiction in Film and Television
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: Th, 9 a.m.-Noon

Sociological, cultural, and psychoanalytic analysis and criticism of the science fiction genre in cinema, television, radio, print, and other media.

CRN: 12633
Instructor: Strate
4 credits


FITV 3635 PW1 - Science Fiction From Page to Screen
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online: TTh, 3-5 p.m.

This course examines the unique, dynamic relationship between written words published as novels and short stories and their adaptation in TV series and motion pictures, in the genre of science fiction. Issues include the reader’s expectations about screen adaptations, the challenge of visualizing the impossible in science fiction, multiple movies from a single source, and books within books as a literary and cinematic device. The course will focus on a single iconic novel adapted into a multi-season TV series.

CRN: 12993
Instructor: Levinson
4 credits


FITV 3648 L11 - Television, Race, and Civil Rights
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised.” This was the rallying cry of Black radicals during times of national unrest, especially associated with the Black Power Movement. This course introduces students to the intersection of television, race, and civil rights broadly. How does U.S. TV engage with racial injustice and the fight for civil rights? How does the mass medium articulate pressing issues concerning the historical struggle for equality for African Americans? Students will engage with concepts in television studies as they connect to representations of racial Blackness on the small screen, paying special attention to TV texts, audiences, and industries. Topics discussed include mediations of protest, violence, and criminality in news media as well as social and political commentary in fictional programming.

CRN: 12464
Instructor: Monk-Payton
4 credits


FITV 4570 R11 - Films of Moral Struggle
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Fulfills the EP4 and Pluralism requirements in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Bromberg
4 credits


JOUR 1702 R11 - Introduction to Journalism
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

A course designed to introduce the student to various elements of reporting- including writing leads and articles and finding and interviewing sources- as well as the nature of news, the social role of the press, and the ethical and legal issues that face it. Students are encouraged to submit work to the college newspaper for possible publication.

CRN: 13388
Instructor: Hawkins
4 credits


JOUR 2789 R21 - Sports Broadcasting
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This class will provide a detailed study in all aspects of the sports broadcasting industry.  Students will be introduced to a wide array of techniques and philosophies for sports broadcasting, from fundamentals and essentials to advanced learning methods.  The course will consist of discussions, critiques, learning exercises, take home assignments and hands-on practice and participation. The course assumes no prior experience in sports broadcasting.

CRN: 13395
Instructor: Ciafardini
4 credits


JOUR 3788 L21 - International Reporting
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

For decades an aura has surrounded international correspondents, the corps of reporters who cover foreign governments, war fronts and conflict zones to bring the news out of some of the world’s most dangerous, complex and influential places. They risk lives and freedom in the struggle to dig out the truth behind government propaganda and military secrecy, whether in battlefields or presidential palaces or besieged regions. This course will define and explore the underpinnings of international reporting and its evolution from the mid-20th century to the digital age. Students will study and practice reporting, writing and video skills. We will examine the importance of understanding foreign cultures, histories and languages, discuss the work and lives of major foreign correspondents, and examine where the art of foreign correspondence stands today.

CRN: 12661
Instructor: Hawkins
4 credits


JOUR 4747 R11 - Special Topic: Reporting the Bronx
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This intermediate-advanced level journalism course will focus on the creation of content about the Bronx for the Bronx community. In this service learning course, students will be paired by the instructor with a Bronx media organization and spend most of their course time creating multimedia content about the borough, appropriate for that outlet. Weekly class meetings will focus on advanced writing and multiplatform reporting techniques that are appropriate for public service journalism. Students will also have required individual meetings with the professor to go over stories and review the student’s work experience with their client organization. Pre-req: JOUR 2711 or permission of the instructor is required.

CRN: 12690
Instructor: Knobel
4 credits


NMDD 1001 L11 - Explorations In New Media and Digital Designs
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course critically explores notable histories, geographies and practices of digital design.  Students will gain an understanding of fundamentals of contemporary design paradigms, internet architecture and governance and the politics of designing media that operates at intimate, local and global scales.

CRN: 13341
Instructor: Douglass
3 credits


NMDD 3150 L21 - Creative Coding
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 12:30-2:30 p.m.

This course will develop programming skills used in the digital humanities, all in the context of critical and cultural media studies. Students will learn basic coding concepts such as variables, loops, graphics, and analyzing sound data, and will connect them to current debates in the culture of coding. No previous coding experience is required.

CRN: 12685
Instructor: Vacca
4 credits