Sociology and Anthropology Summer Courses

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ANTH-1100-V11 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Online: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and the family, adaptions to the environment and to political, economic and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures.

CRN: 15067

Instructor: Maraesa, Aminata
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: FRSS, GLBL, INST, ISIN, SSCI


ANTH-1200-V21 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Online: MTWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

This introduction to biological anthropology satisfies a core life science requirement and serves as a general survey of the biological focus of anthropology. The course summarizes the different subdisciplines of biological anthropology and covers the history of evolutionary theories, human genetics and adaptation, primate biology, behavioral ecology and conservation, and an overview of the human fossil record. In particular, we emphasize the variations found in contemporary humans and non-human primates and the biological and cultural changes that took place in our ancestors over the past 7 million years. Lab sessions will provide a practical introduction to human osteology, primate morphology, primate conservation, and comparisons of human fossil morphology. Lab fee.

CRN: 15012

Instructor: Johnson, Caley
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: ENST, ESEL, ESLS, LSCI, ZLB1


ANTH-1300-R11 - Introduction to Archaeology
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

How do we study society when no living members of that culture remain? Students will examine the ways by which archaeologists have inferred former patterns of behavior from surviving evidence through a survey of traditional methods as well as new scientific techniques. Students will study artifacts from the University's collection and "excavate" their own archaeological site on paper to better understand the process of investigation.

CRN: 15807

Instructor: Venezia, Maria
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CLAS, FRSS, GLBL, IPE, MEST, SSCI


ANTH-2700-V11 - You Are What You Eat
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Online: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

As the center of all significant human rituals and ceremonies, food is studied by a range of natural and social scientists. For the anthropologist, food is connected to the human body, health social relations, identity, and even ideology; we are literally what we eat. This course examines the role food plays in shaping cultural practices throughout the world. Students will explore changing concepts of food through time, beginning with early humans, modes of food production, and consumption. Through primary literature, lectures, local ethnic markets, and sharing meals throughout the semester, this class will immerse you in the theoretical and empirical significance of the cross-cultural significance of food. Bon Appetit!

CRN: 14878

Instructor: Kleinman, Julie
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AMST, ASHS, ASSC, ENST, ESEL, ESHC, INST, IPE, ISEU


ANTH-4004-LP1 - Art Worlds: Anthropology and Sociology Perspectives
Summer Session II, July 8 - 18, 2024
Lincoln Center: MTWThF, 10:00AM - 04:00PM

Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City's cultural communities and institutions, this course will analyze many of the arts and artistic communities of New York City. The study of culture generally, aand art worlds more specifically, allows us to understand art and culture not only as aesthetic experiences, but also as institutional, economic, social and political phenomena. Our summer mid-day time slot will allow us to avail ourselves of numerous field trips and cultural excursions to support our discussions, readings, and lectures. This course currently fulfills an Interdisciplinary Capstone Core requirements for Fordham College students.

This course is open to high school students accepted into the Fordham Summer Leaders Academy as well as college students.

CRN: 15808

Instructor: Sawalha, Aseel
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ICC


ANTH-4490-L21 - Anthropology of Political Violence
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Lincoln Center: MTW, 05:30PM - 09:30PM

Political violence happens everyday, whether we endure it personally or hear about it through the media. But seldom do we ask ourselves what it is. This course investigates the nature of political violence and articulate its many forms from the anthropological perspectives of gender, class, ethnicity, economics, and of course, politics. Specific areas of study include Northern Ireland, Germany, Sudan, Palestine, Mexico, Argentina, China, Australia, and the U.S. The course will discuss the motivations for action (or inaction) by governments, elites, and insurgents, and students will get to know some of the organizations working against political violence. Field trips will include visits tothe United Nations, The United Holocaust Museum, and Ground Zero. Podcasts, news broadcasts, movies and audio documentation of events will provide further access to examples of global political violence.

CRN: 15838

Instructor: Gerard-Seif, Huda
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: AMST, APPI, ASHS, HHPA, HUST, ICC, INST, IPE, IRST, ISIN, PJST, PJWT


SOCI-1100-L21 - Introduction to Sociology
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course is required prior to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

CRN: 14998

Instructor: Rufrano, Michelle
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: FRSS, SSCI


SOCI-1100-V11 - Introduction to Sociology: Health
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Online: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course is required prior to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

CRN: 15884

Instructor: Durkin, Daniel
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: FRSS, SSCI


SOCI-2847-V21 - The 60s: Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Online: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

The 1960's was one of the most tumultuous eras in American history, marked by a revolutionary movement led by youth struggling for freedom on many levels. African Americans, with white support, struggled against the oppression of racial segregation of the South in the Civil Rights movement: young people sought sexual freedom and the right to experiment with drugs; musicians broke away from the restraints of traditional pop and folk songs and created rock and roll; politically minded youth attacked the traditional institutions of political and economic power by protesting against the war in Vietnam; women challenged traditional male attitudes that confined them to domesticity or inferior status in the work place and in society; gays organized against the repressive laws and prejudices against homosexuality. This course will show how all of these social strands intertwined using films, music and writings from the era.

CRN: 15031

Instructor: Wormser, Richard
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASHS, ASSC, WGSS


SOCI-2925-V21 - Media, Crime, Sex, and Violence
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Online: MTWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Turn on the television set, pick up the local newspaper, go on the Internet or watch a movie. Wherever you turn, you will find the media saturated with stories about corrupt cops and honest cops, drug dealers and drug users, murderers and victims, organized crime and serial killers, crusading district attorneys and defense attorneys, corrupt lawyers and hanging judges, violent prisoners and convicted innocents. How accurate are these representations? What are the ideological messages and cultural values these stories communicate? In this course, you will learn how to demystify media representations in order to understand how and why they are produced, and who is responsible for their production.

CRN: 15013

Instructor: Wormser, Richard
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASHS, ASSC, PJMJ, PJST, URST, WGSS


SOCI-2960-L11 - Popular Culture
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

This course will investigate the nature of contemporary popular culture. How do people spend their "spare time"? Does this vary with social class? Is sport the new religion? And how does this differ from that of earlier periods and simpler societies? (Every year)

CRN: 14806

Instructor: McGee, Michelle
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASHS, ASSC, URST


SOCI-4004-LP1 - Art Worlds: Anthropology and Sociology Perspectives
Summer Session II, July 8 - 18, 2024
Lincoln Center: MTWThF, 10:00AM - 04:00PM

The study of culture generally, and art world more specifically, allows us to understand the arts not only as aesthetics experiences, but also as institutional, economics, social, and political phenomena. Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City’s cultural communities and institutions, the course will introduce students to issues in and methods for cultural analysis. The analysis of art worlds will include: 1) a consideration of the intentions of creative agents or producers; 2) the distribution of these objects within particular systems; and, 3) the reception and interpretation of these objects by and within particular social groups or communities.

This course is open to high school students accepted into the Fordham Summer Leaders Academy as well as college students.

CRN: 15809

Instructor: McGee, Michelle
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: AMST, APPI, ICC


SOCI-4900-L31 - Internship Seminar
Summer Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2024
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: M, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Placement in a work setting of their choice provides students with an opportunity to assess their own career goals, while simultaneously enriching their understanding of how social groups function. Issues and topics from the sociology of formal organizations, including work role socialization, the organization as a social system, the bureaucracy and its public, formal and social processes in organizations, managerial ideologies and the relation between character and career are discussed. Placements must be obtained through the Internship Program located in the Career Planning and Placement Office.

CRN: 15110

Instructor: Young, Holly
4 credits


SOCI-4971-V11 - Dilemmas of the Modern Self
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Online: MTWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

Modern selfhood or identity is studied as a series of conflicts or dilemmas "What is a self today?" What are the special problems of ourselves as modern and post-modern "subjects?"

CRN: 14880

Instructor: Durkin, Daniel
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: AMST, APPI, ASHS, EP4, VAL

Classes listed as either Lincoln Center or Rose Hill will meet on-campus only.

Classes listed as "Online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during their scheduled meeting times. Students in different time zones should plan accordingly. Session III online courses are asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus at the times indicated; additional online work will also be required.