Graduate Arts and Sciences Summer Courses

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Center for Society and Ethics

CEED-5600-L11 - Special Topics in Ethics and Society
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Lincoln Center: TBA

Graduate course. This course will provide students with interdisciplinary perspectives on contemporary issues in ethics and society across the humanities and the social and natural sciences. Class readings and discussions will provide students with the tools to apply ethical principles, theories, and decision-making to issues of social import across diverse contexts and populations.

CRN: 14969

Instructor: TBA
0 credit

Fordham course attributes: CETH, PSIC


Communications and Media Studies

PMMA-5001-V21 - Public Media Theory and Practice
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Online: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. Serving as a core introductory course for the Public Media MA program, this class examines central topics in the study and practice of media in the public interest. Students consider what is the role of media and communication in promoting (or constraining) positive social change, and what unique roles do journalists and strategic communication professionals play throughout this process? What do we mean, exactly, by concepts such as public media, the public interest, social justice, and civic engagement? How do historical and contemporary power dynamics, information technologies, and economic structures shape the types of stories that dominate the public sphere, and how do resistant voices find ways to disrupt those narratives over time? Course readings and multimedia materials are drawn from a wide variety of academic disciplines and professional sectors, while course assignments ask students to grapple with real-world topics, aiming to not only analyze social problems but also identify potential solutions.

CRN: 15052

Instructor: Levinson, Paul
3 credits

PMMA-5106-L21 - Race, Gender, and Digital Media
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: TTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. This course examines the theory, history, politics, and aesthetics of digital media. We will utilize an intersectional feminist approach to explore race, gender, and broader questions of identity and difference from early computing to social networking. Topics include diversity in the tech industry, virtual communities, and online activism. Ultimately, the class will discuss the role that digital media plays in promoting—or preventing—civic engagement and social change.

CRN: 15824

Instructor: Kulkarni, Kavita
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CEED, CENS, PMTC, PSIC, URSG


Computer Science

CISC-5380-V21 - Programming with Python
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Online: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. This course is an introduction to the Python programming language for students without prior programming experience. Students will learn how to use Python both interactively and through a script. The topics covered include variables, strings, numbers, control statements (conditional statements and loops), lists and sequences, functions, dictionaries, recursive functions, classes, and iterators and generators. Python is a programming language with a relatively simple syntax and a powerful set of libraries. After completion of this course, students will be competent in using Python libraries to process numerical and textual data. Working with Python packages for statistical and numerical data analysis, as well as the natural language processing problems, is explored. Matplotlib, a Python 2D plotting library which produces publication-quality figures in a variety of hard-copy formats, is used throughout the course.Graduate.

CRN: 15095

Instructor: TBA
3 credits

CISC-5550-V21 - Cloud Computing
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Online: TTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. This course provides the needed knowledge to understand the technologies and services that enable cloud computing, discusses different types of cloud computing models and investigates security and legal issues associated with cloud computing. Topics include Cloud infrastructure components and interfaces, essential characteristics of Cloud platforms, common deployment modes, techniques for deploying and scaling cloud resources and security implication of cloud resources.

CRN: 15121

Instructor: TBA
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CSNS, CSSS, CYSM, DATA, EDDS

CISC-5900-V11 - Information Fusion
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Online: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. A study of the structure and function of information fusion. Efficient and effective combination of data or information from a variety of diverse sources, sensors, features, and decisions. Applications and case studies of information fusion and decision making to a plethora of disciplines including science and engineering, cybersecurity and digital networks, medicine and health, social choices and human cognition, business and finance, and management and innovation. Lab fee.

CRN: 15091

Instructor: Hsu, Derbiau
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CSAI, CSDA, DATI, DCDF, EDDS, PMTM, ZLB3

CISC-6080-V31 - Capstone Project in Data Science
Summer Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2024
Online: W, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. The goal of this class is to sharpen students’ skills in data science by designing and implementing a capstone project. Through this class, students should gain a deep understanding of state-of-the-art data science technologies and current knowledge. Students are required to finish a large capstone project and are expected to present and write one or more research papers in this class.

CRN: 15098

Instructor: Weiss, Gary
3 credits

CISC-6170-V31 - Special Topics in Data Science
Summer Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2024
Online, Asynchronous

Graduate course. This course concentrates on special state-of-the-art topics in the field of data science. The course content will change from semester to semester.

CRN: 15146

Instructor: Weiss, Gary
3 credits

CISC-6500-V11 - Bioinformatics
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Online: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. This course studies the relation of (interaction between) molecular biology and information science and the impact and applications of combinatorics, computing, and informatics on the biomedical sciences and clinical processes. Topics include: DNA sequence and alignment, database searching and data analysis, phylogenetic analysis and evolution, genomic and proteomics, structure and function, gene regulatory networks and metabolic pathways, microarray technology, and gene expression algorithms.

CRN: 15122

Instructor: TBA
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CSAT, CSDA, DATA

CISC-6600-V31 - Cloud Computing Security
Summer Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2024
Online: Sat, 02:00PM - 06:00PM

Graduate course. Cloud computing has evolved as a very emerging computing model and is now becoming a backbone of the IT industry and business, opening the opportunity for on-demand, highly elastic, and infinite computing power with scalability and supporting the delivery of mission-critical enterprise applications and services. Security poses significant challenges in cloud computing environments. This course starts with ground-up coverage on the high-level concepts of cloud landscape, architectural principles, techniques, and real-world best practices applied to cloud service providers and consumers. Then, the course will describe the cloud security architecture, security problems, and techniques, and explore the guiding security design principles and industry security standards. Finally, the course delves deep into the secure cloud architectural aspects, including comprehensive data protection, end-to-end identity management and access control, and monitoring and auditing processes. The course will have project works on important problems providing exposure to scientific research in cloud computing security.

CRN: 15100

Instructor: Bhuiyan, Zakirul Alam
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CSCY, CYSM, DCCF

CISC-6630-V31 - Wireless Security
Summer Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2024
Online: Sat, 09:00AM - 01:00PM

Graduate course. The goal of this course is to provide students a theoretical foundation and robust technical details in wireless security. It covers topics in wireless network basics, principles of wireless network attacks, wireless intrusion detection systems, deploying wireless networks, defense for securing wireless networks, malwares in wireless networks, Rogue wireless network detection, cloud-based wireless solutions, and related techniques.

CRN: 15101

Instructor: Bhuiyan, Zakirul Alam
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CSCY, CSNS, CSSS, CYSM


Economics

ECON-5006-V11 - Programming Economics and Finance
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Online: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. This course introduces the student to various computer programs and their applications in economics and in finance. The course begins with a general review of programming skills using MATLAB. It then presents other statistical and econometric packages such as SAS and STATA. The course concludes with a review of the LATEX program.

CRN: 14970

Instructor: Rengifo Minaya, Erick
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: EDFI

ECON-5020-R21 - African Economic Development
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Rose Hill: TTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. The key objective of this course is to develop an understanding of the economic development problems of Africa, the trade patterns and financial relationships of Africa to the rest of the world. With examples, application, and country case studies, the course covers major development challenges and the possible solutions, the growing influence of African economics in industrialized and developing countries as well as future prospects.

CRN: 15049

Instructor: Themeli, Booi
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: HULI

ECON-5040-R11 - Strategic Financial Management
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Rose Hill: TTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. This course provides students with an introduction to the basic questions facing an investor evaluating firm policy. It covers debt/equity choice, dividend policy, and principle-agent problems within the firm as well as the value of the firm under different financial and managerial structures. Current research is surveyed to determine how investors interpret various financial arrangements such as dividend policy, taxes, and stock offerings. Specific attention will be paid to information and incentives of each party in a financial contract in the context of structuring the firm, running the firm efficiently, and if all else fails, bankruptcy.

CRN: 14971

Instructor: Rengifo Minaya, Erick
3 credits

ECON-5415-V11 - Gender and Economic Development
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Online: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. In this course, students analyze the social nature of gender and economic development from a cross-cultural perspective. Topics include household labor, occupational segregation and earnings, inequality in market work, poverty, family structure, public policy, and gender equity. The course draws on material from economics and other social sciences to analyze the social nature of gender and economic development in a cross-cultural perspective. Topics include women's household labor; occupational segregation and earnings inequality in market work; the intersections of gender, class, race, and ethnicity; women and poverty; family structure; public policy and gender equity.

CRN: 14975

Instructor: Combs, Mary Beth
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CEED, CENS, EDAM, HULI, PSIC

ECON-5540-R21 - Emerging Markets
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Rose Hill: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. This course is intended primarily for IPED students interested in analyzing the dynamics of emerging financial markets in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. It compliments POGA 6991- Political Risk Analysis. Students must prepare a study of one country's basic macroeconomic performance, foreign exchange market, and stock market. The use of a computer and the internet are incorporated into the course to gather data and analyze it statistically. Intended primarily for IPED students, this course explores the dynamics of emerging financial markets in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America. Complementing and expanding upon the skills learned in POGA 6991 Political Risk Analysis, students learn how to prepare a country study regarding their country's leading macroeconomic indicators, the stability of its foreign exchange market, and the likely returns and risks associated with its stock market. Real-time data is obtained from the university's Bloomberg Terminal and the internet. Additional data is available from standard written and CD-ROM statistical sources. Students are taught how to analyze this data using standard statistical software to forecast trends as well as to estimate returns, volatility, and cross-correlations. An optimal portfolio of equity investments in emerging markets is estimated. Students also analyze the dynamics of emerging financial markets in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America.

CRN: 15050

Instructor: Schwalbenberg, Henry
3 credits

ECON-5771-R11 - Project Assessment
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Rose Hill: TTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

Graduate course. Uses the logical framework analysis frequently mandated by USAID to design a results based system to monitor and evaluate small community development projects.

CRN: 14972

Instructor: Schwalbenberg, Henry
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: HUCB


History

HIST-5205-V31 - The Fall of the Roman Empire
Summer Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2024
Online, Asynchronous

Graduate course. This graduate seminar introduces students to the historiographical paradigm of the "decline and fall" of the Roman Empire and examines modern responses to it.

CRN: 15789

Instructor: Bruce, Scott
4 credits

Fordham course attributes:

HIST-5214-R11 - Women and Gender in Medicine in Europe and North America
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Rose Hill: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. The period between the Renaissance and the French Revolution (roughly 1450 to 1800) witnessed an explosion of ideas about the natural world, especially the human body. Some of them were new, but many others were a reinvigoration and repackaging of older ideas about generation and sexual difference from the classical world. Within this context, men and women of varying ranks participated in the generation of knowledge about the body, with concerns that spanned the medicinal attributes of plants and animals from the New World to the processes of reproduction. Yet these two developments—the explosion of knowledge about the body and a parade of new participants investigating and healing it—did not occur in an isolated bubble of science. They took place alongside European expansion; the dispossession of Native Americans; the growth and rationalization of slavery as a labor regime; the birth of new institutions of science and learning that replaced more traditional venues for the creation and transmission of knowledge; civil wars and revolutions that challenged patriarchy, the growth of capitalism, and the institution of slavery. These major historical changes involved questions about reproduction (of the labor force), women’s bodies, women’s medical authority, and the value of carework. Modernity proceeded through the body. This course explores the place of women as healthcare providers and interpreters of the body in this period. Simultaneously, it probes how ideas about gender, sexual difference, and race emerged in this period of cataclysmic change. As a graduate reading seminar, the course will focus on reading and discussion of secondary scholarship on these topics. Assignments will include in-class presentations on select readings, and a final seminar paper.

CRN: 15784

Instructor: Gherini, Claire
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: HGSM


Latin

LATN-5090-V11 - Latin for Reading
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Online: MW, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

Graduate course. A course designed for graduate students seeking a reading knowledge of Latin in their discipline. Some prior study of Latin is desirable but not necessary.

CRN: 15080

Instructor: McGowan, Matthew
0 credit

Fordham course attributes: Z413

LATN-5093-V21 - Ecclesiastical Latin
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Online: MW, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

Graduate course. This course is a study of the grammatical structure, form, and vocabulary of Church Latin, focusing on the Bible, the Church fathers, and medieval thinkers.

CRN: 15081

Instructor: McGowan, Matthew
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: MTAM, MVSG


Political Science

POSC-6991-R11 - Political Risk Analysis
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Rose Hill: MW, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. This course is primarily a research/writing course that culminates in an original paper where you will be required to analyze the political risks associated with a country of your choosing. While there will be only a minimal number of lectures, the instructor will serve as your individual mentor as you develop and present your paper. As part of the process of writing this paper, you will study methods used to assess and manage the political risks associated with foreign investment and international business; learn how to assess the domestic political climate of a country by examining factors such as the levels of political violence, the stability of the government, and the existence of political democracy, and make an overall assessment of a country's economic climate by evaluating key macroeconomic indicators. You will also learn the importance of studying foreign relations of a country in order to evaluate the likelihood of any conflict it might have with its neighbors.

CRN: 14973

Instructor: Porter, Geoffrey
3 credits


Psychology

PSYC-5200-R11 - Fixing Psychology's Replication Crisis
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Rose Hill: MW, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

Graduate course. This course is an introduction to the open science approach to psychology. We will trace the origins of a “replication crisis” that shook the field over the past 10 years. This involves understanding some faulty research practices and misguided incentives within the discipline that arguably undermined the scientific process. We engage those issues primarily by reviewing “autopsies” of some psychological findings that have been challenged recently. Then we explore some reform practices that are intended to foster a more transparent, reproducible, and accurate research enterprise. Our ultimate goal is to help you to figure out whether open science practices might enhance the ways you “do” and consume research, the way that you teach undergraduates and interact with peers when conducting or analyzing research, and how you might advocate for reform in your own academic networks.

CRN: 15796

Instructor: Conway, Christopher
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CLMB, PMPE, PMTM, PSIC

PSYC-6066-R21 - History and Systems
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Rose Hill: MW, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

Graduate course. This course surveys the history of the major systems of psychology from pre-Socratic philosophers to contemporary cognitive science and neuroscience. Key men and women who contributed to the development of theories about and methods used to study personality, emotion, intelligence, cognition, and psychobiology are discussed within their historical, religious, cultural, and political contexts.

CRN: 15051

Instructor: Mattson, Mark
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CEED, CENS, CLMB, PSIC

PSYC-6137-R21 - Personality Assessment II
Summer Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2024
Rose Hill: MW, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

Graduate course. This course involves the use of projective instruments to assess personality functioning including an overview of the research base, administration, scoring, and interpretation of selected projective instruments. The primary assessment covered in this course is the Rorschach (e.g., administration, scoring, and interpretation).

CRN: 15797

Instructor: TBA
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CPAE, CPCE

PSYC-6184-R11 - Behavioral Assessment with Lab
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Rose Hill: Lecture TTh, 09:00APM - 12:00PM
                       Lab W, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

Graduate course. This course will establish an understanding of behavioral assessment and its implications for intervention, evaluation and research. Theoretical foundations, methods, and application of behavioral assessment to case formulation and treatment will be emphasized.

CRN: 15798

Instructor: Andover, Margaret
0 credit

Fordham course attributes: CLRM, CPAE, CPCE

PSYC-6184-R11 - Behavioral Assessment with Lab
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Lecture/Lab, Rose Hill: TTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

Graduate course. This course will establish an understanding of behavioral assessment and its implications for intervention, evaluation and research. Theoretical foundations, methods, and application of behavioral assessment to case formulation and treatment will be emphasized.

CRN: 15798

Instructor: Andover, Margaret
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CLRM, CPAE, CPCE

PSYC-7990-R11 - The Teaching of Psychology
Summer Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2024
Rose Hill: WTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

Graduate course. Theory and practice of college teaching will be reviewed. Topics will include lecturing, demonstrations, assessment methods, out of class writing assignments, syllabus preperation, local requirements and values

CRN: 14974

Instructor: TBA
3 credits

Classes listed as either Lincoln Center or Rose Hill will meet on-campus only.

Classes listed as "Online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during their scheduled meeting times. Students in different time zones should plan accordingly. Session III online courses are asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus at the times indicated; additional online work will also be required.