English Summer Courses

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ENGL 1101 R11 - Composition I
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Rose Hill: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

Instruction in sentence and paragraph construction, reading comprehension skills and analysis, the basic principles of grammar with an emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems, and principles of argumentation and evidence. Weekly assignments and regular grammar exercises to build confidences and competence in college writing.

CRN: 13825
Instructor: Finn-Atkins, Alexandra
3 credits


ENGL 1101 R21 - Composition I
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Rose Hill: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Instruction in sentence and paragraph construction, reading comprehension skills and analysis, the basic principles of grammar with an emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems, and principles of argumentation and evidence. Weekly assignments and regular grammar exercises to build confidences and competence in college writing.

CRN: 14716
Instructor: Carpenter, Leslie
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R11 - Composition II
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Rose Hill: TWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

CRN: 13753
Instructor: Furry, Angela
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L21 - Composition II
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

CRN: 13827
Instructor: Campbell, Kyle
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R21 - Composition II
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Rose Hill: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

CRN: 13829
Instructor: Forbes, Madison
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R22 - Composition II
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Rose Hill: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

CRN: 14717
Instructor: Northrop, Martin
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L11 - Texts and Contexts: American Horror Stories
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

This course will examine the genre of horror in American literature and culture through the study of fiction, film, and television. Drawing on theoretical frameworks from literary, film, and cultural studies, we will explore the aesthetic qualities and narrative conventions of the horror genre and the social formations and anxieties that inform it as we study works from the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries.

CRN: 13754
Instructor: D'Onofrio, Jessica
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: EP2, TC


ENGL 2000 V11 - Texts and Contexts: Writing the Self: Life, Narrative, Fiction
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: TWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

Writing about yourself may seem like a simple task: after all, whom do you know better? But choices and questions abound. What is the boundary between fact and fiction? To what degree is personal life also social or political? What is the “self”? In this class, we will explore various practices of writing the self through genres like poetry, essay, graphic narrative, and novel. We’ll also tackle issues like authorship, representation, and the construction (or deconstruction) of identity. In particular, we’ll see how authors have used life narratives to challenge the canon, which has often marginalized and excluded voices based on their ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and race. We will also look at how authors have experimented with form to tell their stories and address issues of difference, culture, history, and politics. Authors will include Audre Lorde, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Alison Bechdel, Maggie Nelson, and Sara Ahmed.

Closed
Instructor: Ghosh, Anwita
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: EP2, TC


ENGL 2000 V12 - Texts and Contexts: Reimagining Medieval Worlds
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

This class will explore how historical and fictional medieval worlds have been imagined and reimagined throughout history and through various literary genres. Through close readings of key literary works and criticism, we will not only contend with the flagrant misuse of medieval symbolism, but also question the seemingly benign dominant understandings of the medieval past that further systemic marginalization and devaluation of vulnerable populations.

Closed
Instructor: Ray, Jason
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: EP2, TC


ENGL 2000 L21 - Texts and Contexts: Monster Cultures in Global Fiction and Film
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

In Monster Theory, Jeffrey Cohen writes that “the monster is born only at this metaphoric crossroads, as an embodiment of a certain cultural moment—of a time, a feeling, a place.” The 20th and early 21st centuries are filled with a particular kind of monster, one that could have only been born from globalization. In Japanese, this kind of monster is called kaiju, a word literally meaning “strange beast.” Kaiju are often what English speakers call giant monsters: King Kong, Godzilla, Gamera, etc. In this course, we will examine the roles kaiju have played in both American culture and global culture. We will analyze both fiction and film, focusing on the translation of monsters from literature to film and from one culture to another.

CRN: 13830
Instructor: Clark, Nicholas
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: EP2, TC


ENGL 2000 R21 - Texts and Contexts: Secret Agents: Film, Fiction, Themes
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Rose Hill: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

In this class, we will read and analyze texts and films in a variety of genres that feature espionage and related themes: duplicity, disguise, surveillance, gender, and nation. In looking at productions from medieval romance to revisionist spoofs, we will consider the evolving historical, social, and intellectual forces that shape our cultural perceptions of the “secret world” and challenge the generic conventions of who—or what—an “agent” can be. By developing skills in close reading and analysis, we will explore how spy fictions and films conceptualize the “secret agent” and navigate the complex boundaries between individual and state autonomy, agency, and secrecy.

CRN: 13833
Instructor: Smigen-Rothkopf, David
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: EP2, TC


ENGL 2000 V21 - Texts and Contexts: Money, Sex, and Power
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Online: TWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

This course will explore issues of money, sex, and power in British literature of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.

Closed
Instructor: Monsam, Angela
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: EP2, TC


CLAS 2000 R11 - Texts and Contexts: Myth In Greco-Roman Literature
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Rose Hill: TWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

An introduction to the literary analysis of texts and the cultural and historical contexts within which they are produced and read. Significant class time will be devoted to critical writing and to speaking about literature. Each section of Texts and Contexts will have a focus developed by the individual instructor and expressed in its subtitle.

CRN: 13731
Instructor: Burns, Christopher
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: EP2, TC


MLAL 2000 L21 - Texts and Contexts: Narratives of the Italian Nation
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

This course examines the way in which the literary and artistic forms of modern Italy represent political and social movements such as revolution, unification, modernization, and migration. We will focus on texts from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries that utilize differing modes -- such as fiction, nonfiction, film, poetry, and music -- and we will analyze how these texts draw upon, reflect and refashion the meaning of historical events. In juxtaposing texts of different types, we will explore the mechanisms by which symbols and ideas are inherited through and adapted to differing contexts. Taught in English.

Canceled
Instructor: Lapenta Long, Kathleen
3 credits


ENGL 3152 L21 - Race and Religion From Beowulf To Wuthering Heights
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

How can we talk about depictions of difference in literature? We will attend to this question by reading texts depicting racial and religious difference alongside critical race studies to examine the logic and paradoxes of difference. Texts will include "Beowulf," Chaucer’s “Man of Law’s Tale” and “Prioress’s Tale,” Shakespeare’s "Othello," Marlowe’s "The Jew of Malta," and Emily Brontë’s "Wuthering Heights." Critics discussed will include Geraldine Heng, Henry Louis Gates Jr., and Toni Morrison.

CRN: 13835
Instructor: Cargile, Elizabeth
4 credits


ENGL 3523 V11 - Very Contemporary American Fiction
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

This course will consider a diverse range of acclaimed literary novels by American writers published roughly within the past five years. We will examine what makes these novels innovative in form, narrative voice, or subject matter; their relation to genre and tradition; and the reasons for their commercial and critical success. We will also explore their critical reception and the form of the book review, and students will write their own reviews of assigned novels.

CRN: 13757
Instructor: Cahill, Edward
4 credits


ENGL 3653 R21 - Major American Authors
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

This course provides an introduction to major American authors.

Canceled
Instructor: Campbell, Kyle
4 credits


ENGL 4096 PW1 - Hobbits/Heroes/Hubris
Summer Session III, May 31 - August 4, 2022
Online, Asynchronous

Centering on Tolkein’s "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings," this course will examine heroes and heroines, with all their cultural, philosophical, and individual limitations. We will take a close look in particular at epic journeys in order to tease out the ever-changing definition of heroism. What are the boundaries of heroic figures’ ethics and morality, and what happens when they get crossed? How do heroes and heroines walk the fine line between self-confidence and hubris?

Closed
Instructor: Papp, Vivian
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: EP4, MVLI, MVST, VAL


ENGL 4150 L11 - Race and Contemporary Film
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

This course examines contemporary cinema in an effort to understand the racial present. Drawing on theories and methods from sociology, anthropology, history, and literary theory, we will develop a provisional model of interdisciplinary cultural analysis that will help us better understand how representations of race function in our own historical moment. At the same time, we will investigate exactly what constitutes “our own historical moment.” What is the historical present? How and why does it differ from one racial group to the next? And how do these competing racial temporalities affect present-day racial politics? With such questions in mind, we will conduct a series of case studies in racial representation. Each case will be organized around a recent film, and each film will be examined from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, with particular emphasis on how various academic disciplines both illuminate and obscure various aspects of the racial representation at hand.

CRN: 13758
Instructor: Kim, James
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: COLI, ENRJ, ICC, PLUR


ENGL 4228 V11 - Black Protest From Slavery To #BlackLivesMatter
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: MTWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

This course will consider the canon of African American literature through an expansive definition of protest. We will examine how the meaning of protest has evolved from the 18th century to the present. As we interrogate the relationship between Blackness and protest, we will also discuss how that history has consistently shaped American identity.

CRN: 13759
Instructor: Tyler, Dennis
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AFAM, AMST, APPI, ASLT, COLI, ENRJ, EP4, VAL

Classes listed as either Lincoln Center or Rose Hill will meet on-campus only. Classes listed as "Online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during their scheduled meeting times. Students in different time zones should plan accordingly. Session III online courses are asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus at the times indicated; additional online work will also be required.