Communication and Media Studies Summer Courses

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COMC 1101 L21 - Communication and Culture: History, Theory Methods
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

An introduction to the history, theory and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This serves as the required introductory course for the major in Communication and Culture. It provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis.

CRN: 13778
Instructor: D'Aiello, Alan
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASAM, ASHS, DISA, DTEM, DTMM


COMC 2117 PW1 - Language and Strategic Communication
Summer Session III, May 31 - August 4, 2022
Online, Asynchronous

Our use of language forms the basis of communication, whether the intent is to report or represent, persuade or promote, inform, instruct, or influence. Words and symbols serve as tools for thought and guides for action in communication to the public, within organizations, and among individuals. Understanding how we evaluate and respond to messages and information is essential to effective strategic communication. This course emphasizes pragmatic strategies for avoiding misevaluation and misunderstanding, resolving conflict, improving clarity of communication, and framing ideas and arguments, through analysis of the role of language and other codes in professional and personal environments.

CRN: 13959
Instructor: Strate, Lance
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: CCMS, LING


COMC 2277 V11 - Media and Sexuality
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

By all accounts, we have witnessed an explosion of LGBTQ representation in the media over the last decade. This course critically examines the terms of this new visibility, and inquires into the exclusions that accompany the recognition of certain queer and trans subjects. Through the study of media, film and popular culture, we will explore how representations of sex and sexuality are also central to the construction of ideas about race, class, gender, and nation.

Closed
Instructor: Moorman, Jennifer
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: CCUS, EP3, WGSS


COMC 2329 V11 - Introduction To Media Industries
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: TWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

An overview of the mass media communication industries; examining such issues as the institutional, social and technological histories of the media; the influence of economic factors in shaping content and issues governing regulatory policy.

CRN: 13732
Instructor: Hockenberry, Matthew
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: AMST, ASAM, CMST, JOUR, SSCI


COMC 3114 V11 - Effective Speaking
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

A study of principles of effective communication with emphasis on the role of public speaking skills in professional life, the importance of critical thinking to communication and its significance in a democratic political system.

CRN: 13733
Instructor: Freeman, Lewis
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: CCMS, JOUR, EP3


COMC 3247 L11 - Race, Class, and Gender In Media
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MTWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

This class analyzes representations of social class, racial and ethnic identity, and gender and sexuality in media. We begin our work with two assumptions. First, that media both shape and are shaped by social conceptions. Second, that these categories—race, class, and gender—are embodied, that is, they describe different physical bodies that inhabit real, lived environments. From there, students learn to identify central themes and problems in representing differences of race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality in fiction and nonfiction media. The class will use a mixture of hands-on activities with contemporary media (such as blogging, journaling, and online discussion) plus more traditional readings about theories of representation and embodiment. The course is intended as a learning environment where students are able to do more than simply identify stereotypes. Rather, they intervene in these representations, actively critiquing stereotypes and moving past them towards a reflective attitude about the relationship between society as it is lived for people of different racial, sexual, and class groups—and the image of those groups as depicted in media.

CRN: 13734
Instructor: Schwartz, Margaret
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AFAM, AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASSC, CCUS, CMST, COLI, DISA, HCWL, HUST, LALS, LASS, PJMJ, PJST, PLUR, WGSS


COMM 3701 PW1 - Summer Media Internship Seminar
Summer Session III, May 31 - August 4, 2022
Online, Asynchronous

In this course we explore the development of a life’s work in the context of broader issues in the contemporary media workplace, broadly defined. Through asynchronous discussion, exercises, readings, and reflections, we will examine students’ own experiences in contemporaneous internships, exploring subjects including finding meaning in your work, diversity in the workplace, connecting with mentors and role models, identifying your workplace values, and more. As much as possible, this course will cater to the particular needs and professional ideals of the students enrolled.

CRN: 14105
Instructor: Mowlabocus, Sharif
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: CMST, COMC, DTEM, FITV, JOUR


DTEM 2421 V11 - Digital Production For New Media
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: MTW, 09:00AM - 01:00PM

This course focuses on analysis and practice of visual design concepts as they apply to a wide range of digital software programs. The course generally covers photo editing, audio editing, video editing, desktop publishing, and basic website design. Classes are structured around individual production assignments with a focus on project management, composition, and layout.

CRN: 13735
Instructor: Katsafouros, Catherine
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: JOUR, NMAC, NMAT, NMDD, NMMI, ZLB2


DTEM 2452 L21 - Game Culture: Theory Practice
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MTWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

Games are everywhere and over 155 million Americans play them regularly on tabletops and electronic devices across the county. Their prevalence has prompted the medium as a space for expression, art, and meaning-making. Moving beyond the notion of simple entertainment games are creating provocative experiences to promote change or understanding. This course emphasizes exploration and critical thinking as we discover how games are designed to address issues such as social justice, gender representation, behavioral change, and education. Through analyzing game artifacts and engaging in creative exercises, students will be able to think critically about games and how they are designed. Students will apply this literacy into their own game projects. This course is open to anyone who is interested in games and their possibilities.

CRN: 13808
Instructor: Vicari, Christopher
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: AMST, ASAM, NMAT, NMDD


DTEM 4440 V21 - Privacy and Surveillance
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Online: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

New technologies, from closed-circuit television cameras to large databases, have shifted the information landscape in ways that call into question cultural assumptions and social norms about sharing, visibility, and the very essence of privacy. Can we have privacy in the digital age? Is mass surveillance justified? Whose interests are being served, and who is at risk? This course is designed to promote student awareness of and sensitivity to the ethics, values, and latest developments in global privacy and surveillance.

CRN: 13807
Instructor: Klang, Mathias
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASHS, CELP, NMAC, NMAT, NMDD, NMMI


DTEM 4480 R21 - Digital Media and Public Responsibility
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

An examination of the public cultures, goods, and problems that emerge from the ongoing integration of digital media into everyday life. This course goes beyond a traditional focus on personal problems and responsibilities to explore how publics have and can take collective responsibility to address structural inequities in a digital society.

CRN: 13809
Instructor: D'Aiello, Alan
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASHS, CELP, EP4, JETH, JOUR, NMDD, NMDE, VAL, ZLB2


FITV 2425 R11 - Digital Video Production I For FITV
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 09:00AM - 01:00PM

This introductory workshop class will teach the fundamentals of digital video production and cinematic storytelling. Students will learn concepts, techniques, and technologies pertaining to digital video and sound through hands-on production and post-production assignments. We will explore the aesthetics and the communicative potential of the medium through screenings, critiques, and exercises.

CRN: 13737
Instructor: Bordogna, Heidi
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASAM, DTEM


FITV 2501 R11 - History Of Film, 1895-1950
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Rose Hill: TWTh, 01:00PM - 05:00PM

A survey of film history from 1890 to 1950, looking at industrial practices and stylistic developments. The contribution of major national cinemas is also explored. Lab fee.

Canceled
Instructor: Prettyman, Michele
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASAM


FITV 3571 R21 - Science Fiction In Film and TV
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Rose Hill, Hybrid: T, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Sociological, cultural, and psychoanalytic analysis and criticism of the science fiction genre in cinema, television, radio, print and other media. Lab fee.

CRN: 13810
Instructor: Strate, Lance
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASAM, DTEM


FITV 4570 L21 - Films Of Moral Struggle
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

CRN: 13811
Instructor: Foley, Ashar
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASAM, ASRP, BEHR, BEVL, CELP, COLI, EP4, PJMJ, PJST, REST, VAL


JOUR 2789 R21 - Sports Broadcasting
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

This class will provide a detailed study in all aspects of the sports broadcasting industry. Students will be introduced to a wide array of techniques and philosophies for sports broadcasting, from fundamentals and essentials to advanced learning methods. The course will consist of discussions, critiques, learning exercises, take home assignments and hands-on practice and participation. The course assumes no prior experience in sports broadcasting.

CRN: 13812
Instructor: Ciafardini, Robert
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: JWRI


JOUR 4712 R11 - Advanced Newsroom Experience
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

This course continues the work of the Multimedia Newsroom Experience course to give students additional practical work experience in the WFUV newsroom. WFUV is the National Public Radio affiliate station based on Fordham’s Rose Hill campus. Students in this course will be required to attend a weekly 2.5-hour class meeting each week and will also spend approximately 8 hours per week training and working in the WFUV newsroom. This hands-on journalism experience forms the core of the course. This class will provide undergraduates with experience working in a professional workplace. It will provide them with an opportunity to work collaboratively and communicate ideas, in addition to how to research and report on deadline.

Canceled
Instructor: Bodarky, George
4 credits


NMDD 3880 L21 - Designing Smart Cities For Social Justice
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: TWTh, 01:00PM - 05:00PM

This class combines a critical introduction to the promises and perils of the smart city with a community-engaged learning and design project. "Smart Urbanism" represents the rapid integration of networked technologies into all modes of urban living as well as the reorienting of urban economies toward high-tech industries. While much of smart urban rhetoric focuses on designing efficient and globally competitive cities through data-driven platforms, critics argue it has led to stepped-up surveillance, discrimination, segregation, and economic inequality in urban environments. Through class readings, group discussions, and engagement with the Lincoln Square community, students consider how a smart urban design oriented towards social justice could help rework flows of wealth, power, and privilege in New York City.

CRN: 13888
Instructor: Donovan, Gregory
4 credits


VART 1124 L21 - Photography I
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

Instruction is offered in basic camera and darkroom techniques of black-and-white photography. Class will also include critiques of students' work and discussions of aesthetic questions pertaining to photography. Students should have adjustable cameras. Additional darkroom hours required.

Canceled
Instructor: Lawton III, Joseph
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: COMM, VAPH, ZLB5


VART 1135 R11 - Visual Thinking
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Rose Hill: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

A foundation course in visual communication. The course will cover the following topics: visual perception, composition, light and color, drawing perspective, words and images, graphic design, and photography and photo montage.

CRN: 13999
Instructor: Stracquadanio, Vincent
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: COMM, FACC, FASH, FRFA, NMAT, NMDD, ZLB3


VART 1135 V21 - Visual Thinking
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Online: TWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

A foundation course in visual communication. The course will cover the following topics: visual perception, composition, light and color, drawing perspective, words and images, graphic design, and photography and photo montage.

CRN: 13943
Instructor: Wamsley, Lesley
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: COMM, FACC, FASH, FRFA, NMAT, NMDD, ZLB3


VART 1265 L11 - Film/Video I
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

An introduction to film/video production techniques used to make short projects. Students will study composition, lighting, and editing in creating their own Super 8 mm film and digital video work.

CRN: 14002
Instructor: McLaren, Ross
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: COMM, FIPR, FITV, NMAT, NMDD, VAFV, ZLB5


VART 2003 L11 - Graphic Design and Digital Tools
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 09:00AM - 01:00PM

In this course the student will learn the basic tools and operations of several different graphics programs. Photoshop, Illustrator, and QuarkXpress will be explained through demonstrations, tutorials, and weekly assignments. The focus will be on a conceptual and analytical approach to design vocabulary and problem solving.

CRN: 14001
Instructor: Green, Jessica
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: AMST, ASAM, COMM, NMAC, NMAT, NMDD, NMMI, VAGD, ZLB3


PMMA 5001 L11 - Public Interest Media Theory and Practice
Graduate Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Lincoln Center: TTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. Serving as a core introductory course for the Public Media MA program, this class examines central topics in the study and practice of media in the public interest. Students consider what is the role of media and communication in promoting (or constraining) positive social change, and what unique roles do journalists and strategic communication professionals play throughout this process? What do we mean, exactly, by concepts such as public media, the public interest, social justice, and civic engagement? How do historical and contemporary power dynamics, information technologies, and economic structures shape the types of stories that dominate the public sphere, and how do resistant voices find ways to disrupt those narratives over time? Course readings and multimedia materials are drawn from a wide variety of academic disciplines and professional sectors, while course assignments ask students to grapple with real-world topics, aiming to not only analyze social problems but also identify potential solutions.

CRN: 14029
Instructor: Broad, Garrett
3 credits


PMMA 5101 V21 - Freedom Of Expression
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2022
Online: TTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Graduate course. This course examines the history and theory of freedom of expression in the United States. We will trace the philosophical and political origins of free speech, examining key assumptions about human nature, individual liberty, and the role of government in a Democracy underlying the First Amendment. The Constitutional Framers gave us an incredible gift of freedom. But with that freedom comes responsibility. This class explores that tension. When, if ever, should expression be regulated in a Democratic society? When should the rights of the individual be curtailed to protect the group? Should all forms of media have the same degree of freedom? What special challenges are posed by the development of new communication technologies? Are there any types of speech that should be restricted? If so, which ones, and who should decide? Are there certain circumstances when free speech should be curtailed in order to support other interests, such as diversity, equality or respect for differences in religious beliefs? Should limits on speech be allowed in the name of national security? Should certain forms of expression be prohibited during wartime? What kind of restrictions can be placed on public protests? Should propaganda be legal? An investigation of our nation’s history – and the major Supreme Court cases dealing with freedom of expression – suggests that despite often lofty rhetoric about liberty. Americans actually have a great deal of ambivalence about free speech. By studying the application of First Amendment theory to various situations, such as flag burning, hate speech, restrictions on public protests, leaks of classified material and dissent during wartime, we will explore just how much freedom we actually have, and how much we really want to have.

CRN: 14040
Instructor: Levinson, Paul
3 credits

Classes listed as either Lincoln Center or Rose Hill will meet on-campus only. Classes listed as "Online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during their scheduled meeting times. Students in different time zones should plan accordingly. Session III online courses are asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus at the times indicated; additional online work will also be required.