Women Gender and Sexuality Summer Courses

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WGSS 3002 PW1 - Feminist and Women's Studies
Summer Session III, May 31 - August 4, 2022
Online: TTh, 05:30PM - 06:00PM

This course provides a historical perspective on feminism and women’s experience, including 19th and 20th century American movements for women’s rights as well as texts that influenced the development of feminist thought and theory.

CRN: 14019
Instructor: Farland, Maria
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ADVD, AMST, ASHS, ENRJ, PJGS, PJST


COMC 2277 V11 - Media and Sexuality
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: TWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

By all accounts, we have witnessed an explosion of LGBTQ representation in the media over the last decade. This course critically examines the terms of this new visibility, and inquires into the exclusions that accompany the recognition of certain queer and trans subjects. Through the study of media, film and popular culture, we will explore how representations of sex and sexuality are also central to the construction of ideas about race, class, gender, and nation.

Closed
Instructor: Moorman, Jennifer
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: CCUS, EP3, WGSS


COMC 3247 L11 - Race, Class, and Gender In Media
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MTWTh, 01:00PM - 04:00PM

This class analyzes representations of social class, racial and ethnic identity, and gender and sexuality in media. We begin our work with two assumptions. First, that media both shape and are shaped by social conceptions. Second, that these categories—race, class, and gender—are embodied, that is, they describe different physical bodies that inhabit real, lived environments. From there, students learn to identify central themes and problems in representing differences of race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality in fiction and nonfiction media. The class will use a mixture of hands-on activities with contemporary media (such as blogging, journaling, and online discussion) plus more traditional readings about theories of representation and embodiment. The course is intended as a learning environment where students are able to do more than simply identify stereotypes. Rather, they intervene in these representations, actively critiquing stereotypes and moving past them towards a reflective attitude about the relationship between society as it is lived for people of different racial, sexual, and class groups—and the image of those groups as depicted in media.

CRN: 13734
Instructor: Schwartz, Margaret
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AFAM, AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASSC, CCUS, CMST, COLI, DISA, HCWL, HUST, LALS, LASS, PJMJ, PJST, PLUR, WGSS


PHIL 4407 V11 - Gender, Power, and Justice
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: TTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

The seminar examines the impact of gender norms, roles and assumptions on the moral structure of social life. The seminar will draw on the extensive materials available from feminist theory of ethics, law, and society; the developing body of work on the cultural construction of masculinity, and its moral and social impacts; and new interest in gender differences and women's welfare in global context. The subject cannot fail to be fundamental to student's personal experiences of social and political life. especially as they make the transition from college years to the workplace or to professional training.

CRN: 13903
Instructor: Daugs, Gwen
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ADVD, AMST, APPI, ASHS, EP4, VAL, WGSS


PHIL 4407 V21 - Gender, Power, and Justice
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Online: MW, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

The seminar examines the impact of gender norms, roles and assumptions on the moral structure of social life. The seminar will draw on the extensive materials available from feminist theory of ethics, law, and society; the developing body of work on the cultural construction of masculinity, and its moral and social impacts; and new interest in gender differences and women's welfare in global context. The subject cannot fail to be fundamental to student's personal experiences of social and political life. especially as they make the transition from college years to the workplace or to professional training.

CRN: 13904
Instructor: Whitney, Shiloh
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ADVD, AMST, APPI, ASHS, EP4, VAL, WGSS


PSYC 3600 L21 - Multicultural Psychology
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 09:00AM - 12:00PM

The focus of this course is the multicultural applicability of scientific and professional psychology. Traditional psychological theories, scientific psychology, psychological tests, and the practice of psychology will be examined and critiqued from cultural and socio-historical perspectives. Contemporary psychological theories and research specific to men, women, gay men, lesbians, and race/ethnicity will be reviewed.

CRN: 14053
Instructor: Jimenez-Salazar, Maria
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ADVD, AMST, ASHS, ASSC, BESN, BIOE, LALS, LASS, PJRC, PJST, PLUR, PSDV, PYAC, URST, WGSS


SOCI 2847 V11 - The 60s: Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll
Summer Session I, May 31 - June 30, 2022
Online: MTWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

The 1960's was one of the most tumultuous eras in American history, marked by a revolutionary movement led by youth struggling for freedom on many levels. African Americans, with white support, struggled against the oppression of racial segregation of the South in the Civil Rights movement: young people sought sexual freedom and the right to experiment with drugs; musicians broke away from the restraints of traditional pop and folk songs and created rock and roll; politically minded youth attacked the traditional institutions of political and economic power by protesting against the war in Vietnam; women challenged traditional male attitudes that confined them to domesticity or inferior status in the work place and in society; gays organized against the repressive laws and prejudices against homosexuality. This course will show how all of these social strands intertwined using films, music and writings from the era.

CRN: 13988
Instructor: Wormser, Richard
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: ACUP, AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASHS, ASSC, WGSS


SOCI 2925 V21 - Media Crime Sex Violence
Summer Session II, July 5 - August 4, 2022
Online: MTWTh, 06:00PM - 09:00PM

Turn on the television set, pick up the local newspaper, go on the Internet or watch a movie. Wherever you turn, you will find the media saturated with stories about corrupt cops and honest cops, drug dealers and drug users, murderers and victims, organized crime and serial killers, crusading district attorneys and defense attorneys, corrupt lawyers and hanging judges, violent prisoners and convicted innocents. How accurate are these representations? What are the ideological messages and cultural values these stories communicate? In this course, you will learn how to demystify media representations in order to understand how and why they are produced, and who is responsible for their production.

CRN: 13934
Instructor: Wormser, Richard
4 credits

Fordham course attributes: AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASHS, ASSC, PJMJ, PJST, URST, WGSS


THEO 3715 PW1 - Classic Islamic Texts
Summer Session III, May 31 - August 4, 2022
Online, Asynchronous

This course explores classical, medieval, modern, and contemporary texts of Islam, including the Quran, Hadith, and philosophical, historical, mystical, ritual, and legal texts.

Closed
Instructor: Kueny, Kathryn
3 credits

Fordham course attributes: GLBL, HHPA, HUST, INST, ISAS, ISIN, ISME, MEST, MVST, MVTH, REST, STSN, STXT, THHC, WGSS

Classes listed as either Lincoln Center or Rose Hill will meet on-campus only. Classes listed as "Online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during their scheduled meeting times. Students in different time zones should plan accordingly. Session III online courses are asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus at the times indicated; additional online work will also be required.