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English Summer Courses

ENGL 1101 R21 - Composition I
Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This first-year course provides instruction in how to generate and present a critical position in the college essay, with emphasis on the development of unity, coherence, and clarity of expression in written communication. We will also review basic grammar with emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems.

CRN: 10128
Instructor: Smigen-Rothkopf
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L11 - Composition II
Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 10130
Instructor: Rome
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R11 - Composition II
Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2019
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 10133
Instructor: McEleney
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L21 - Composition II
Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 10132
Instructor: Cargile
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R21 - Composition II
Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 10136
Instructor: Breedlove
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R22 - Composition II
Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 10143
Instructor: Sottosanti
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L11 - Texts and Contexts: Avengers and Revengers
Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

CRN: 10150
Instructor: Lillo
3 credits


ENGL 2000 R11 - Texts and Contexts: Magic, Mystery, and Murder
Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2019
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

How do you solve the perfect crime? Or commit one? This course pursues criminals from early modern times to the present and tracks the evolution of transgressive behavior. We will examine everything from accounts of dark magic to cold-blooded murder to see how individuals violate social norms. We will also think about the questions, How do other react to unexpected moves? How are acts of criminality explained or neutralized? Where have people drawn the line between acceptable and unacceptable transgressions? How do past attitudes towards crime relate to present-day ones?

CRN: 10152
Instructor: Tajbhai
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L21 - Texts and Contexts: The Phenomenon of Oprah's Book Club
Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: (hybrid), 6 - 9 p.m.

Since it's inception in September 1996, Oprah's Book Club (OBC) has transformed the literary landscape -- from ushering in a new wave of enthusiastic readers and spiking the sale of books around the globe to reshaping the advertising and marketing of literature and offering readers strategies for engaging it. This course will explore the phenomenon of OBC, thinking through its formation and rise as wlel as its strategies and approaches to literature. We will tackle these matters as we discuss seconary sources that map out various parts of OBC's trajectory and as we examine closely themes of racial beauty. sexual assault, racism, immigration, slavery, and imprisonment in OBC-selected texts.

CRN: 10148
Instructor: Tyler
3 credits


ENGL 2000 PW1 - Texts and Contexts: Contemporary Satire and Social Change
Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2019
Online

From the writings of the ancient Greeks to television shows like South Park, satire has been used to point out problems in society. This course will track the progress and effects of satire from its "heydey" in the Eighteenth century to today. How has satire evolved? How can satire be used to elicit real lasting change? How does satire navigate through systems set in place to monitor and restrict free speech. These are some of the questions we will be considering throughout the course.

CRN: 10151
Instructor: Papp
3 credits


ENGL 3650 PW1 - Stayin' Alive: Performing Race and Ethnicity in 1970's US Film and Literature
Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2019
Online:

Using film - Hollywood and Independent - as the primary texts, this course will introduce students to many of the debates surrounding the political and social climate of the U.S. in the 1970s marked by the increasing influence of identity politics., The Ethnic Revival, and black power. Using texts ranging from Shaft and The Godfather to Saturday Night Fever and Serpico, this interdisciplinary class will use film, media, and performance studies to consider the ways in which intersecting modes of identity develop and change across U.S. historical eras, particularly through the dissemination of media images. Ancillary reading will draw from autobiographies, journalism, history, and popular criticism.

CRN: 10156
Instructor: Poulson-Bryant
4 credits


ENGL 3851 R11 - Horror and Madness in Fiction and Film
Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2019
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

How and why do we respond to horror, madness, and rage in film and literature? What are our reactions and responsibilities? Starting with the Alien series, the course moves to work by Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Toni Morrison, Virginia Woolf, Sigmund Freud, and Emmanuel Levinas, among others.

CRN: 10160
Instructor: Gold
4 credits


ENGL 4150 L21 - Race and Hollywood Film
Session II, July 2 - August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This course examines how contemporary U.S. culture represents its racial others. Drawing on theories and methods from sociology, political science, philosophy, and literary theory, we will develop a provisional model of interdisciplinary cultural analysis that will enable us to examine how racial representations work, why they matter, and how they can be most fruitfully interpreted. We will then conduct a series of case studies in racial representation. Each case will be organized around a recent Hollywood film, and each film will be examined from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, with particular emphasis on how the various disciplines both illuminate and obscure various aspects of the racial representation at hand. Fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 10162
Instructor: Kim
4 credits


ENGL 4403 PW1 - Extraordinary Bodies
Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2019
Online

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with non-normative bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bodies from a variety of personal and social perspectives.

CRN: 10163
Instructor: Sanchez
4 credits


ENGL 4403 PW2 - Extraordinary Bodies
Session III, May 28 - August 6, 2019
Online

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with non-normative bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bodies from a variety of personal and social perspectives.

CRN: 10165
Instructor: Sanchez
4 credits


ENGL 5020 L11 - "Fear on the Homefront": The literature of peace and war
Session I, May 28 - June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: MW, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. The decision to wage war is one of the most consequential choices we make. The struggle to achieve and maintain peace is one of the most challenging and abstract human goals. For all the ways that war and peace are tied up with politics, we can come to a better understanding of our human experience of peace and war through art. This seminar explores literary and cinematic representations of peace and war from Classical times to the present day. We look at war stories and the special case of civil war, as well as the more recent phenomenon of fear on the homefront. We end with a unit on pacifism and peace work. We will read nonfiction sources highlighting ethical and more ideas about war (by Abraham Lincoln, Simone Weil, Jean Methke Elshain, Michael Walzer and others). Authors include Homer, Shakespeare, Virginia Woolf, Vera Brittain, and many others. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

CRN:
Instructor: Fernald
3 credits