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English Summer Courses

Classes listed as "online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during a portion of their scheduled meeting times with additional coursework to be completed asynchronously. Session III online courses are all asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus; however, the university will continue to implement the Flexible Hybrid Learning Environment to keep the community safe and allow for the possibility of remote attendance as necessary.


Fordham students please check courses in my.fordham.edu for the most accurate Attribute listings.

ENGL 1101 R11 - Composition I
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Instruction in sentence and paragraph construction, reading comprehension skills and analysis, the basic principles of grammar with an emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems, and principles of argumentation and evidence. Weekly assignments and regular grammar exercises to build confidence and competence in college writing.

CRN: 12454
Instructor: Artan
3 credits


ENGL 1101 R21 - Composition I
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Instruction in sentence and paragraph construction, reading comprehension skills and analysis, the basic principles of grammar with an emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems, and principles of argumentation and evidence. Weekly assignments and regular grammar exercises to build confidence and competence in college writing.

CRN: 12611
Instructor: O'Brien
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L12 - Composition II
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

CRN: 12650
Instructor: Wolf
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R12 - Composition II
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

CRN: 12456
Instructor: McEleney
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L21 - Composition II
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

Closed
Instructor: Anderson
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L22 - Composition II
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

CRN: 12795
Instructor: Cawley
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R22 - Composition II
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

CRN: 12614
Instructor: Finn-Atkins
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R23 - Composition II
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

Closed
Instructor: TBA
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L11 - Texts and Contexts: The American Renaissance Remixed
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course will introduce students to the body of literature known as the American Renaissance and explore the centrality of the themes of democracy, citizenship, and freedom to nineteenth-century literature. We will also look at how the American Renaissance remains relevant today: as we’ll see, contemporary writers and filmmakers have continued to “remix” and rewrite the works of that period to interrogate American ideals and address present-day social and political issues. Writers we will study include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Jordan Peele, and Claudia Rankine. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: D'Onofrio
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L12 - Texts and Contexts: "To Tell The Truth": The Unreliable Narrator
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

When you think about it, we have very little direct experience of the world we live in. Most of it is mediated, coming to us on one platform or another—TV or Twitter, The New York Times or Instagram. Nevertheless, every day, we have to make judgments and decisions about what to do, how to vote, what movie to see, based on the credibility of whomever delivers our information. We do this in a variety of ways, but we probably can't list our strategies because we mostly act intuitively and quickly. The goal of this course is to pay attention to the messenger. We will focus on how to "read" various print, image, and cinematic texts critically—journalistic as well as literary--in order to become aware of the credibility of the messengers and think about how to tell a reliable one from an unreliable one. In doing so, we will analyze how we move toward trusting or mistrusting the narrator in a text, as well as why we do or don't come to trust that narrator’s point of view. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Stone
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L13 - Texts and Contexts: After The Apocalypse
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 7-10 p.m.

What happens after the end of the world, and how is this affected by how the world ends? This course will survey post-apocalyptic works of literature and film to think about how they depict societies, places, and human/non-human worlds, as well as how representations of apocalyptic worlds shift in response to changing social conditions. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Quinsland
3 credits


CLAS 2000 R11 - Texts and Contexts: Myth in Greco-Roman Literature
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online, TTh, 1-4 p.m.

An introduction to the literary analysis of texts and the cultural and historical contexts within which they are produced and read. Significant class time will be devoted to critical writing and to speaking about literature. Each section of Texts and Contexts will have a focus developed by the individual instructor and expressed in its subtitle. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Burns
3 credits


ENGL 2000 R12 - Texts and Contexts: Melancholy, Folly, and Frenzy
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course will explore how authors have used melancholy, folly, and frenzy as tools of social criticism and as explanations for creativity. Although some authors have tended to pathologize these states of being, there are contrasting perspectives from literature, religion, philosophy, and medicine. Our reading will be both context-specific and comparative; we will seek to understand each account in the context in which it was written and contrast each account with other accounts. Instead of agreement, we will find debate and disagreement in every period about how melancholy, folly, and frenzy should be treated and defined. Authors will include Plato, Shakespeare, Milton, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ralph Ellison, and Sylvia Plath. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Furry
3 credits


ENGL 2000 R13 - Texts and Contexts: Latin American Literatures
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

In this course we will cover a wide range of Latin American literatures, ranging from pre-Columbian indigenous stories to contemporary fiction. Across multiple time periods and regions, we will explore the transnational and complex Latin American literary world. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Pratt
3 credits


ENGL 2000 PW1 - Texts And Contexts: The Fashion System
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

In this course, we will examine the modern (and post-modern) phenomenon of fashion through the lens of literature. We’ll read novels and short stories that are obsessed with fashion, and cultural theory that tries to figure it out: its cult codes and systems of meaning, its artistic and aesthetic visions, its fetishistic power, its role in economics, politics, and social organization, and its subversive potential. Topics of study will include modernity and urbanism, capitalism and consumerism, colonialism, race and racialization, subculture, and gender and sexuality. As a ‘Texts and Contexts’ course, ‘The Fashion System’ will also focus on critical reading and writing, as students learn to think comparatively about works of literature. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Enelow
3 credits


ENGL 2000 PW2 - Texts and Contexts: Contemporary Satire and Social Change
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

This course on modern satire will focus on issues of genre and subject matter. By considering print, television, film, and music, we will look at the ways in which satire has developed as a barometer of social discontent. We will also consider how effective satire has been at eliciting real and lasting change and what the future trajectory of satire might be. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Papp
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L21 - Texts and Contexts: Native American Literatures
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course surveys Native American literatures from the nineteenth century to the present day. What are the main themes and issues of concern in Native American writing? How do these authors re-imagine indigenous and non-indigenous languages and genres as forms of resistance, survival, or reconciliation? How do we read Native American literatures while respecting some Native American authors’ desires to protect their knowledge? We will address these and other questions by reading a wide variety of authors, including William Apess, Jane Johnston-Schoolcraft, Leslie Marmon Silko, Daniel Heath Justice, and Robin Wall Kimmerer. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Marks-Watton
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L22 - Texts and Contexts: Queer Literature Of The 20th and 21st Centuries
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course focuses on poetry, fiction, memoir, and zines written by queer/trans authors, focusing primarily on work published during and after the civil rights movement, up to the contemporary moment. We will be reading works by writers such as Gloria Anzaldúa, Audre Lorde, and Eli Clare, among others. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Castellanos
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L23 - Texts and Contexts: Reading The Forever Wars
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

In this course, we will read and discuss literature, journalism, and film that depicts the United States' near constant state of being "at war." With an emphasis on material published since 2001, we will ask questions of historical context, genre, and style in order to better understand the military/civilian divide, the experience of veterans, and the role of artists in capturing conflict. Specifically, we will ask questions of canon, prestige, and bias when we examine Phil Klay's National Book Award-winning Redeployment. We will seek a plurality of viewpoints by reading the work of an anonymous Iraqi woman in her twenties who "live-blogged" the American invasion and occupation of Baghdad. And we will engage with multiple modes of expression by considering Dexter Filkin's embedded reporting from Iraq, Lynsey Addario's photographs from war-torn Afghanistan, Brian Turner's poems from the perspective of a drone over multiple warzones, and Clint Eastwood's American Sniper, the highest-grossing war film of all time. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Krause
3 credits


ENGL 2000 R21 - Texts and Contexts: Gender and Sexuality In Postcolonial Literature
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TTh, 7-10 a.m.

This course examines works across a range of genres that contend with the ongoing formations and afterlives of colonialism, empire and slavery. Highlighting feminist and queer frameworks in particular, we will focus on the intersection of gender formation, sexuality, race, and indigeneity. Throughout, the class considers the centrality of gender and sexual violence to systems of racial control and reflects upon the relationship between intimate, structural and state violence. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Detournay
3 credits


ENGL 2000 R22 - Texts and Contexts: Werewolves In Literature and Beyond
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Stories of shapeshifters and werewolves go back centuries. In this course, we’ll read werewolf literature spanning centuries and from across the globe, from ancient Rome and medieval England to Africa, Japan, the Navajo Nation, and the contemporary United States, and we’ll examine their place within various literary canons and genres, including folklore, film, comics, novels, and poetry. The course will explore the ways that werewolves reveal cultural narratives about animality, gender, transformation, and violence, and we will think about why werewolves have occupied people’s terrors and imaginations for so long. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Light
3 credits


IDIS 3080 L31 - Winners and Losers In Fiction and Film (PCS only)
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online: Saturday, Sunday: June 19, 20 and July 24, 25

Literature and film are filled with so-called “winners” and so-called “losers.”  Who can claim these titles and why?  Who decides and how?  In analyzing these topics, we’ll explore what can be learned about the human condition in the individual and in society.  Works discussed will include, Snow White; Goldilocks and the Three Bears; Death of a Salesman; Charlie Chaplin’s Little Tramp; Glengarry Glen Ross; My Left Foot, and others.

CRN: 12855
Instructor: Bach
4 credits


ENGL 3467 R11 - Disobedience In Literature
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

"Of man's first disobedience" -- so begins John Milton's epic poem, PARADISE LOST. Milton was not alone in having his interest sparked: the concept of disobedience in its various permutations (literary, social, political, psychological, religious) has energized a wide variety of literary works. One might say that without some form of disobedience, there could be no storytelling. Some of the questions that will shape our explorations in this course include: when is disobedience heroic, and when is it destructive or regrettable? What is the difference between disobeying your family and disobeying the law? Can an obedient character be interesting? How are the different modes of authority (religious, juridical, familial) played off against one another in order to license behavior? Using disobedience as our guiding rubric, we will follow important continuities and innovative changes in literary history across the past three centuries. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Collins
4 credits


ENGL 3645 R11 - The Middle Passage
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

In the United States, slavery and daring attempts to escape it have become the subject of such popular works as "12 Years a Slave," "Underground," and "Harriet." We have heard less, however, about the “middle passage,” one of the most difficult parts of the slave trade to represent. The middle passage refers to the involuntary migration of enslaved people across the Atlantic Ocean and, specifically, the weeks and months they spent aboard ships as they crossed from Africa to the Americas. In this course, we will read works that depict the middle passage and grapple with its history. How have writers represented this catastrophe, even as they faced the impossibility of truly representing its horrors? How can studying the middle passage provide us with insights into slavery, as well as other, more contemporary forced migrations? What’s at stake in studying the middle passage today? We will see that in spite of the aesthetic problems it poses, the middle passage has inspired a wide range of Black writers, theorists, and artists to produce both histories of oppression and visions of freedom, as well as portraits of everyone from the overthrown and dispossessed to the riotous and resilient. Possible texts might include: Toni Morrison’s "Beloved," Julie Dash’s "Daughters of the Dust," Paul Gilroy’s "The Black Atlantic," Zora Neale Hurston’s "Barracoon," and M. NourbeSe Philip’s "Zong!," among others. 

CRN: 12656
Instructor: Panaram
4 credits


ENGL 3663 R21 - Graphic Novels Through The Ages
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Although many people think of "graphic novel" as merely a fancy synonym for "comic book," the format predates Superman by centuries. In this course, we’ll trace the graphic novel across a variety of genres and periods, including the medieval bestiary, the early modern pastoral, modern satire, and, of course, contemporary comics.

CRN: 12704
Instructor: Sottosanti
4 credits


ENGL 3835 R11 - Aliens and Encounters With The Unknown
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

The foreign, the strange, the unfamiliar: our stories are filled with encounters between the known and unknown, whether they describe travelers visiting foreign lands or science-fiction journeys among the stars. This course will focus on moments of first contact, exploring what makes someone an insider or an outsider and investigating what happens when this border is troubled. Focusing on the multifaceted figure of the alien in novellas, films, and graphic novels, we will begin with historical accounts, including European descriptions of conquest and colonization. Turning to science fiction, we will consider alien invaders as expressions of Cold War anxieties, as well as the film Alien and transgressions of bodily boundaries. We will conclude with a consideration of immigration, paying particular attention to Shuan Tan's graphic novel The Arrival.

CRN: 12462
Instructor: Pinnix
4 credits


ENGL 4096 PW1 - Hobbits/Heroes/Hubris
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

Centering on Tolkien’s The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, this course will examine heroes and heroines, with all their cultural, philosophical, and individual limitations. We will take a close look in particular at epic journeys in order to tease out the ever-changing definition of heroism. What are the boundaries of heroic figures’ ethics and morality, and what happens when they get crossed? How do heroes and heroines walk the fine line between self-confidence and hubris? Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Tajbhai
4 credits


ENGL 4150 L21 - Race and Contemporary Film
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course examines contemporary cinema in an effort to understand the racial present. Drawing on theories and methods from sociology, anthropology, history, and literary theory, we will develop a provisional model of interdisciplinary cultural analysis that will help us better understand how representations of race function in our own historical moment. At the same time, we will investigate exactly what constitutes “our own historical moment.” What is the historical present? How and why does it differ from one racial group to the next? And how do these competing racial temporalities affect present-day racial politics? With such questions in mind, we will conduct a series of case studies in racial representation. Each case will be organized around a recent film, and each film will be examined from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, with particular emphasis on how various academic disciplines both illuminate and obscure various aspects of the racial representation at hand. Fulfills the ICC and Pluralism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Kim
4 credits


ENGL 4228 L11 - Black Protest, Black Resistance, Black Freedom, Black Rage (Short Title: Black Protest)
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course will consider the canon of African American literature through an expansive definition of protest. We will examine how the meaning of protest has evolved from the eighteenth century to the present. As we interrogate the relationship between blackness and protest, we will also discuss how that history has consistently shaped American identity. Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Tyler
4 credits


ENGL 4403 PW1 - Extraordinary Bodies
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bodies from a variety of personal and social perspectives. Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Sanchez
4 credits