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English Summer Courses

ENGL 1101 R21 Composition I
Session II, July 5 - August 6, 2018
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m. *Please note that this course will also meet for one make-up class on Friday, July 6 and for the final exam on Monday, August 6.*

This first-year course provides instruction in how to generate and present a critical position in the college essay, with emphasis on the development of unity, coherence, and clarity of expression in written communication. We will also review basic grammar with emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems. ENGL 1101 R21 syllabus.

CRN: Closed
Instructor: Hopwood
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L21 Composition II
Session II, July 5 - August 6, 2018
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. *Please note that this course will also meet for one make-up class on Friday, July 6 and for the final exam on Monday, August 6.*

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis. ENGL 1102 L21 syllabus

CRN: 10231
Instructor: Pratt
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R21 Composition II
Session II, July 5 - August 6, 2018
Rose Hill: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m. *Please note that this course will also meet for one make-up class on Friday, July 6 and for the final exam on Monday, August 6.*

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 10232
Instructor: Cawley
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L11 Composition II
Session I, May 29 - June 28, 2018
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis. ENGL 1102 L11 syllabus.

CRN: Closed
Instructor: Northrop
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R11 Composition II
Session I, May 29 - June 28, 2018
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis. ENGL 1102 R11 syllabus.

CRN: 10061
Instructor: Byers
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R22 Composition II
Session II, July 5 - August 6, 2018
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m. *Please note that this course will also meet for one make-up class on Friday, July 6 and for the final exam on Monday, August 6.*

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis. ENGL 1102 R22 syllabus.

CRN: 10233
Instructor: Light
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L11 Texts and Contexts: Running in Literature
Session I, May 29 - June 28, 2018
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

From classical antiquity to contemporary times, the sport of running has raised important questions about the body, athletic identity, ceremony, and isolation. Through close and comparative readings, this course analyzes how running appears in various historical contexts and literary genres-including poetry, novels, short stories, training guides, and memoirs. Authors include Homer, Ovid, Browning, Sillito, Nell Warren, Murakami, and Quatro. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Fulfills the EP 2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. ENGL 2000 L11 syllabus.

CRN: Closed
Instructor: Finn-Atkins
3 credits


ENGL 2000 R11 Texts and Contexts: Witches and Britches
Session I, May 29 - June 28, 2018
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This course looks at the "bad women" of early modern literature: the magical, the defiant, and the co-opters of masculine roles. How do they shatter norms, how are they handled, and how do they apply to us today? Fulfills the EP 2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. ENGL 2000 R11 Syllabus

CRN: 10063
Instructor: Tajbhai
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L21 Texts and Contexts: Literature and Leadership
Session II, July 5 - August 6, 2018
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m. *Please note that this course will also meet for one make-up class on Friday, July 6 and for the final exam on Monday, August 6.*

In this course we will consider what we can about leadership from literature. We will read authors ranging from Sophocles to Stephen Colbert. Fulfills the EP 2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. ENGL 2000 L21 syllabus.

CRN: Closed
Instructor: VanWyck
3 credits


CLAS 2000 R21 Texts and Contexts: Myth in Greco-Roman Literature
Session II, July 5 - August 6, 2018
Rose Hill: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m. *Please note that this course will also meet for one make-up class on Friday, July 6 and for the final exam on Monday, August 6.*

A survey of ancient myths from Greece and Rome via the literary works of Homer, Hesiod, Vergil, and Ovid. Major themes: creation, the hero, the journey, gods, and monsters. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 10220
Instructor: Schewel
3 credits


ENGL 2000 PW1 Texts and Contexts: Contemporary Satire and Social Change
Session III, May 29 - August 6, 2018
Online

This course on modern satire will focus on genre and subject-matter. By considering print, television, film, and music, we will spend the semester looking at the ways in which satire has developed as a barometer of social discontent. We will consider how effective satire has been at eliciting real and lasting change, and imagine the future trajectory of satire. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. ENGL 2000 PW1 syllabus.

CRN: Closed
Instructor: Papp
3 credits


ENGL 3114 R21 The (Medieval) Walking Dead
Session II, July 5 - August 6, 2018
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Ranging from stories of undead armies in "Branwen, Daughter of Llyr" to eternally-damned 'zombie' knights in Perlesvaus, and from genres varying from chronicle to romance, this course explores the cultural significance of medieval 'zombies,' revenants, spirits, and other beings that we would classify as 'undead' in order to understand how such monsters might relate to medieval concerns about living, death, dying, and the afterlife. How do the living relate to the dead in the Middle Ages? What happens to bodies and souls after death? How do concerns about morality and living affect the person in the afterlife? Fulfills the Advanced Literature requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. ENGL 3114 R21 Syllabus

CRN: Cancelled
Instructor:
4 credits


ENGL 4150 L11 Race and Hollywood Film
Session I, May 29 - June 28, 2018
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This interdisciplinary capstone course examines how contemporary U.S. culture represents its racial others. Drawing on theories and methods from sociology, political science, philosophy, and literary theory, we will develop a provisional model of interdisciplinary cultural analysis that will enable us to examine how racial representations work, why they matter, and how they can be most fruitfully interpreted. We will then conduct a series of case studies in racial representation. Each case will be organized around a recent Hollywood film, and each film will be examined from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, with particular emphasis on how the various disciplines both illuminate and obscure various aspects of the racial representation at hand. The course will culminate in a series of group presentations, with each group presenting an interdisciplinary analysis of a recent racial representation of its own choosing. Fulfills the Pluralism and Interdisciplinary Capstone requirements in Fordham's core curriculum. ENGL 4150 L11 syllabus.

CRN: 10064
Instructor: Kim
4 credits


ENGL 4403 PW1 Extraordinary Bodies
Session III, May 29 - August 6, 2018
Online

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with non-normative bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bodies from a variety of personal and social perspectives. Fulfills the Senior Values/EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: Closed
Instructor: Sanchez
4 credits


ENGL 5311 R21 Modern Irish Literature
Session II, July 5 - August 7, 2018
Rose Hill: TTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. This course aims to strike a balance between two goals. On the one hand, we will attempt to deepen our understanding and catch up with recent critical developments relating to the most canonical figures in the Irish literary tradition, such as Wilde, Joyce, Beckett, and Yeats. On the other hand, we will seek to expand our understanding of the Irish canon and its range by looking beyond the texts that have been most studied in English departments to include works by women (Elizabeth Bowen, Maud Goone, Edna O'Briend, Eavan Boland), those who compose in the Irish language (Eibhlin Dhubh Ni Chonailll, Mairtin O Cadhain), writers from the North (Seamus Heaney, Medbh McGuckian), and contemporary writers (Eimear McBride, Ursula Rani Sarma). Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

CRN: 10236
Instructor: Walsh
3 credits