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Philosophy Summer Courses

Classes listed as "online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during a portion of their scheduled meeting times with additional coursework to be completed asynchronously. Session III online courses are all asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus; however, the university will continue to implement the Flexible Hybrid Learning Environment to keep the community safe and allow for the possibility of remote attendance as necessary.


Fordham students please check courses in my.fordham.edu for the most accurate Attribute listings.

PHIL 1000 L11 - Philosophy of Human Nature
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

A philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge, (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith and reason); free will and determinism; and self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity and tradition). At least 60 percent of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure. Fulfills the EP1 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 12732
Instructor: Wang
3 credits


PHIL 1000 R11 - Philosophy of Human Nature
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

A philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge, (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith and reason); free will and determinism; and self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity and tradition). At least 60 percent of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure.

CRN: 12737
Instructor: MacDougall
3 credits


PHIL 1000 R12 - Philosophy of Human Nature
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

A philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge, (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith and reason); free will and determinism; and self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity and tradition). At least 60 percent of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure. Fulfills the EP1 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.Fulfills the EP1 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Haddad
3 credits


PHIL 1000 R13 - Philosophy of Human Nature
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

A philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge, (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith and reason); free will and determinism; and self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity and tradition). At least 60 percent of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure. Fulfills the EP1 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Haddad
3 credits


PHIL 1000 PW1 - Philosophy of Human Nature
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

A philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge, (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith and reason); free will and determinism; and self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity and tradition). At least 60 percent of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Begun
3 credits


PHIL 1000 PW2 - Philosophy of Human Nature
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

A philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge, (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith and reason); free will and determinism; and self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity and tradition). At least 60 percent of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Gruber
3 credits


PHIL 1000 PW3 - Philosophy of Human Nature
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

A philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge, (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith and reason); free will and determinism; and self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity and tradition). At least 60 percent of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Schweiger
3 credits


PHIL 1000 R22 - Philosophy of Human Nature
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

A philosophical reflection on the central metaphysical and epistemological questions surrounding human nature, which includes discussion of some or all of the following problems: the body/soul distinction and the mind/body problem; the problem of knowledge, (relativism, skepticism, the objectivity of knowledge, faith and reason); free will and determinism; and self and society (subjectivity, personhood, sociality, historicity and tradition). At least 60 percent of each section of the course is devoted to readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine or Aquinas, and Descartes. Each section includes some writings by at least one contemporary figure.

CRN: 12711
Instructor: Gruber
3 credits


PHIL 3000 L11 - Philosophical Ethics
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences among these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Tokay
3 credits


PHIL 3000 L12 - Philosophical Ethics
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences among these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Shepardson
3 credits


PHIL 3000 R11 - Philosophical Ethics
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences among these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Bresee
3 credits


PHIL 3000 R13 - Philosophical Ethics
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences among these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Klima
3 credits


PHIL 3000 R14 - Philosophical Ethics
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences among these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Proust
3 credits


PHIL 3000 PW1 - Philosophical Ethics
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences amoung these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Engel
3 credits


PHIL 3000 PW2 - Philosophical Ethics
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences amoung these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Metzger
3 credits


PHIL 3000 PW3 - Philosophical Ethics
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences amoung these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Bresee
3 credits


PHIL 3000 L21 - Philosophical Ethics
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences among these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Ballantyne
3 credits


PHIL 3000 R21 - Philosophical Ethics
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences among these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Sooy
3 credits


PHIL 3000 R22 - Philosophical Ethics
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences amoung these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Proust
3 credits


PHIL 3000 R23 - Philosophical Ethics
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course involves philosophical reflection on the major normative ethical theories underlying moral decision making in our everyday lives. The principal focus of the course is a systematic introduction to the main normative ethical theories, i.e., eudaimonism, natural law ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and feminism. The differences amoung these approaches are illuminated by studying various moral issues. In each section of the course, at least half the readings will be selected from Aristotle and Kant. Each section will include writings by at least one contemporary figure.

Closed
Instructor: Proust
3 credits


PHIL 4407 R11 - Gender, Power, Justice
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

The seminar examines the impact of gender norms, roles and assumptions on the moral structure of social life. The seminar will draw on the extensive materials available from feminist theory of ethics, law, and society; the developing body of work on the cultural construction of masculinity, and its moral and social impacts; and new interest in gender differences and women's welfare in global context. The subject cannot fail to be fundamental to student's personal experiences of social and political life. especially as they make the transition from college years to the workplace or to professional training. Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 12741
Instructor: Daugs
4 credits


PHIL 4407 L21 - Gender, Power, Justice
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MW, 9 a.m.-Noon

The seminar examines the impact of gender norms, roles and assumptions on the moral structure of social life. The seminar will draw on the extensive materials available from feminist theory of ethics, law, and society; the developing body of work on the cultural construction of masculinity, and its moral and social impacts; and new interest in gender differences and women's welfare in global context. The subject cannot fail to be fundamental to student's personal experiences of social and political life. especially as they make the transition from college years to the workplace or to professional training. Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Lake
4 credits


PHIL 4416 L21 - Art, Morality, Politics
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

The seminar explores the inter-relationship among artistic, moral and political values. Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Jampol-Petzinger
4 credits


PHIL 4444 L11 - AI, Sci. Fi., and Human Values
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

 

Closed
Instructor: Walsh
4 credits


PHIL 4480 PW1 - Technology and Values
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

This senior values seminar examines the challenge that modern technology presents to our traditional ethical standpoints and, ultimately, to the very idea of an ethical culture insofar as modern technology has shifted from merely serving the culture to shaping the culture in fundamental ways regarding the measure of our humanity. Previously PHIL 3180. Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Babich
4 credits


PHIL 4484 R11 - Freedom and Responsibility
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

The course will investigate several problems concerning freedom, responsibility and the morality of punishment. Is freedom possible in a world completely governed by physical laws? How can I be blamed (or praised) for my actions, given that upbringing, character, and environment are largely matters of luck? Is the practice of punishing criminals morally justifiable? How?

Closed
Instructor: Racine
4 credits


PHIL 4484 L21 - Freedom and Responsibility
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

The course will investigate several problems concerning freedom, responsibility and the morality of punishment. Is freedom possible in a world completely governed by physical laws? How can I be blamed (or praised) for my actions, given that upbringing, character, and environment are largely matters of luck? Is the practice of punishing criminals morally justifiable? How?

Closed
Instructor: Pope
4 credits