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Sociology and Anthropology Summer Courses

Classes listed as "online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during a portion of their scheduled meeting times with additional coursework to be completed asynchronously. Session III online courses are all asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus; however, the university will continue to implement the Flexible Hybrid Learning Environment to keep the community safe and allow for the possibility of remote attendance as necessary.


Fordham students please check courses in my.fordham.edu for the most accurate Attribute listings.

ANTH 1100 L11 - Introduction To Cultural Anthropology
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and the family, adaptions to the environment and to political, economic and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures.

CRN: 12617
Instructor: Maraesa
3 credits


ANTH 1100 L21 - Introduction To Cultural Anthropology
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and the family, adaptions to the environment and to political, economic and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures.

CRN: 12539
Instructor: Gajula
3 credits


ANTH 1100 R21 - Introduction To Cultural Anthropology
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and the family, adaptions to the environment and to political, economic and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures.

CRN: 12540
Instructor: George
3 credits


ANTH 1200 L21 - Introduction To Physical Anthropology
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: M (lab),TWTh: 9 a.m.-Noon

This introduction to physical (or biological) anthropology satisfies a core life science requirement and serves as a general survey of the biological focus of anthropology. The course summarizes the different areas of physical anthropology and covers the history of evolutionary theories, human genetics and adaptation, primate biology, behavioral ecology and conservation, and an extensive overview of the human fossil record. In particular, we emphasize the variations found in non-human primates and the biological and cultural changes that took place in our ancestors over the past 6.8 million years. Lab sessions will provide a practical introduction to human osteology, primate morphology, primate conservation, and comparisons of human fossil morphology.

Closed
Instructor: Johnson
3 credits


ANTH 1500 R21 - Introduction To Fashion and Culture
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This introductory lecture course is required for students pursuing the fashion studies minor. In this class, students will be introduced to cultural and media studies concepts that will equip them with the theoretical and methodological tools necessary to explore fashion as a historically situated and context-dependent form of communication and meaning-making. The course considers the implications of fashion within systems of power, everyday acts of self-presentation, and larger politics of representation.

CRN: 12546
Instructor: Garcia
4 credits


ANTH 1600 R11 - Introduction To Human Variation
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: M (lab), TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This introductory physical anthropology course explores in detail issues of human biological variation, that is, why humans differ from each other. It satisfies a life science core requirement and examines evolutionary theories, human genetic variations, and human adaptations to environmental stresses. The main focus of investigation of human genotypic and phenotypic variations as observed in contemporary human populations to obtain an understanding of the biological basis for anatomical and physiological variation (incorrectly referred to as ‘race’ in a social context), including different evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped these variations, and how changing environments may have influenced these directions as well as the emergence of, and adjustment to, various chronic diseases. Lab sessions provide a practical introduction to cellular genetics, population genetics, osteology, anthropometry, statistics, and human evolution.

Closed
Instructor: Sutton
3 credits


ANTH 2619 L21 - Magic Science and Religion
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Magic, science and religion will be analyzed, compared and contrasted. Problems in the comparative study of these topics, especially of religion, the "supernatural," and world view, are discussed in the context of various cultures.

CRN: 12548
Instructor: Yurguis
4 credits


ANTH 2700 R11 - You Are What You Eat
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

As the center of all significant human rituals and ceremonies, food is studied by a range of natural and social scientists. For the anthropologist, food is connected to the human body, health social relations, identity, and even ideology; we are literally what we eat. This course examines the role food plays in shaping cultural practices throughout the world. Students will explore changing concepts of food through time, beginning with early humans, modes of food production, and consumption. Through primary literature, lectures, local ethnic markets, and sharing meals throughout the semester, this class will immerse you in the theoretical and empirical significance of the cross-cultural significance of food. Bon appetit!

CRN: 12619
Instructor: Kleinman
4 credits


ANTH 2886 L11 - Anthropology Of Gender And Sexuality
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Are sex roles biologically determined or culturally defined? A cross-cultural perspective provides a unique opportunity to explore answers to this question through an examination of the roles of men and women in marriage and the family and in economic, political and religious institutions, as well as how such roles are interrelated with conceptions of masculinity, femininity, honor, and shame.

CRN: 12620
Instructor: Sawalha
4 credits


ANTH 3385 R21 - Post Apocalyptic Societies
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Humans have a long fascination with cataclysmic events. This course will use post-apocalyptic fiction as ethnography to examine the processes and forms of culture change in the wake of catastrophic events such as nuclear war, viral epidemics, and alien invasions. Using popular culture, we will study how humans adapt to the loss of the familiar structures that shape their lives, and will seek to develop a broad understanding of human cultural formation through these cases of its complete annihilation. 

CRN: 12590
Instructor: George
4 credits


ANTH 3482 R11 - Reading Latin America: The Colonial Archive
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

The course will assess non-Western theoretical approaches that incorporate ancestral understandings and cosmologies rejected by the colonial onslaught but that still survive in both pre-colonial texts and contemporary Indigenous Andean communities. The course will focus on the earliest 16th century ethnohistoric documents of the region, including: Guamán Poma de Ayala’s La nueva crónica y buen gobierno by Guamán; Cristóbal de Albornoz’ La instrucción para descubrir las guacas del Pirú y sus camayos y haziendas; and Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo’s La historia natural de las Indias. Ultimately the course looks to assess how these non-Western Andean theoretical categories might prove useful to understand historical knowledge and social transformation differently. The course will be structured as an upper-class seminar with close reading of the texts, as well as regular class discussion and participation.

Closed
Instructor: Benavides
4 credits


ANTH 4004 L11 - Art Worlds: Anthropology and Social Perspective
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City's cultural communities and institutions, this course will analyze many of the arts and artistic communities of New York City. The study of culture generally, aand art worlds more specifically, allows us to understand art and culture not only as aesthetic experiences but also as institutional, economic, social and political phenomena. Our summer mid-day time slot will allow us to avail ourselves of numerous field trips and cultural excursions to support our discussions, readings, and lectures. This course currently fulfills an Interdisciplinary Capstone Core requirements for Fordham College students and is expected to be listed as an EP3 course by Summer 2014.

CRN: 12622
Instructor: Sawalha
4 credits


SOCI 1100 L11 - Introduction To Sociology
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and the family, adaptions to the environment and to political, economic and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures.

CRN: 12784
Instructor: Weinshenker
3 credits


SOCI 1100 R11 - Introduction To Sociology
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 7-10:00 p.m.

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course is required prior to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

CRN: 12785
Instructor: Durkin
3 credits


SOCI 1100 L21 - Introduction To Sociology
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 7-10 a.m.

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course is required prior to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

CRN: 12753
Instructor: Nerio
3 credits


SOCI 1100 R21 - Introduction To Sociology
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course is required prior to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

CRN: 12754
Instructor: Motto
3 credits


SOCI 2420 R11 - Social Problems Race Ethnicity
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course explores the historical and contemporary issues surrounding the impact that race and ethnicity have in society. Students will examine how racial and ethnic criteria often guide important economic, political, and social decisions that affect access to resources by various groups and which usually have major consequences for the individual. Fulfills the Pluralism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 12786
Instructor: Quinn
4 credits


SOCI 2847 R21 - The 60's: Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

The 1960's was one of the most tumultuous eras in American history, marked by a revolutionary movement led by youth struggling for freedom on many levels. African Americans, with white support, struggled against the oppression of racial segregation of the South in the Civil Rights movement: young people sought sexual freedom and the right to experiment with drugs; musicians broke away from the restraints of traditional pop and folk songs and created rock and roll; politically-minded youth attacked the traditional institutions of political and economic power by protesting against the war in Vietnam; women challenged traditional male attitudes that confined them to domesticity or inferior status in the work place and in society; gays organized against the repressive laws and prejudices against homosexuality. This course will show how all of these social strands intertwined using films, music and writings from the era.

CRN: 12755
Instructor: Wormser
4 credits


SOCI 2925 R21 - Media Crime Sex Violence
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Turn on the television set, pick up the local newspaper, go on the Internet or watch a movie. Wherever you turn, you will find the media-saturated with stories about corrupt cops and honest cops, drug dealers and drug users, murderers and victims, organized crime and serial killers, crusading district attorneys and defense attorneys, corrupt lawyers and hanging judges, violent prisoners and convicted innocents. How accurate are these representations? What are the ideological messages and cultural values these stories communicate? In this course, you will learn how to demystify media representations in order to understand how and why they are produced, and who is responsible for their production.

CRN: 12756
Instructor: Wormser
4 credits


SOCI 2960 L11 - Popular Culture
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course will investigate the nature of contemporary popular culture. How do people spend their "spare time"? Does this vary with social class? Is sport the new religion? And how does this differ from that of earlier periods and simpler societies?

Closed
Instructor: McGee
4 credits


SOCI 3152 R21 - Sociology Of Sports
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

In all societies, sports and athletics are socially organized into official events, group rituals, tests of manhood, areas for the expression of political sentiments. In modern societies they have become major industries (and their players, cultural heroes and celebrities); spectator sports and their audiences are important features of post-industrial societies.

CRN: 12757
Instructor: Benavides
4 credits


SOCI 3249 L11 - For The Death Of Me
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

The primary goal of this course is to explore the social and cultural implications of the biological experience of human death and dying. Examples of topics that will be covered include: mortuary rituals and funerary behavior, the cultural construction of death, the effects of death on the social fabric, morning and bereavement, end-of-life issues, as well as ethical and moral Issues relating to death. Throughout the course, we will examine the fascinating variety of social and cultural responses to the biological fact of death. In doing so, we will explore Anthropological and Sociological literature that seeks to explain or interpret that tremendous variety. The course will be cross-cultural In Its outlook and will require students to make conceptual connections between theoretical literature and empirical observations. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Yurguis
4 credits


SOCI 3406 R11 - Race/Social Construct
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course concerns the evolution of racial typologies and classification system in the U.S. We will draw on a variety of texts from natural and social sciences, law, and literature to examine how "scientific" typologies of race are actually more reflective of power dynamics and social hierarchies than biological or genetic differences. Our goal is to understand the continuing significance of race in terms of social and economic power, as well and individual self-conceptualizations and identity politics.

CRN: 12796
Instructor: Valle
4 credits


SOCI 3713 L21 - Criminology
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course surveys the state of knowledge and theories explaining criminal behavior and attempts to control it by society. Although the sociological perspective on crime is emphasized, class discussion and the text attempt to examine the subject from a multidisciplinary point of view, especially with respect to legal, biological, and psychological views of crime.

CRN: 12758
Instructor: Adam
4 credits


SOCI 4004 L11 - Art Worlds: Anthropology and Social Perspective
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

The study of culture generally, and art world more specifically, allows us to understand the arts not only as aesthetics experiences, but also as institutional, economic, social, and political phenomena. Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City’s cultural communities and institutions, the course will introduce students to issues in and methods for cultural analysis. The analysis of art worlds will include: 1) a consideration of the intentions of creative agents or producers; 2) the distribution of these objects within particular systems; and, 3) the reception and interpretation of these objects by and within particular social groups or communities.

Closed
Instructor: McGee
4 credits


SOCI 4900 L31 - Internship Seminar
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: M, 6-9 p.m.

Placement in a work setting of their choice provides students with an opportunity to assess their own career goals while simultaneously enriching their understanding of how social groups function. Issues and topics from the sociology of formal organizations, including work role socialization; organization of social systems; bureaucracy and its public, formal, and social processes in organizations; managerial ideologies; and the relationship between character and career are discussed.

CRN: 12842
Instructor: Young, Lauricella
4 credits


SOCI 4971 R11 - Dilemmas Of The Modern Self
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Modern selfhood or identity is studied as a series of conflicts or dilemmas "What is a self today?" What are the special problems of ourselves as modern and post-modern "subjects?". Fulfills the EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Durkin
4 credits