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Latin American and Latino Studies Summer Courses

Classes listed as "online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during a portion of their scheduled meeting times with additional coursework to be completed asynchronously. Session III online courses are all asynchronous.

AFAM 3150 L11 - Caribbean Peoples and Culture
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

An examination of the historical, cultural and contemporary characteristics of various ethnic groups in the Caribbean. Special attention will be devoted to Afro-West Indians.

CRN: 12412
Instructor: Maddox
4 credits


ANTH 2619 L21 - Magic Science and Religion
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Magic, science and religion will be analyzed, compared and contrasted. Problems in the comparative study of these topics, especially of religion, the "supernatural," and world view, are discussed in the context of various cultures.

CRN: 12548
Instructor: Yurguis
4 credits


COMC 3247 L11 - Race, Class, and Gender in Media
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: Th, 9 a.m.-Noon

This class analyzes representations of social class, racial and ethnic identity, and gender and sexuality in media. We begin our work with two assumptions. First, that media both shape and are shaped by social conceptions. Second, that these categories—race, class, and gender—are embodied, that is, they describe different physical bodies that inhabit real, lived environments. From there, students learn to identify central themes and problems in representing differences of race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality in fiction and nonfiction media. The class will use a mixture of hands-on activities with contemporary media (such as blogging, journaling, and online discussion) plus more traditional readings about theories of representation and embodiment. The course is intended as a learning environment where students are able to do more than simply identify stereotypes. Rather, they intervene in these representations, actively critiquing stereotypes and moving past them towards a reflective attitude about the relationship between society as it is lived for people of different racial, sexual, and class groups—and the image of those groups as depicted in media.

CRN: 12431
Instructor: Schwartz
4 credits


HIST 3950 R21 - Latino History
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, sexuality, and citizenship. Specific topics include: United States colonial expansion and its effects on the population of Latin America; Mexican-Americans, and the making of the West; colonialism and the Puerto Rican Diaspora; Caribbean revolutions and the Cuban-American community; and globalization and recent Latina/o migrations (Dominicans, Colombians).

CRN: 12654
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits


HIST 3969 R11 - Latin America and The U.S.
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course will be a survey of the history of the Latin America policy of the United States and the impact of such policy on the Latin American countries.

CRN: 12472
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits


POSC 3616 L21 - Political Economy of Poverty
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course examines the causes of widespread poverty in the developing world from a political economy perspective. The aim is to understand the relationship between political, economic, and social phenomena in causing, perpetuating, and alleviating poverty across the globe. Course readings include classic texts in the field, policy strategies and debates, and case studies on Latin America, Middle East, South and East Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. Critical analysis of the issues and approaches is strongly encouraged.

CRN: 12733
Instructor: Bastiaens
4 credits


POSC 3915 L11 - International Political Economy
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MW, 6-9 p.m.

This course introduces various theoretical frameworks explaining the international political economy and examine topics including trade, monetary policy, exchange rates, finance, multinational corporations, international institutions, and economic development. There is a particular focus on the distribution of benefits within an increasingly globalized world, and the ways in which interest groups work to advance their favored economic policies within this system.

CRN:
Instructor: Bastiaens
4 credits


POSC 4037 L21 - Social Movements and Revolutions
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Over the course of world history, various social movements were formed to challenge dominant power relations and bring about social change. Drawing upon literature in history, political science, and sociology, this course examines a wide range of challenger organizations and revolutions. In particular, this course discusses the development of several twenty-first century social movements and revolutions in the United States and abroad, including Black Lives Matter, the Occupy Wall Street, Otpor (Serbia), the Arab Spring (Middle East), Umbrella Revolution (Hong Kong), and EuroMaidan (Ukraine).

CRN: 12735
Instructor: Nikolayenko
4 credits


PSYC 3600 L11 - Multicultural Issues
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

The focus of this course is the multicultural applicability of scientific and professional psychology. Traditional psychological theories, scientific psychology, psychological tests, and the practice of psychology will be examined and critiqued from cultural and socio-historical perspectives. Contemporary psychological theories and research specific to men, women, gay men, lesbians, and race/ethnicity will be reviewed.

CRN: 12522
Instructor: Cisse
4 credits


SOCI 2420 R11 - Social Problems Race Ethnicity
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course explores the historical and contemporary issues surrounding the impact that race and ethnicity have in society. Students will examine how racial and ethnic criteria often guide important economic, political, and social decisions that affect access to resources by various groups and which usually have major consequences for the individual.

CRN: 12786
Instructor: Quinn
4 credits