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Graduate Arts and Sciences Summer Courses

Classes listed as "online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during a portion of their scheduled meeting times with additional coursework to be completed asynchronously. Session III online courses are all asynchronous.
 

Center for Society and Ethics

CEED 5600 - Special Topics in Ethics and Society
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. This course will provide students with interdisciplinary perspectives on contemporary issues in ethics and society across the humanities and the social and natural sciences. Class readings and discussions will provide students with the tools to apply ethical principles, theories, and decision-making to issues of social import across diverse contexts and populations.

CRN: 12858
Instructor: Swartzer
3 credits


Computer Science

CISC 5380 L21 - Programming With Python
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MW, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. This course is an introduction to the Python programming language for students without prior programming experience. Students will learn how to use Python both interactively and through a script. The topics covered include variables, strings, numbers, control statements (conditional statements and loops), lists and sequences, functions, dictionaries, recursive functions, classes, and iterators and generators. Python is a programming language with a relatively simple syntax and a powerful set of libraries. After completion of this course, students will be competent in using Python libraries to process numerical and textual data. Working with Python packages for statistical and numerical data analysis, as well as the natural language processing problems, is explored. Matplotlib, a Python 2D plotting library which produces publication-quality figures in a variety of hard-copy formats, is used throughout the course.

CRN: 12865
Instructor: Strzemecki
3 credits

CISC 5550 L11 - Cloud Computing
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. This course provides the needed knowledge to understand the technologies and services that enable cloud computing, discusses different types of cloud computing models and investigates security and legal issues associated with cloud computing. Topics include Cloud infrastructure components and interfaces, essential characteristics of Cloud platforms, common deployment modes, techniques for deploying and scaling cloud resources and security implication of cloud resources.

CRN: 12882
Instructor: Ji
3 credits

CISC 5900 L11 - Information Fusion
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MW, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. A study of the structure and function of information fusion. Efficient and effective combination of data or information from a variety of diverse sources, sensors, features, and decisions. Applications and case studies of information fusion and decision making to a plethora of disciplines including science and engineering, cybersecurity and digital networks, medicine and health, social choices and human cognition, business and finance, and management and innovation.

CRN: 12871
Instructor: Hsu
3 credits

CISC 5980 L11 - Introduction to Fintech
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: TTh, 6-9pm

 

CRN:
Instructor: Xiaoxu
3 credits

CISC 6080 L31 - Capstone Project In Data Science
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: F, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. The goal of this class is to sharpen students’ skills in data science by designing and implementing a capstone project. Through this class, students should gain a deep understanding of state-of-the-art data science technologies and current knowledge. Students are required to finish a large capstone project and are expected to present and write one or more research papers in this class.

CRN: 12870
Instructor: Weiss
3 credits

CISC 6500 L11 - Bioinformatics
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MW, 6-9pm

Graduate course. This course studies the relation of (interaction between) molecular biology and information science and the impact and applications of combinatorics, computing, and informatics on the biomedical sciences and clinical processes. Topics include: DNA sequence and alignment, database searching and data analysis, phylogenetic analysis and evolution, genomic and proteomics, structure and function, gene regulatory networks and metabolic pathways, microarray technology, and gene expression algorithms.

CRN: 12884
Instructor: Xiaoxu
3 credits

CISC 6600 L31 - Secure Cloud Computing
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: U, 2-6:30 p.m.

Graduate course. This graduate course covers the essentials of designing and building a secure local area network, incorporating all elements of the seven layers of the ISO-OSI Model. Students will learn the capabilities, limitations, and vulnerabilities of a cyber network. Students will gain hands-on experience by implementing a secure network environment that is robust in preventing various adversary actions including, among others, extreme hacking and virus propagation.

CRN: 12866
Instructor: Bhuiyan
3 credits

CISC 6630 L31 - Wireless Security
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: ,

 

CRN: 12883
Instructor: Bhuiyan
3 credits

CISC 6640 L31 - Privacy & Security In Big Data
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: U, 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Graduate course. This course targets the security and privacy issues associated with systems that process and store large amounts of data. The main concern is to process this data in a timely manner without compromising security and privacy of the users. Real world examples will be studied and analyzed to enable students to apply the suitable technological tools and techniques to protect the system and evaluate the suggested solutions. Covered topics include access control mechanisms, privacy protocol and methods, data confidentiality and integrity, security challenges and attacks on big data systems.

CRN:
Instructor: Bhuiyan
3 credits


Latin

LATN 5090 - Latin for Reading
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MW, 1-4 p.m.

Graduate course. A course designed for graduate students seeking a reading knowledge of Latin in their discipline. Some prior study of Latin is desirable but not necessary.

CRN: 12696
Instructor: McGowan
3 credits

LATN 5093 - Ecclesiastical Latin
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MW, 1-4 p.m.

Graduate course. A study of the grammatical structure, form, and vocabulary of Church Latin, focussing on the Bible, the Church Fathers, and medieval thinkers.

CRN: 12808
Instructor: McGowan
3 credits


Economics

ECON 5006 - Programming Economics and Finance
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MW, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. This course introduces the student to various computer programs and their applications in economics and in finance. The course begins with a general review of programming skills using MATLAB. It then presents other statistical and econometric packages such as SAS and STATA. The course concludes with a review of the LATEX program.

CRN: 12450
Instructor: Rengifo Minaya
3 credits

ECON 5020 - African Economic Development
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Hybrid, Rose Hill: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. The key objective of this course is to develop an understanding of the economic development problems of Africa, the trade patterns and financial relationships of Africa to the rest of the world. With examples, application, and country case studies, the course covers major development challenges and the possible solutions, the growing influence of African economics in industrialized and developing countries as well as future prospects.

CRN: 12604
Instructor: Themeli
3 credits

ECON 5040 - Strategic Financial Management
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. An introduction to the basic questions facing an investor evaluating firm policy. The course covers debt/equity choice, dividend policy, and principle/ agent problems within the firm. The value of the firm under different financial and managerial structures. Current research is surveyed to determine how investors interpret various financial arrangements such as divident policy, taxes, and stock offerings. Specific attention will be paid to information and incentives of each party in a financial contract in the context of structuring the firm, running the firm efficiently, and if all else fails, bankruptcy.

CRN: 12451
Instructor: Rengifo Minaya
3 credits

ECON 5415 - Gender and Economic Development
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MW, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. Analyze the social nature of gender and economic development in a cross-cultural perspective. Topics include household labor, occupational segregation and earnings, inequality in market work, poverty, family structure, public policy and gender equity. The course draws on material from economics and other social sciences to analyze the social nature of gender and economic development in a cross-cultural perspective. Topics include women's household labor; occupational segregation and earnings, inequality in market work; the intersections of gender, class, race, and ethnicity; women and poverty; family structure; public policy and gender equity.

CRN: 12452
Instructor: Combs
3 credits

ECON 5540 - Emerging Markets
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Hybrid, Rose Hill: MW, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. Intended primarily for IPED students interested in analyzing the dynamincs of emerging finanacial markets in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The course compliments POGA 6991- Political Risk Analysis. Students must prepare a country study regarding one country's basic macroeconomic performance, foreign exchange market, and stock market. Use of a computer and the Internet are incorporated into the course to gather data and analyze it statistically. Intended primarily for IPED students, this course explores the dynamics of emerging financial markets in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America. Complimenting and expanding upon the skills learned in POGA 6991 Political Risk Analysis, students learn how to prepare a country study regarding their country's leading macroeconomic indicators, the stability of its foreign exchange market, and the likely returns and risks associated with its stock market. Real time data is obtained from the university's Bloomberg Terminal and the internet. Additional data is available from standard written and CD-ROM statistical sources. Students are taught how to analyze this data using standard statistical software to forecast trends as well as to extimate returns, volatility and cross correlations. An optimal portfolio of equity investments in emerging markets is estimated. Interest in analyzing the dynamics of emerging financial markets in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America.

CRN: 12605
Instructor: Schwalbenberg
3 credits

ECON 5771 - Project Assessment
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: , 9 a.m.-Noon

Graduate course. Uses the logical framework analysis frequently mandated by USAID to design a results based system to monitor and evaluate small community development projects.

CRN: 12453
Instructor: Schwalbenberg
3 credits

IPED 8080 - IPED Internship
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online

Graduate course. The Economics Internship course provides Economics graduate students the opportunity to accumulate relevant professional experience and practical training that they may need.

CRN: 12803
Instructor: Schwalbenberg
3 credits

IPED 8085 - IPED Internship
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online

Graduate course. The Economics Internship course provides Economics graduate students the opportunity to accumulate relevant professional experience and practical training that they may need.

CRN: 12804
Instructor: Schwalbenberg
0.5 credits

IPED 8090 - IPED Intern Fellow
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online

Graduate course. The Economics Internship course provides Economics graduate students the opportunity to accumulate relevant professional experience and practical training that they may need.

CRN: 12805
Instructor: Schwalbenberg
0 credits


History

HIST 5105 - The Black Radical Tradition in US History
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Hybrid, Rose Hill: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. This course explores the long history of black radicalism through a comparison of the United States and the caribbean as centers of revolutionary movements that engaged problems of democracy, racism and citizenship in the global black diaspora.

CRN: 12677
Instructor: Alcenat
4 credits

HIST 5204 - Medieval Environmental History
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, Asynchronous

Graduate course. This seminar is intended to familiarize graduate students with current themes and trends in medieval environmental history. Weekly reading assignments comprise historical monographs and scholarly articles in English.

CRN: 12828
Instructor: Bruce
4 credits

HIST 5566 - Technology and Empire
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MW, 1-4 p.m.

Graduate course. This course, "Science, Technology, and Imperialism," will explore the crucial relationship between science and imperialism, with a particular focus on European imperial expansion from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Students will use a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to raise and reframe fundamental questions about the role of science and technology as "tools of empire". For example, the course will explore how the equation of European science and technology with "progress" depended to a large degree on European perceptions of the colonized. Using multiple viewpoints from Europe, Africa, and India, the course will provide a fresh and unique view on the history of Imperialism that will locate science and technology as fundamental to understanding such contested concepts as conquest, progress, and modernity.

CRN: 12475
Instructor: Siddiqi
4 credits


Humanitarian Studies

HUAF 5013 - Fundamentals of Humanitarian Action
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TTh, 5-8 p.m.

Graduate course. This course will introduce students to the principles of humanitarian action through three modules on (1) Defining Humanitarian Assistance, (2) Management, and (3) Strategic Planning. The aim of the course is to provide an overview of the critical aspects of international humanitarian coordination from an organizational perspective.

CRN: 12802
Instructor: TBA
3 credits

HUAF 5801 - Humanitarian Internship
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online

Graduate course. Students will have an opportunity to intern at prominent international humanitarian organizations, helping them gain the necessary exposure and understanding of the dynamics of such organizations and their mission. Students must submit a final paper to their course instructor at the end of the internship.

CRN: 12692
Instructor: Perez
1 credits


Medival Studies

MVST 5311 - Arthurian Literature
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill: TTh, 1-4 p.m.

Graduate course. Readings will include excerpts from Geoffrey of Monmouth, Wace and Layamon on the origins of the idea of Arthur. Later we will read Chretien De Troyes*Lancelot(The Knight of the Cart)*, part of the *Alliterative Morte Arthure*, and the conclusion to Thomas Malory's *Le Morte Arthur* Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

CRN:
Instructor: Hafner
4 credits


Political Science

POSC 6991 - Political Risk Analysis
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill: MW, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. This course is primarily a research/writing course that culminates in an original paper where you will be required to analyze the political risks associated with a country of your choosing. While there will be only a minimal number of lectures, the instructor will serve as your individual mentor as you develop and present your paper. As part of the process of writing this paper, you will study methods used to assess and manage the political risks associatedwith foreign investment and international business; learn how to assess the domestic political climate of a country by examining factors such as the levelsof political violence, the stability of the government, and the existence of political democracy, and make an overall assessment of a country's economic climate by evaluating key macroeconomic indicators. You will also learn the importance of studying foreign relations of a country in order to evaluate the likelihood of any conflict it might have with its neighbors.

CRN: 12517
Instructor: Entelis
3 credits


Psychology

PSYC 5200 R11 - Fixing Psychology’s Replication Crisis
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TTh, 1-4 p.m.

Graduate course. This course is an introduction to the Open Science approach to psychology. We will trace the origins of a “replication crisis” that shook the field over the past 10 years. This involves understanding some faulty research practices and misguided incentives within the discipline that arguably undermined the scientific process. We engage those issues primarily by reviewing “autopsies” of some psychological findings that have been challenged recently. Then we explore some reform practices that are intended to foster a more transparent, reproducible, and accurate research enterprise. Our ultimate goal is to help you to figure out whether open science practices might enhance the ways you “do” and consume research, the way that you teach undergraduates and interact with peers when conducting or analyzing research, and how you might advocate for reform in your own academic networks.

CRN: 12572
Instructor: Conway
3 credits

PSYC 6066 - History and Systems
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MW, 1-4 p.m.

Graduate course. This course surveys the history of the major systems of psychology from pre-Socratic philosophers to contemporary cognitive science and neuroscience. Key men and women who contributed to the development of theories about and methods used to study personality, emotion, intelligence, cognition, and psychobiology are discussed within their historical, religious, cultural, and political contexts.

CRN: 12747
Instructor: Mattson
3 credits

PSYC 6670 - Psychopharmacology
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MW, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Graduate course. Theory and practice of college teaching will be reviewed. Topics will include lecturing, demonstrations, assessment methods, out of class writing assignments, syllabus preperation, local requirements and values

CRN: 12752
Instructor: McKay
3 credits

PSYC 7990 - The Teaching of Psychology
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Graduate course. Theory and practice of college teaching will be reviewed. Topics will include lecturing, demonstrations, assessment methods, out of class writing assignments, syllabus preperation, local requirements and values

CRN: 12527
Instructor: Andover
3 credits