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Classical Languages and Civilization Summer Courses

Classes listed as "online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during a portion of their scheduled meeting times with additional coursework to be completed asynchronously. Session III online courses are all asynchronous.

CLAS 1210 PW1 - Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Greece
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

A political, social, and intellectual history of ancient Greece from its origin to the death of Alexander the Great.

CRN: 12818
Instructor: Foster
3 credits


CLAS 1220 R21 - Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Rome
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online, TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Introduction to Roman History focusing on problems and sources.

CRN: 12791
Instructor: Keil
3 credits


CLAS 2000 R21 - Texts and Contexts: Myth in Greco-Roman Literature
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online, TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

An introduction to the literary analysis of texts and the cultural and historical contexts within which they are produced and read. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 12793
Instructor: Keil
3 credits


CLAS 3030 PW1 - Athenian Democracy
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

A historical overview and morphological description of democracy as it was practiced in Athens from 508 BCE until 322 BCE. In addition to surveying how Athenian democracy evolved and an overview of its most salient features, we will also investigate how classical Athenian democracy was imagined and criticized by leading thinkers contemporary with it.

CRN: 12860
Instructor: Foster
4 credits


CLAS 4020 R11 - Classical Tradition in Fiction and Film
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online, MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course provides a survey of classical works from ancient Greece and Rome and their reception in contemporary literature and film. The objective is threefold: first, to learn about patterns of narrative intrinsic to the representation of myth and history in classical literature; then to observe how these patterns function both in works of the classical period and also in contemporary fiction and film; and finally, to consider why classical antiquity has proved an enduring source of inspiration for writers and film-makers of today. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 12628
Instructor: TBA
4 credits